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October 11, 2019

Famous People with a Warrensburg, Missouri Connection

Notable residents
* John William 'Blind' Boone (1864–1927), African-American concert pianist, composer and principal for the Blind Boone Concert Company, Mr. Boone is considered by many to be a pioneer of modern music. 
The BBCC played over 8000 concerts in the U.S., Canada & Mexico. 
John Lange and Blind Boone. The Most astute, dignified and successful manager of the race, and the greatest living musical prodigy, who have journeyed together in the Blind Boone Concert Company thirty-five years, a record unsurpassed or equalled by any other company, white or colored in America.  Both philanthropic, generous and kind hearted to a degree, they are loved by their race throughout the length and breadth of America.. Kansas City Sun, Associated Press, December 5, 1914
He spent his youth in Warrensburg where a park and festival was subsequently named for him.  http://shs.umsystem.edu/historicmissourians/name/b/blindboone/index.html


Blind Boone, Pianist, John Lange, Manager, Mis Marie Jackman, Soprano,
Miss Margeceri E. Boyd
Rachel Hendricks, Gravemarker, SE Corner of Sunset Hill Cemetery,
Warrensburg, Missouri
Mother of "Blind" Boone

Louis Menze, legendary Iowa State Basketball coach. Played basketball and baseball at UCM (State Normal). He played for Dr. Phog Allen, later the head coach at Kansas University. KU.
* Dale Carnegie (November 24, 1888–November 1, 1955), author of How to Win Friends and Influence People, and the developer of numerous highly influential courses in self-improvement, corporate communication, and related fields, studied communication at the Missouri State Teacher's College, now University of Central Missouri.
Mary Fallin (born December 9, 1954) is the 27th and current Governor of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. She was a U.S. Representative for Oklahoma's 5th congressional district from 2007 until 2011.[3]
She is the second woman elected to the United States Congress from Oklahoma and the first since 1921 when Alice Mary Robertson was elected to Congress and served for one term from 1921 to 1923. She was the first Republican and first woman to serve as Lieutenant Governor of Oklahoma. She served in that post from 1995 to 2007. She is also the first woman to serve as Governor of Oklahoma.Fallin was born Mary Copeland in Warrensburg, Missouri, the daughter of Mary Jo (née Duggan) and Joseph Newton Copeland.

Her mother and father both served terms as mayor of Tecumseh, Oklahoma, where she was raised. Both of them were moderate Democrats, also known as Dixicrats. She too was a Democrat until she was 21, when she switched to the Republican Party of Oklahoma and became active with the Young Republicans. She graduated from Tecumseh High School and went on to attend Oklahoma Baptist University in Shawnee as well as the University of Central Oklahoma in Edmond. Fallin holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Human and Environmental Sciences as well as Family Relations and Child Development from Oklahoma State University(1977).
After college, she worked for the Oklahoma Department of Tourism/Recreation, Oklahoma Employment Security Commission, and Oklahoma Office of Personnel Management. In 1983, she went to the private sector as a hotel manager for Lexington Hotel and Suites. She was also a commercial real estate broker.

*Errett Lobban Cord, U.S. automobile manufacturer & advocate of front-wheel-drive vehicles. He founded the Cord Corporation & established a holding company that produced the Cord Automobile (designed in 1935 by engineer Gordon Buehrig) along with the Auburn and Duesenberg Automobiles in Indiana. E.L. Cord was born and raised in Warrensburg. His father owned a general store in downtown Warrensburg and the building still stands bearing his name.

* Dean Hughes (born 1943), taught English at Central Missouri State University, now University of Central Missouri, for several years; the setting of his best-selling series of children's books starring Nutty Nutsell is based on the lab school run by the university's education program in the 1980s.
* Sidney Toler (April 28, 1874–February 12, 1947), actor, writer, and the second non-Asian to play the role of Charlie Chan in films, was born in Warrensburg. Sidney Sommers Toler was born in Warrensburg, MO, the son of a renowned horse-breeder, Col. H.G. Toler, in 1874; three weeks later, the family moved to a stock farm near Wichita, KS, where he grew up. 
Curtis Niles Cooper, mathematician, UCM
* Old Drum - The phrase "Man's Best Friend" originated in a speech given given by George Vest in a trial that concerned this dog.
* Bruce Achauer, MD,  1943-2002  Professor of Surgery, UC Irvine rose to the top of his profession, becoming renowned worldwide as a brilliant surgeon, lecturer and author of Plastic Surgery textbooks

IN MEMORIAM

 Bruce M. Achauer, M.D.
Professor of Surgery
Irvine
1943-2002
Born in the small town of Warrensburg, Missouri, Bruce Achauer rose to the top of his profession, becoming renowned worldwide as a brilliant surgeon, superb educator and exceptional researcher—all accomplished while continuing a full-time clinical practice in plastic and reconstructive surgery. No doubt influenced by working in his father’s pharmacy, at age 13 Dr. Achauer decided on a career in medicine. After undergraduate education at Stanford University, he obtained his medical degree at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston in 1967. He applied successfully for the highly competitive rotating internship at San Francisco General Hospital, and then came to the University of California Irvine to complete residencies in general and plastic surgery between 1970 and 1976. To round out his clinical training, he traveled to the Queen Victoria Hospital in Sussex, United Kingdom as a Marks Fellow in Plastic Surgery. During the tumultuous years of the Vietnam conflict, Dr. Achauer served as a captain and flight surgeon in the United States Air Force based at the School of Aerospace Medicine in San Antonio between 1968 and 1970. On return from England, he was certified by both the American Board of Surgery and the American Board of Plastic Surgery and was appointed assistant professor of surgery at UC Irvine in 1977. He was promoted to adjunct professor in 1994, a position he held until his untimely death.
The milestones in his life, distinguished as they are, do not reveal the enormous impact Bruce Achauer had on the lives of his patients, fellow practitioners and family. His professional devotion was to reconstructive surgery and the Burn Unit at the UCI Medical Center. There he achieved well-deserved national acclaim for his treatment of a 6-year-old badly burned in a motel fire in 1983 and a teenage girl who had been burned severely with acid in 1984. He performed reconstructive surgery on countless numbers of burned patients at UCI Medical Center, and at the same time was widely considered a master of aesthetic plastic surgery. Dr. Achauer also had steady research support for 21 years with half a dozen active projects at the time of his death. He studied the use of cyclosporin in the prolongation of allografts, and developed non-invasive methods to accurately assess the depth of the burn wound. His curriculum vitae listed 151 peer-reviewed articles and 48 book chapters. Dr. Achauer edited and wrote four major textbooks in plastic surgery with the most recent five-volume text described as the “comprehensive bible of plastic surgery.” Dr. Achauer’s service to the University was unstinting, including work on most of the Hospital Committees. He was an administrative officer of the California Society of Plastic Surgeons and medical advisor to the Orange County Burn Association. Perhaps his most important service to the University was acting chief of the Plastic Surgery Division some four years ago during which time the Division began reorganization. International recognition came through many visiting professorships at universities in Ireland, Finland, Kuwait, Brazil and Mexico. At home, he had been a visiting professor at the University of Pittsburgh, Ohio State, the University of California, San Francisco, his alma mater Baylor College of Medicine, Indiana University and the University of Texas, Dallas. These many invitations and recognitions notwithstanding, Dr. Achauer made time to serve as a commencement speaker at Warrensburg High School. In his private life Dr. Achauer was an avid sailor who knew the marine charts of the coastal waters of Southern California as well as the anatomical charts for the structures of the face.
While serving as president of the board of directors of the Educational Foundation of the American Society of Plastic Surgery and a director of the American Board of Plastic Surgery, Dr. Achauer attended the National American Society of Plastic Surgeons Annual Congress in San Antonio late in 2002. Tragically, he developed a gastrointestinal bacterial infection and succumbed to bloodstream infection within 48 hours. Plastic surgeons from across the country attended the family memorial service and an honor guard of firefighters, who knew best Dr. Achauer’s challenges and triumphs, paid their respects at the Medical Center remembrance. Dr. Achauer is survived by his wife, Tamara, and two grown daughters, Allison and Hilary. He will be long remembered by the many patients he restored from disfigurement, by the faculty at University of California, Irvine and most of all by his family.
Samuel E. Wilson, M.D.
Gregory R.D. Evans, M.D.

Bruce Achauer, M.D., 1942 to 2002

Alpert, Bernard S. M.D.

Free Acces
The plastic surgery family and many of us personally have suffered a tragic, untimely, and irretrievable loss with the passing of Dr. Bruce Achauer. Bruce’s death was the result of a sudden and unrelenting septic episode sustained while attending the American Society of Plastic Surgeons Annual Scientific Meeting on November 4, 2002, in San Antonio, Texas.
Bruce was born November 11, 1942, in Warrensburg, Missouri, where his parents raised him and his younger sister, Anne. He was greatly influenced by his father, a pharmacist, and at an early age Bruce made the decision to become a physician. He was valedictorian of his high school class, football team captain and quarterback, and an Eagle Scout. Seeking and achieving excellence came early to Bruce and became a lifelong theme; he did it with grace, sensitivity, and a style that appeared effortless.
Bruce graduated from Stanford in 1963 and the Baylor College of Medicine in 1967. After a rotating internship at San Francisco General Hospital, the military called and he spent 2 years as a flight surgeon in the U.S. Air Force. Before induction, he married his sweetheart and from then on lifelong companion, Tamara, creating a match that all who knew them would agree seemed naturally destined. They were married in a small church in Larkspur, California, about a mile from our home. They were married 34 years.
After general and plastic surgery residencies at University of California at Irvine, Bruce entered practice in Orange County, California. He became a professor of plastic surgery at University of California at Irvine and director of its highly acclaimed burn unit, as well as the director of plastic surgery at the Beckman Laser Institute in Irvine. He made seminal contributions in both burn and laser care, and published more than 150 scientific articles. He edited a monumental work,Plastic Surgery: Indications, Operations, and Outcomes, a five-volume textbook of plastic surgery, utilized extensively worldwide.
Bruce rose to the pinnacle of our profession, and he did so without ever taking advantage of any situation or individual. If you heard of his achievements, it was always from others, not him; and perhaps most unusual for such professions, the magnitude of his achievements far exceeded the magnitude of his ego. This measured strength, possessed by few, was a signature. Such treasured qualities evoked the trust and confidence of peers, and Bruce became president of the Plastic Surgery Educational Foundation (1999 to 2000) and Chair of the American Board of Plastic Surgery (2001 to 2002).
Bruce had a thirst for adventure that wove a consistent thread through his life. As a young surgeon, he desired to see the hallowed halls of the beginnings of twentieth century plastic surgery, and so he and Tamara took their two young daughters and journeyed to Sweden and Scotland, where they would stay in tents in campgrounds with Bruce emerging from the tent each morning in a suit and tie to visit such places in Stockholm and Glasgow. Summer weekend routines for the family in Long Beach were sails from their home to Catalina Island and back. Time was spent in the high mountains, both Alpine and cross-country skiing in the winter and high-altitude hut trekking in the summers. The couple climbed to the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro in a blinding snowstorm. Bruce was stoic. I once saw him cross-country ski all day with bleeding heel blisters and never say a word about it.
Bruce Achauer was a person we wanted to represent us. He was a giver. He did it so well. He did it around the world as an emissary for American plastic surgery, in places like Sri Lanka, teaching and using his skills to help others. He did it at home, the embodiment of compassion in caring for the most complicated, tragic, and sometimes highly publicized cases, such as that of David Rothenberg, a terribly burned child. Bruce and Tamara established and endowed a lectureship in biology at Stanford, giving back to his undergraduate university. When asked on one occasion if he’d received any compensation for being a consultant to a television medical drama, he replied, “Yes, two baseball caps. One of them is going to one of my nurses.” Bruce always did us proud.
Bruce had an impact on all who came to know him. He won our regard and was highly esteemed for his ability, integrity, determination, and kindness. At a memorial service for him in Long Beach, California, on November 17, 2002, Stanford classmates around the world waved a hand in respect and recognition for Bruce’s friendship and contributions at the exact moment of the beginning of the service, Pacific standard time. Bruce is survived by his wife Tamara, his two daughters, Allison and Hilary, his sister, Anne Maidment, and his mother, Maureen Achauer.
Plastic surgery has suffered a profound loss. I (and I know I am not alone) have lost someone I could call day or night for assistance, knowing that I would receive trusted counsel and aid without being judged. His loss is painfully unfair; his mark, everlasting. We should all strive to follow his examples, and do him proud.
To Bruce Achauer: With Respect, Admiration, and Love
You spoke—
And the world listened
You lectured—
And the world learned
You wrote—
And the world understood
…….
You smiled—
And the world warmed
You joked—
And the world laughed
You loved—
And the world loved
…….
You made the incision—
And the scars fell away
You placed the sutures—
And the smile returned
…….
You led—
And the world followed
You served—
And the world benefited
You were humble—
And the world was respectful
…….
You lived—
And the world was better
You died—
And the world cried
Robert L. Ruberg, M.D.
N325 Means Hall
1654 Upham Drive
Columbus, Ohio 43210
ruberg-1@medctr.osu.edu
©2003American Society of Plastic Surgeons

Passage: Dr. Bruce Achauer, 59

11.07.02

Achauer, who died Monday after suddenly falling ill while attending a conference, was the plastic surgeon who helped save David Rothenburg, a 6-year-old boy set on fire by his father during a bitter custody battle in 1983. Achauer performed dozens of surgeries and skin grafts on the boy, who had burns over 90 percent of his body. In private practice, Achauer, who recently completed a five-volume work on plastic surgery, worked on children with facial deformities, birthmarks and cleft lips and palates.

* Germaine Race - Former running back for the San Diego Chargers

* Kimberly Wyatt - member of female pop group The Pussycat Dolls
Thomas Benton Hollyman, (December 7, 1919 – November 14, 2009) photographer. After moving to Warrensburg, Missouri, in 1919, where his father became pastor or the Presbyterian Church, Hollyman began publishing a school paper in the sixth grade. Hollyman who said that he “always wanted to be journalist ,” learned to set type as a printer’s devil at the Standard Herald in exchange for lessons in news-writing. He also was the Bandmaster and an original member of Don Essig’s Novelty Music Show an experience he wrote about in an article for May 31, 1958, New Yorker titled” How Culture Came to Sand Springs, Oklahoma.” In high school as a senior, he worked his way to Europe on a German steamship, playing in a five-piece jazz band, the Varsity Club Orchestra. Upon arriving in Europe he bicycled 1400 miles from London to Edinburgh and back.




Thomas Benton Hollyman (December 7, 1919 – November 14, 2009) was an American photographer. 

Graydon Carter, managing editor of Vanity Fair, included Hollyman in his round-up of “ photographic greats” in his magazine’s Editor’s Letter, January 2005, titled “ The Shots Seen Around the World.” These were photographers he wrote, whose “ travels help form the patina of their characters and the grist for their tales.” Although Hollyman worked primarily as a photographer for most of his career, his quest for new challenges also took him to cinema. In 1963, working with the film-maker and British stage director Peter Brook, he served as director of photography for the big-screen version of Lord of the Flies, learning to operate a movie camera a short while before the film began production in Puerto Rico. Brook selected him as a total unknown.

Dr. Harley Benz, Scientist-in-Charge at the 

USGS National Earthquake Information Center

Howard A. Fitch was born in Warrensburg, MO. The Kansas City Structural Steel Company was founded in 1907, by Howard Fitch and Olaf Smith. The main plant was on the site of an old smelting works at 21st Street and Metropolitan Avenue, on the Kaw River. During WWI they supplied structural steel and rudders to the Hog Island shipyard in Philadelphia. During WWII, they built 407 landing craft for the Navy.

John Graves, http://www.thegravesite.com/edu.html After ten gratifying years as an associate professor in the Communication Department at Central Missouri State University(UCM), he retired to Pagosa Springs, Colorado Of the myriad of famous people Graves has met and/or worked with, he recalls associations with three that particularly stand out in his memory: a morning with Lord Bertrand Russell at his home in Wales, an afternoon tea with Katharine Hepburn at her home in Beverly Hills, and the delight of having Eric Sevareid as a house guest for three days in Warrensburg, Missouri.
Jimmy Kemper, syndicated show called Beautiful Thoughts on NBC Blue Radio. He performed in Kansas City and in Chicago as well, this young man ended up in New York.
Throughout this varied career, 
he has always played several nights a week as a single pianist, side man, or band leader at private parties, including affairs for Judy Garland, Groucho Marx, Danny Thomas, and John Wayne. He has recorded, been a staff pianist at KLAC-TV and on the first Betty White show, was musical director for the Gloria Hart Show on KLAC-TV, and has accompanied such artists as George Burns, June Christy, Rosemary Clooney, Rudy Vallee, Redd Foxx, and Jimmy Durante.

Shawn Pelton (born June 1, 1963, in Warrensburg is a New York City-based studio and session drummer. Collaborated with Backstreet Boys, Sheryl Crow, Shawn Colvin, Bruce Springsteen, Celine Dion and Billy Joel. He also is the longtime drummer in the house band for the NBC TV network's sketch comedy and music program Saturday Night Live.
Grant Curtis- Producer of the Spiderman movies grew up in Warrensburg and attended UCMDavid Cook - Contestant on American Idol Season 7 grew up in Blue Springs, Missouri and attended UCM, graduated in 2006.
David Steward - For all his multi-million dollar business success, David Steward smiles For all his multi-million dollar business success, David Steward smiles most often about the small things in life, such as the Little League football team his company sponsors, his strong faith and his belief in putting others first. The 1973 Central Missouri business graduate is founder, chairman, majority owner and CEO of St. Louis-based World Wide Technology. Voted by Ebony in 2002 among “the 100 Most Influential Black Americans” and hailed in 2004 by Black Enterprise magazine as having the largest black-owned business in the U.S., Steward is a homegrown success story. Born in Chicago, he grew up in Clinton, MO, in a three-bedroom home with three brothers and four sisters. Steward was taught by his mother to believe, “you can do anything you want to if you put your mind to it.” From his father, Harold — who fixed cars, hauled trash, worked security, tended bar and cleaned offices — Steward learned to work hard Steward leveraged his CMSU degree into jobs for Missouri Pacific Railroad, Federal Express and Wagner Electric. Determined to own a business, he bought a company from a man nearing retirement. Steward survived lean years when he borrowed against his home, bought groceries on credit and watched his car get repossessed. But he was determined to succeed. In 1990, he started World Wide Technology as a software developer and hardware reseller. With an early introduction to business-to-business e-commerce, World Wide developed other Internet-based applications, including online stores, customer service systems and resource planning systems. Today, World Wide Technology and its affiliate company, Telcobuy.com, employ 600 people and have more than $1 billion annually in sales. For all his company’s national prominence, Stewart continues to volunteer time to his community and alma mater. There’s his church, United Way, Boy Scouts, Girls Inc., and the Mathews-Dickey Herbert Hoover Boys Club, home to his Little League football players. Then, there’s his alma mater. Recently, Steward volunteered proceeds from his book, Doing Business by the Good Book, to help fund UCM's Summer Bridge Program. He also leveraged a book signing party to get other Kansas City organizations and people to help. “Charitable activities are not a burden,Steward said, quoting a favorite Bible verse, “Seek me first in my righteousness and everything else will be added unto thee.”ost often about the small things in life, such as the Little League football team his company sponsors, his strong faith and his belief in putting others first. The 1973 Central Missouri business graduate is founder, chairman, majority owner and CEO of St. Louis-based World Wide Technology. Voted by Ebony in 2002 among“the 100 Most Influential Black Americans" and hailed in 2004 by Black Enterprise magazine as having the largest black-owned business in the U.S., Steward is a homegrown success story. Born in Chicago, he grew up in Clinton, MO, in a three-bedroom home with three brothers and four sisters. Steward was taught by his mother to believe, “you can do anything you want to if you put your mind to it.” From his father, Harold — who fixed cars, hauled trash, worked security, tended bar and cleaned offices — Steward learned to work hard. Steward leveraged his CMSU degree into jobs for Missouri Pacific Railroad, Federal Express and Wagner Electric. Determined to own a business, he bought a company from a man nearing retirement. Steward survived lean years when he borrowed against his home, bought groceries on credit and watched his car get repossessed. But he was determined to succeed. In 1990, he started World Wide Technology as a software developer and hardware reseller. With an early introduction to business-to-business e-commerce, World Wide developed other Internet-based applications, including online stores, customer service systems and resource planning systems. Today, World Wide Technology and its affiliate company, Telcobuy.com, employ 600 people and have more than $1 billion annually in sales. For all his company’s national prominence, Stewart continues to volunteer time to his community and alma mater. There’s his church, United Way, Boy Scouts, Girls Inc., and the Mathews-Dickey Herbert Hoover Boys Club, home to his Little League football players. Then, there’s his alma mater. Recently, Steward volunteered proceeds from his book, Doing Business by the Good Book, to help fund CMSU’s Summer Bridge Program. He also leveraged a book signing party to get other Kansas City organizations and people to help. “Charitable activities are not a burden,” Steward said, quoting a favorite Bible verse, “Seek me first in my righteousness and everything else will be added unto thee."

Achauer House Will Become Home to Alumni, UCM Events

Contact: Jeff MurphyWARRENSBURG, MO (Aug. 29, 2012) – A Warrensburg historic home donated to the University of Central Missouri Foundation by its owner, the late Maurine Achauer, will be utilized for the university’s alumni and events offices.
Built in the 1800s, the three-story Victorian home is located at 314 Holden St. Work begins this fall with a completion date tentative for January 2013. An open house is planned to show the remodeled
The Achauer Home - Warrensburg, Missouri
home to the campus and community.“Maurine truly had an exceptional gift for bringing people together. We’ll never know just how many lives were touched, how many special memories were created, and positive lasting impressions of the Warrensburg community were formed just because she generously opened her front door to others,” said UCM President Charles Ambrose. “We hope that the example she set for all of us and her kind, giving spirit will live on through those who now welcome others into the Achauer House.” “The Achauer House has the tradition of hosting campus and community gatherings, and we plan to honor and continue that tradition,” said Jason Drummond, vice president for development and executive director of the UCM Foundation. “Not only will the home provide alumni and events offices, but it also will be available to community and university groups as a place for special gatherings.” The UCM Foundation is funding the majority of the renovation. The home’s first floor will be remodeled for meetings, receptions and other small events while the second floor will be reconfigured for three offices, storage and a small conference area. The renovation also will update electrical and mechanical systems and address accessibility issues. Many of the home’s historic features, such as the staircase and slate fireplaces, will be retained.
Achauer gifted her home to the UCM Foundation through her estate. The longtime Warrensburg civic leader, resident and businesswoman died in 2009. The only child of Dr. Rubin and Ada Carver Poage, she was born in 1915. She completed high school as valedictorian and was piano accompanist at her own graduation. Achauer received academic degrees from Truman State University, the University of Missouri and University of Nebraska. She married Reynolds Achauer in 1942, and together they operated Vernaz Drug Store and the Annex Restaurant in Warrensburg for more than 30 years. They had two children, Bruce, who died in 2002, and Ann Achauer Maidment, who lives in Toledo, Ohio.

During her 50 years of living in the house, Achauer brought together thousands of people from all walks of life. Every homecoming, her home was the place to be, as students, faculty, staff, alumni, friends and their families packed bleachers set up on her front lawn just for the occasion.
Achauer received the UCM Distinguished Service Award in 1994, was an early participant in the launch of Johnson County’s community health program and a member of KMOS-TV’s first advisory council. She was one of the first members of the UCM Foundation Presidents Society and spearheaded fundraising for the suites at Walton Stadium. She also contributed the funds to build the White Rose Pavilion at the National Sigma Tau Gamma Headquarters in Warrensburg and the fraternity named the 1987 National Conclave in her honor.

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