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November 27, 2018

Turn of the Century, Orphan Trains from NYC Came to Warrensburg, Holden and the Midwest

CBS Orphan Trains Report

They rode the Orphan Trains New York's homeless children sought better lives in the Midwest. Many found the home they never had with families in Missouri and other states.

Marion Bright 1909 Warrensburg MO. 
1909 Tamre Brooks taken by Abbey Clark Bright and her brother Ed may have been involved. (from official records)
A.C. Augustus "Gus" Bass - Warrensburg.
National_Orphan_Train_Complex
A. C. came to Missouri in a controversial late 1800′s to early 1900's program that sent trainloads of young orphans from the East Coast to the Midwest. Adopted by the Young family who preceded the Cheatham’s in the banking industry, A. C. would go on to serve our country in World War I and become the State Commander of the American Legion.

Augustus C. "Gus" Bass
Orphan Train Adoptee
Warrensburg, Missouri
American Legion Commander Photograph 1946


Augustus Bass, Warrensburg, MO 1896, Mrs. Russell Magees lived with the Young family. (from official records)
Children from New York's orphanages came to the Midwest by the trainload in a huge migration that lasted 75 years. Estimates put the number of children relocated at 150,000 to 400,000, with some 100,000 coming to Missouri.
Orphan Train Video
 Picture the plight of the poor immigrant coming to America in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In most cases they left poverty and oppression. Unfortunately they often discovered conditions were little better in the new world The immigrants found few jobs. There was no labor union, no sick leave, no insurance. A steady supply of willing replacements meant low wages and appalling conditions. Worse, dangerous jobs meant numerous accidents and no safety net for those who suffered disabilities.

In 1854 estimates put the number of homeless children in New York City at 34,000. Clearly, something had to be done for this class of people called "street Arabs" or "the dangerous classes".Small wonder the children of these families suffered terribly. Many found their parents unable to care for them, and in desperation turned to the streets to sell newspapers, beg for food or steal to get by.





Moved by what he saw around him, Charles Loring Brace founded the Children's Aid Society of New York in 1853. Ordained as a Methodist minister, Brace decided at age 26 that he wasn't cut out to preach. He found his calling instead among the cast-off waifs of New York City.
He tried to establish schools to teach them skills they would need to find work. But attendance was poor and few learned a trade.
No amount of orphanages could hold all the homeless children. But Brace had an idea. He wanted to send as many children as possible west to find homes with farm families.
"In every American community, especially in a western one, there are many spare places at the table of life," Brace wrote. "There is no harassing struggle for existence. They have enough for themselves and the stranger too."
Brace's plan was simple. He would send notices to Midwest towns announcing the time and data a train-load of orphans would be arriving. The trains would leave New York City carrying the children and two adult agents from the society.
Orphan Train
Wanted
HOMES for CHILDREN
A company of homeless children from the East will arrive at
TROY, Missouri., ON FRIDAY, FEB. 25th, 1910








These children are of various ages and of both sexes, having been thrown friendless upon the world. They come under the auspices of the Children's Aid Society of New York. They are well disciplined, having come from the various orphanages. The citizens of this community are asked to assist the agent in finding good homes for them. Persons taking these children must be recommended by the local committee. They must treat the children in every way as a member of the family, sending them to school, church, Sabbath school and properly clothe them until they are 17 years old. The following well-known citizens have agreed to act as local committee to aid the agents in securing homes:
O. H. AVERY   E. B. WOOLFOLK   H. F. CHILDERS
WM. YOUNG   G. W. COLBERT
Applications must be made to, and endorsed by, the local committee.
An address will be made by the agent. Come and see the children and hear the address. Distribution will take place at the
Opera House, Friday, Feb. 25, at 1:30 p.m.
B. W. TICE and MISS A. L. HILL, Agents, 105 E. 22nd St., New York City. Rev. J. W. SWAN, University Place, Nebraska, Western Agent
The advertisement on which the above is based appeared in the Troy Free Press Feb 11, 1910. Troy, Missouri is in Lincoln County.
As the train made its stops the children would be paraded in front of the crowd of onlookers. Some needed another farm hand. Others genuinely wanted to give a child a home. The train left a small part of its cargo at each stop until finally all the children found homes. The first such "orphan train" went to Dowagiak, Michigan, in 1854. The trains would run for 75 years with the last one pulling into Trenton, [Grundy County] Missouri in 1929.
Missouri's location as a railroad crossroads made it the perfect destination for many trains. Researchers estimate 150,000 to 400,000 orphans were sent west. As many as 100,000 may have been placed in Missouri.

Orphans Boarding the Trains like this one came to 
Warrensburg, Holden -  Missouri and into Kansas 
Brace's group wasn't the only one sending orphans to the rural Midwest. Catholic Charities of New York also got into the act, perhaps because they saw Catholic children being placed in Protestant homes. In 1869 the Sisters of Mercy started the New York Foundling Hospital. Soon the Catholic group was sending its own "mercy trains" west.
While following Brace's lead, the Catholic trains differed in that they found homes for the children before they left New York. The parish priest served as the screening committee. He would announce the trains from the pulpit and those who wanted a child signed up, specifying whether they wanted a boy or a girl.
One of the orphans who came to Missouri from the Foundling Hospital was Irma Craig Schnieders. Irma arrived in Osage City [Osage County] in May of 1901 when she was just shy of her third birthday. She had the number 32 pinned to her dress. The George Boehm family from nearby Taos [Cole County] had a matching number.
Irma told her children that she was pampered by her new family. She loved them and in return was loved by her foster parents. In the home German was spoken, and Irma had to learn the new language.
Her foster mother died when Irma was 10 and she went to live with a second family. She was accepted by the community, went to St. Francis Xavier School until eighth grade and was class valedictorian. She went to college at what was then the Warrensburg Normal School, became a teacher, married and raised eight children.
Hers was a happy tale, as was that of Mary Ellen Pollock, an orphan train rider who spoke June 14, 1997 at a reunion of orphan train riders and their descendents in Taos.
Mary Ellen came to Sedalia [Pettis County] in 1923 because the agent, the Rev. J. W. Swan, knew her grandparents who lived there. She was five months old when she rode the train west, and a couple from East St. Louis adopted her. They never told her she was adopted.
One day while her mother was at a church meeting Mary Ellen opened the strongbox she knew was in the closet. Inside she found her adoption papers. She was around 10 years old, but kept the secret without ever telling her parents she knew.
"Back then children were seen and not heard," she said. "No one in the family ever mentioned it though they must have known. It didn't bother me. I had a good life."
She remembers that whatever she asked for she usually got, "not because they were rich but because they did without."
Others were less fortunate. Jessie Teresa Martin of Hays, Kansas says orphans like her were "a disgrace to the town. We were told, 'no one likes you; your mother didn't.'"
Jessie was 9 days old when her mother took her to the New York Foundling Hospital. When she was 4 she rode an orphan train to Kansas and found a new home. While she didn't feel loved, she was treated well.
In 1979 Jessie began searching for her relatives. That's when she discovered her parents had been Jewish, and that they had named her Jessie. (Her foster parents named her Teresa.) "My mother was Jewish. They took all religions (at the hospital) but you didn't leave until you were Catholic."
Today Jessie embraces both faiths, wearing a cross and a Star of David wherever she goes. "There was a time when I didn't have a relative in the world," she says. "Now I have 14 grandchildren and 29 great-grandchildren."
No one knows why the orphan trains ended. A 1901 Missouri law banning them certainly wasn't effective because it was never enforced. Most likely the social programs that came about in the 1930s made them unnecessary.

In many cases the orphan train experiment was successful, in others the right match of foster parent and orphan didn't happen. There were instances of abuse and neglect, forced labor and not enough food.
But there were far more who opened their doors for all the right reasons, like the Markway family of Wardsville [Cole County] which had 12 children but found room for one more. The orphan trains represented one of the most tragic and at the same time heartwarming stories in Missouri's history.
The story of the orphan train has a place in the history of just about every Missouri town located anywhere near a railroad. These tales of kindness and cruelty, of hope amid the despair are being preserved so that others can know the orphan train story.
From Rural Missouri, July 1997. Reprinted with permission.
For more information about the orphan trains, contact The Orphan Train Heritage Society of America, 614 East Ema Av., Suite 115, Springdale, AR 72764.

We are hoping to make a connection and piece our lost family together.
Between 1910 and 1911 in New York 2 siblings were place out and on the Orphan Train to Missouri.
They were Elizabeth S Fuller born about 1904/1905 and her brother William C Fuller Born about 1907, both in New York. They are said to have about 5/6 other siblings. Family story is that due to financial problems they being the youngest they were given up. They arrived in Warrensburg Missouri.They were lucky to both be taken in by John Millar and wife Mary and raised by them.
Both are deceased now but the family is trying to fill in the pieces of there family before Missouri. We are contacting all the agencies that may have had involvement and of course the Orphan Train Group.
We are seeking to find any family of the siblings that were left behind.The children that made there way to Missouri were young and remembered little except the train ride.
If there is anyone out there who this sounds familiar to, PLEASE CONTACT ME. There is family out there looking
Thanks, VaGirl

‘Sent West’: An American orphan story

While studying a 19th-century record book of children from the orphanage in my old New Jersey neighborhood, I noticed that a number of them ended up a long way from the Garden State.
Every so often a group of names appeared with repeated notations in the “where sent” column:


To Columbus, Missouri.
With J.P. Brace to Columbus, Missouri.

To Warrensburg, Missouri.

In one case, six children all carried the same notation:

Sent West With Children’s Aid Society.


Anyone familiar with studies of foundlings in 19th-century America would look twice at that.
Founded in New York City by Charles Loring Brace in 1853, the Children’s Aid Society promoted a radically different vision of child welfare from what prevailed before. Brace rejected the almshouse/workhouse model of warehousing the poor. Instead, he believed programs should nurture children and encourage self-sufficiency. He championed free kindergartens, job training, reading rooms, supervised lodging houses for boys — and the Orphan Trains.

Orphans recently arrived in the West. Image in collection of National Orphan Train Complex, Concordia, Kansas.
The basic plan, begun in 1853, was to relocate impoverished urban children to farm families in rural areas. New England and rural New York State were early destinations. After the Civil War, the emphasis shifted westward. Between 1865-74 nearly 1,000 children per year were sent to Missouri, Kansas, Iowa, Michigan and other Midwestern states.
Missouri and Kansas are the two states specifically mentioned in the ledger for the Children’s Home in my neighborhood, and several other entries say only “West.”
In a few entries, a “J.P. Brace” is listed as accompanying the children westward. This strengthens the possibility of the home’s link with the Orphan Trains. James P. Brace was Charles’ brother, and one of the most prominent of the “Western Agents” who shepherded Orphan Train children to the West. When James died in 1881 of a fever contracted in Missouri during one of his Orphan Train trips, the New York Times eulogized him: “The thousands of boys who journeyed with him from the great Metropolis, where sin and temptation abound, to the West, where through his influence, bright and happy homes awaited them, will ever remember him with thankful hearts.”

Not everyone agreed with that, even during the Brace brothers’ lifetimes. Some modern scholars contend that the Orphan Train movement often equated poverty with bad parenting, pressuring the poor to surrender children to the trains to “give them a real chance,” rather than emphasizing ways of keeping families together. Some children were abused and exploited. (There were also success stories. Two Orphan Train boys, John Brady and Andrew Burke, eventually became governors of Alaska and North Dakota, respectively.)
The ledger I studied contained both kinds of orphanage stories — those that ended with a parent finding their feet and reuniting the family, and those that ended with a child being surrendered to adoption and, perhaps, a journey west. Although the Children’s Home worked closely with the Orphan Train movement, it didn’t seem to rely on its philosophy totally.
When I was a child, the big Victorian was a place where we played hide-and seek and rode our bicycles. I never would have imagined it as a staging point for the frontier. But that, apparently, is what it was for some of the children who came there long ago.
Further reading: The National Orphan Train Complex website includes wonderful illustrations and educational materials. The Children’s Aid Society’s official site contains an overview of Brace and his career. Finally, here is a detailed look at the orphans and how they ended up on the trains.

The Orphan Trains PBS info
Missouri Orphan Trains File transcribed and contributed for use in the
Orphan Train Heritage Society of America, Inc. USGenWeb Archives by Mary Ellen Johnson, director
USGENWEB NOTICE: In keeping with our policy of providing free information on the Internet, material may be freely used by non-commercial entities, as long as this message remains on all copied material, AND permission is obtained from the contributor of the file. These electronic pages may NOT be reproduced in any format for profit or presentation by other organizations. Persons or organizations desiring to use this material for non-commercial purposes, MUST obtain the written consent of the contributor, OR the legal representative of the submitter, and contact the listed US
GenWeb archivist with proof of this consent.
Birth First Name Birth Surname Adopted/Other Surname Adopted? 

Birth year Town taken to State taken to Year taken on the train Person submitting information

Walter Adair? Linhorst yes 1904 Hillsboro MO 1913 Judith Biegner Edmund J. Anderson Grimes? 1877 Neosho MO 1889 Neosho Newspaper agent Mr. Trott placed by CAS Viola May Avery/Every 1883 Racine MO 1898/99 
Eda Olney lived with Gilstrap family Mary Bailey Smith? 1876 Neosho MO 1889 Neosho Newspaper agent Mr. Trott placed by CAS Henry Benjamin Bartlett 1873 Maryville MO 1881 Evelyn Bartlett Flood granddaughter

Augustus Bass America Baschetta Testerman? 1880 Neosho MO 1889 Neosho Newspaper agent Mr. Trott placed by CAS.
Warrensburg MO 1896 Mrs. Russell Magees lived with the Young family
Dorothy Mae Baylord Crenshaw 1898 Maitland MO Beulah Still
Dorothy Bond McPike yes 1902 Vandalia MO 1910 Elenore Shewe stayed with twin sister, Susie 

Edith Beatty 1900 Mexico MO 1907 Dorothy Hougland
August Bowers No 1865 Fayette MO 1908 Allie Mae Dickey relationship-daughter; had 1 brother and 2 sisters Susie Bond McPike yes 1902 Vandalia MO 1910 Elenore Shewe stayed with twin sister, Dorothy
Francis Brogan 1899 Jefferson City MO 1900/1901 Jeannine Stegeman George Boyle 1889 Mound City MO Louise E. Heck lived with William Praisewater family Frank William Brower No 1881 Neosho MO 1873 Harvey Brower relationship-grandson
James Burleson Cuba MO June Albrecht had a brother placed in another state Harold Brummer 1900? Plattsburg MO 1888? Helen Farr lived with Dan Loutermilcks family Margaret Burke No 1908 St. Louis MO 1904 Margaret Carstens OTR Isiah Ansen Cale Warren Counts 1915 Mt. Vernon MO 1912 Mrs. Violet L. Counts born in Kingston NY
William Noble Cawthorn 1863 Princeton? MO 1903 Elsie Nelson brother: Isaac; lived with Gilbert family Gracie Campbell Brown 1900 Joplin MO 1903 Iris M. Goucher Mabel Carmody Wallace 1898 Tarkio MO 1880s Dixie J. Cook Mabel Carmody 1899 Tarkio MO 1908 Dianne Pier born in NJ relationship-great niece Edward Chester 1881 Quitman MO 1917 Marjory Wheeler

Peter Cornell 1854 Burlington Junction MO 1861 Charles Cornell born in Schoharie Co., NY Bessie Cohen/Kahn Rose Mary Gentges 1899 Frankenstein MO 1899 Geraldine Robertson Rose Colen? Hazel Marie Becker 1909 St. Charles MO 1884 Hazel McCann OTR Elizabeth Conlin Bessie Elizabeth Bartmess 1894 Milan MO 1897? Eunice Reeser married name: Stroh
Henry Delong 1885 Kirksville MO Rhoda Prall lived with Rudd family Irma Craig 1888 Osage City MO 1901 Shirley Andrews relationship-daughter married name Schneider Edith Curran 1902 Versailles MO 1897 Mary Ann Meek Annie Davis 1882 Mexico MO 1901 Ken Polston lived with White family; married name: Fox Alfred Dean Conine? 1882 Neosho MO 1889 Neosho Newspaper agent Mr. Trott placed by CAS
Mary Katherine Eidman or Eidmon 1900 Slater MO 1907 Gary Wayne Dennis relationship-grandson Burford Dine King City MO Mary Sealey Ezekial Dougherty 1879 Fairfax MO 1913 Mrs. Albert Evans lived with Jerry and Florence Evans Annie Driscoll Otto 1898 Lynn MO 1909? Jeri Sorenson Anna Dulio Tindill Greenfield MO Valparaiso, IN Newspaper 2-Mar-98 William Dunlap William Dunlap Taylor 1898 Rockport MO Carlon and Vicky Taylor
Alfred Bernard Fexeck Frazier no 1907 Salisbury MO Holly Seiler "JW Swan transported us-put name tags on our sleeves" ran away at 16 Leela Mable Eisele no 1896 Centralia MO 1908 Russell Plybon placed by CAS with Arison and Ellen Burnette Emma Farren MO Ruthena Grimes lived with Bridewell family John Farron or Farrin John Farron Longdon 1890 Lexington MO 1922 James Duncan name on 1900 census was John Houston Steve Ferns 1889 St. Elizabeth MO 1901 Luella Buhman possibly had an older sister
Matilda Frank Rose Ellen Rogers No 1892 Higginsville MO 1860? Rosemary Keys Ernest Finger Ernest Henry Howes Yes 1897 Kirksville MO 1912 E. Gene Howes relationship-son; 2 brothers, Floyd and an older one Christopher C. Fitzgerald same 1856 Breckenridge MO Dr. Paul R. Fitzgerald 2 sisters: Julia and Mary Harvey Flanagan Harry Leo Harritz 1897 Marceline MO 1889 Sara Deatherage died at age 26 in train accident Mary Elizabeth Frances Dorothy/Dot Luesley 1897 Springfield MO Thomas Purnell, Jr. married name: Purnell
John Hamilton 1885 Marshall MO John R. Walden Margaret Gibbs? Furst 1902 St. Charles MO Leona Smith Emily Gindele Clinton MO Patty Dromeshauser Mary Gindele Clinton MO 1877 Patty Dromeshauser Robert Walter Goodwin no 1872 St. Louis MO 1872-1880 Robert Walter Goodwin III 4 brothers William Orm Graff 1905 MO James Bishop Henry Seward Gridley Sisson Yes 1900 Bowling Green MO 1925 Tom W. Sisson relationship-son Mabel Elizabeth Gumersell Erickson 1896 Mound City MO Norma Poling
Erath Heild Gruber? 1879 Neosho MO 1889 Neosho Newspaper agent Mr. Trott placed by CAS Frank Hanko Frank Hanko Brown 1885 Neosho MO Rosemary Garretson relationship-daughter; had 1 brother and 1 sister T. Sidney Harvey Harley 1906 Centralia MO 1883 T. Sidney Harley OTR; had 1 sister Emily; lived w/ Dr. S. E. Harley family Joseph Hastely 1892 Pilot Grove MO 1887 Lawrence Lang baptized on March 16, 1892 in NYFH chapel Phillip Hatt Allen? 1876 Neosho MO 1889 Neosho Newspaper agent Mr. Trott placed by CAS Ida Heild Gruber? 1883 Neosho MO 1889 Neosho Newspaper agent Mr. Trott placed by CAS

Sophia Marie Kaminsky/Kamin/Kaminski Greim Yes 1915 Springfield MO 1914 Sophia Kral OTR Thomas Ernest Higham Ernest Thomas Eddleman No 1903 Vandalia MO 1906 Mrs. Velma Schutz Elizabeth Jane Hobbs 1862 Eaglesville MO Sr. Anne Brigid relationship-great granddaughter Augustine Hoffman 1898 Brinktown MO 1925 mary Otto lived with Anna Brink family Henry Hopkins 1890 Monett MO Henry Hopkins Frank Howard 1859 Clark County MO Frank Howard taken in by Mr. Frazier who lived near Fairmont Ernest Howes MO Velma A. Coll Henry Jost Hopkins MO 1881 Annette Fry became mayor of Kansas City, MO in 1912

Mattice Lester Studer yes 1913 Falls City MO 1917/18 Lester Studer William Mattice came with Lester. Wm. Died 5/17/39 Anna Katz Richmond MO Betty Cary Brownfield brother Anthony, taken by neighbor farmer August Katz Richmond MO Betty Cary Brownfield German in origin, taken by Tennessee, Indiana, Ohio Anthony Lon Kemp King City MO Mary Sealey Celia or Cecilia Kimmick Krumrey Yes 1908 Ballwin MO Mary Ann Druhe relationship-daughter Monmouth Kinney Manning? 1875 Neosho MO 1889 Neosho Newspaper agent Mr. Trott placed by CAS William Knapp Shades 1911 Maryville MO 1895 Helen Shades sister, Eva Arthur Lawyer 1902 Savannah MO 1887 John W. Murphy Noah Lawyer? Lawyer? Sleeper MO 1914 Helen Berg

James Lewis McCarthy 1896 MO 1911 James M. Melton relationship-son William Luster No 1897 St. Louis MO Della Luster Lang relationship-daughter; had a brother, Jesse Jennie MacDowell Holman yes Lebanon MO 1910 History of Laclede Co., Missouri placed in the home of Joe and Belle Holman of Orla Harry MacDowell Lebanon MO 1910 History of Laclede Co., Missouri sister was Jennie Holman, placed in home on other side of town Marie Martin Stahlschmidt 1899 West Alton MO Anita Stimac Clarence Martine Walcott? 1876 Neosho MO 1889 Neosho Newspaper agent Mr. Trott placed by CAS Addie McAndrew Thrykill MO Mardelle M. Davis relationship-granddaughter

Richard Miller 1885? Fayette MO 1896 Sandra Maenner lived with the Thompson family William McCarty 1867 Roanoke MO 1877 William McCarty picked up on the streets of NY with other boys placed with James Robertson Otis Royal McGaw 1902 Wright County MO 1910 Ann Duckworth Had a sister named Helen McGaw William Menshon Normile? 1874 Neosho MO 1889 Neosho Newspaper agent Mr. Trott placed by CAS Frank Paul Michalson Tingler 1882 Maryville MO 1903 Leland Puttcamp lived with Tingler family; brother, William Jacob Gretchen Mikel Murphy? 1875 Neosho MO 1889 Neosho Newspaper agent Mr. Trott placed by CAS Robert Miles Robert Frances Summers 1891 Lexington MO 1891-1897 Robert Francis Summers II Placed with Luke and Mary Ellen Summers

Amelia (Emily) Obrieste Starke 1897 Dixon MO 1913 Ruth Starke Leonard Milton, Wilton? Leonard Winget yes 1906 Versailles MO 1913 Leonard Winget placed through the CAS and taken by Ulysses Grant and Fannie Winget Charles James Monroe 1896? Springfield MO 1923-24 Lucille Monroe Garrett Charles Moss 1883 Stansberry MO Darlene Simpson had a brother Elijah Nelson Zannow 1881 Oronogo MO Virginia Charleston Carrie Ness Sevier? 1875 Neosho MO 1889 Neosho Newspaper agent Mr. Trott placed by CAS Alfrieda Newholm Sullivan 1910 Lamar MO Alfrieda Smith Edward John Newman Trenton MO 1929 Newman Brothers OTR found a brother, Peter Smith in Rogersvillem MO Frank Nyburg Dickey? 1875 Neosho MO 1889 Neosho Newspaper agent Mr. Trott placed by CAS Gustav Ornes 1902 Versailles MO 1889 Lynne L. Ornes Norman Ornes MO 1909 Velma A. Coll had 3 brothers

Albert Richter No 1890 Freeburg MO 1892-93 Bernice Chappie relationship-daughter Norman Ornes MO 1909 Velma A. Coll had 3 brothers William Outwater Cloud? 1881 Neosho MO 1889 Neosho Newspaper agent Mr. Trott placed by CAS George T. Outwater Manning? 1879 Neosho MO 1889 Neosho Newspaper agent Mr. Trott placed by CAS Jason Outwater Bradfield? 1883 Neosho MO 1889 Neosho Newspaper agent Mr. Trott placed by CAS Desdemona Patterson Schoenborn? 1879 Neosho MO 1889 Neosho Newspaper agent Mr. Trott placed by CAS Katherine Peckman Monroe City MO Annette Fry placed in the home of Lute and Maud Fitchen Julia Pepple Watts 1898 Osage City MO Mrs. Donald Joannes married name: Koetting George Wendell Reiss 1887 Mountain Grove MO 1904 Wendell B. Reiss brother Louis stayed in NY Albert Richter No 1890 Freeburg MO 1892-93 Bernice Chappie relationship-daughter

James Edward Rimmer 1869 MO Harriett Rimmer Joyce Rifenberg Greenfield MO Helen Berg father named Howard Rifenberg Joyce Rifenberg Greenfield MO Helen Berg father named Howard Rifenberg Howard Rifenburg Lebanon MO 1909 History of Laclede Co., Missouri Lucy Rifenburg Lebanon MO 1909 History of Laclede Co., Missouri mother died and father was in the coal mines Nelson Rifenburg Lebanon MO 1909 History of Laclede Co., Missouri came in a group of 12 children Steve Rifenburg no Lebanon MO 1909 History of Laclede Co., Missouri placed in the home of Joel Davis of Morgan Virgil Rifenburg Lebanon MO 1909 History of Laclede Co., Missouri Hazel Ethel Riley Nicholas 1896 Burlington Junction MO 1925 Marty E. Goodwin relationship-g/granddaughter; had 1 brother, Robert William Riley Springston 1875 Troy MO 1899 Richard Springston

Carmen Shanahan Roloff yes 1914 Brookfield MO 1916 Marjorie Bagley placed through NYFH and adopted by Robert Roloff Emma Roe Elkins or Elkinhhaus 1899 Mound City MO 1901 Emma Elkins born to Christopher Elkinhaus and Catherine B. List Catherine Agnes Rowe (Roue) Nold Yes 1893 Pilot Grove MO Wanda Donaghue relationship-granddaughter Stella M. Sarten Stella M. Rinker Aurora MO 1900 Mrs. Gene Reid married name: Reid Frank Schuman Needham 1880 Pierce City MO Shirley James relationship-granddaughter; 3 siblings: Charles, Henry, Annie Sadie Schwartz/Swartz Bruckerhoff 1908 St. Louis MO Sadie Miederhoff married name: Brandel/Miederhoff Olga Sebala Anna Faye Popbes 1921 Monroe City MO Ann Wheat Francis Seiglar/Siglar Jimmy Johnson 1918 Maryvale MO 1893 Charlotte Jones Sophia Selle Obermeyer Savannah MO 1908 Ann Taylor.



Herman Julius Selle 1894 Savannah MO 1908 Ann Taylor James John Shea 1892 Ritchey MO 1895 Rose Mary Timbrook relationship-daughter born in Binghamton, NY placed through NYFH 

Charles Webber Smith? 1877 Neosho MO 1889 Neosho Newspaper agent Mr. Trott placed by CAS CeCelia Sheehan Bell 1892 Higginsville MO 1907 Mrs. John Senko, Jr. had an older brother Fred Filmore Shoaf 1909 Farmington MO 1871 Bonnie H. Shoaf brother, Author Ray Shoaf Annie Smith Miller? 1879 Neosho MO 1889 Neosho Newspaper agent Mr. Trott placed by CAS Charles St. John 1869 Spring Hill MO Shelly St. John Myrtle Standlea King City MO Mary Sealey Anna Sophia Stoning Stitt Burlington Junction MO 1898 Roberta Hahn sister Ella was also adopted; lived w/ Stitt family Rethal Ethel Turner No 1883 Jenkins/Galena/Cassville MO Frances Farley relationship-granddaughter; current last name: Larkin Rethel (Ethel) Turner Barry County MO Frances Sheldon Rethel (Ethel) Turner Barry County MO Geri Applegate Cornelius Van Tassel/Tassle 1906? Maryville MO Mary Mahg Ethel May Ward Fitch 1890 Ada MO Sue McIntire granddaughter William Weber Stilwell 1909 Butler MO Evelyn Stanfill John Joseph Welsh 1889 Pierce City MO Mary L. Droska relationship-daughter

Philopena Platzer 1897 Paris MO 1906 Philopena Platzer Mary Ann Wheeler 1890 West Plains MO Willard E. Innis lived with Davidson family Jennie Elizabeth Williamson Landreth 1910 Neosho MO Jean Landreth Sexton had 2 brothers: William and Kirk and sister, Alice Oliver Wright Gray 1915 Maryville MO 1921? Oliver Gray siblings: Greta, Harry, Marshall Harry Alfred Wright Pistole Yes 1911 Maryville MO 1900 Harry A. Pistole Vera Wright Lamar MO 1902/03 Republican Sentinel Robert Allen 1875? Harrisonville MO Mary Brackinridge he had 4 brothers and sisters, a twin brother Marion Bright yes 1909 Warrensburg MO 1909 Tamre Brooks taken by Abbey Clark Bright-her brother Ed may have been involved Archie Diekhaus 1892 Higginsville MO Donald A. Dieckhaus lived with Eugene and Emma Dieckhaus Gerald Fears Trenton MO Glen Danielson Katherine Fortune 1889 MO Charles M. Miller may have the middle name of Irene or May


 
 Jennie Alice Holman Lebanon MO 1904 Donald Raymond, Jr. married name: Davis Henry G. Sisson Vandalia MO 1878 Peggy Diesel relationship-niece 

Lela Idell LaVine Schnegelberger No 1914 MO? Lela Idell Newcombe OTR Anna 1898? St. Peters MO Lucille Florman Homer 1893 possibly St. Louis MO 1902 Nancy Baty current name: Homer Owsley Jim? 1899 Stoddard MO 1875 Jimmie Sue Rogers current name: Jim Patrick Jones Lamar MO 1892 Doris Flaker agents traveling w/ group were: M/M C. E. Swan Irma Craig No 1898 Osage City, Cole County MO Shirley Andrews Relationship-Daughter David Graham Hoffman 1886? MO & TX Joan Willis Earl Clarence Shaw 1916? MO or AR Carrie Ann Shaw had a brother and sister he could remember-sister may be Margaret, he ran away from farm at 13 Martha or Mattie Stewart No 1862 MO or KS 1914 Carol Elledge Relationship-Granddaughter

Thomas Albert Hamilton 1858 MO or MT 1901? Gloria J. Jackson relationship-g/granddaughter; had 3 siblings.


November 26, 2018

1940 Johnson County Erects Building to House Community Center, National Guard Armory and Library, 1954 Building Burns

New Warrensburg Armory nears completion.Nearly finished at Warrensburg, Mo., is a new stone, $100,000 armory and community hall. It will serve as headquarters for the Warrensburg unit of the 128th field artillery of the national guard and also as a community hall for the city and Johnson County.


From the beginning, the county took the lead in financing the building calling on community organizations to help in the planning and fundraising.  An article dated April 22, 1937 listed other organizations who had been invited to have a member present for the general committee meeting:

Warrensburg - Odd Fellows, Rebekahs, Masons, Modern Woodmen, Eastern Stars, Elks, B. and P. W. Club, Daughters of 1812, Study Club, A. B. C. Club, Garden Club and City Beautiful Association;

Knob Noster - City administration and Chamber of Commerce;

County at large - County Homemaker Blubs and Johnson County Poultry Association, and the town administration of Centerview, Chilhowee, LaTour, Leeton and Kingsville. 
This workig committee advised the county judges in proceeding with plans and pushing to completion a memorial to the soldiers and sailors who served in the World War from the county as well as consideration to the erection of the community building.

From the beginning, the project was a tough sell to some groups.

But most pitched in to do their part.
It provided work for county residents during the last years of the depression.


 After construction began, county residents who did not live in Warrensburg grew increasingly discontented with paying taxes for a community building they felt they would not use.
However, the building was soon completed and residents from all over the county began using it for community affairs.  The "community building" became the "Warrensburg Armory" in the minds of the citizens after the attack on Pearl Harbor.


In 1954, the building burned down. 

Buddy Baker remembers the fire, "Wabbit (his brother Albert Baker) was in the National Guard and they were going to annual training the next day.  So he filled all of the vehicles with gas and parked the in the basement garage  Then he took out the batteries and put them on the charging line. That's what started the fire - all of those fumes and a spark from a battery.

"I was coming back from visiting my Granddad Narron in Columbia that night and I could see a light over Warrensburg before I got to Centerview. A little closer and I could see the flames.

"I was in civil defense then, so when I got home, I put on my little hat and my badge and went to the fire.  They told me to stand on the corner where Jaeger Tires is now and keep the crowd back.  Hell, I couldn't do nothing with them people.  They wouldn't listen to me and it was hot from the fire even up there so I went home."
A newspaper article reported:

National Guard Armory and County Library Destroyed By Fir Of Unknown Origin
November 11, 1954 (Star Journal

Damage estimated at $400,000 resulted last night when the Armory building, housing the Headquarters Company of the 35th Division of the Missouri National Guard and all its equipment and the Johnson County Public Library, was destroyed by a fire of undetermined origin.
Fireme using four fire trucks, two of them from the Sedalia Air Force Base, with seven fire hoses, fought the fire for four hours with the aid of 100 volunteers and saved a house on the north side of the Armory belonging to Mrs. O.J. Tapp.  The fire was first reported by Kenneth Harness of 106 West North Street, who said that, smelling smoke, he went into his back yard to investigate and saw smoke coming out all of the back windows of the Armory.
Call received at 8:11 p.m.
Firemen from the city fire department answere the call at 8:11 p.m. but when at 8:25 o'clock, it appeared that the blaze was getting stronger, a radio call was placed by Capt. George H. Boyd, Jr. assistant fire marshall of Sedalia Air Force Base to the base for help.  Two pumper trucks were dispatched by the base with the firemen on duty at the time.  Off-duty firemen went to the base to man the station there.
The blaze was apparently coming under control at 10:10 p.m. when it suddenly flared up as the gasoline tanks on the trucks belonging to the National Guard which were parked in the basement, blew up and set the main floor of the building ablaze.
From then on, the blaze was uncontrollable as the roof of the building caught afire and sparks began flying through the air.
Little Ammunition
Contrary to a report that was circulated last night and also was printed in a press association dispatch this morning, the building did not store any large quantities of ammunition.  According to Capt. J. C. Sutton, commanding officer of the unit, a small quantity of .22 caliber and a few rounds of .45 caliber pistol ammunition was stored in a steel-lined vault, and could not have harmed any person.
Sutton said that the wall of the vault did fall in the later stages of the fire, dumping the arms and ammunition onto the lower floor, but none was know to have gone off.
City firemen said that they saw what they thought to be magnesium flares shooting into the air but could not be sure if any ammunition went off.
17 trucks destroyed
Seventeen trucks stored in the basement of the building were destroyed.  Included were several large trucks valued at $7,000 each.  The trucks could not be gotten out because they were parked without the batteries in them according to regulations so that the batteries would not corrode.  There was not enough time to place the batteries in the trucks and drive them out, before the blaze became so strong as to make it impossible.




November 23, 2018

"Tip-Top Filling Station Murder" Warrensburg, MO Fire Chief Sam Burge Slain, December 1932, First Day at Work, Murderer Killed by a Posse



Highway 13 and 50 Highway (Business 50 Today) Where Taco Bell is Today.

SAM BURGE SHOT TWICE IN RESISTING BANDIT.

Former Fire Chief Identifies Harry Mason As His Assailant When Latter is Taken Into Hospital Room Friday Afternoon 
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Officers From Three Counties in Posse 
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A.E. Wakeman, Odessa Police Chief, Makes Arrest in Filling Station On Highway No. 40
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Prisoner Denies Any Connection With Holdup 
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Henry Mason (Jack Mann), who was arrested Friday morning at a filling station on Highway No. 40, five miles west of Highway No. 13 by A.E. Wakeman, chief of police at Odessa, was positively identified by Sam Burge at Oak Hill Sanitarium Friday afternoon as the man who shot him twice Thursday night in an attempt to rob him. Mason, who told officers that his home was in Kansas City, was taken into the hospital room by Deputy Sheriffs Bob Mosby and Ernest Austin. Burge immediately said, "Bob, that's the guy." a denial was made by Mason that he is the man. Burge was fully conscious at the time of the identification and was said by those at the sanitarium to be holding his own. The chances for recovery are against him, according to physicians. 
Oak Hill Sanitarium, 519 South Holden Street, Warrensburg, MO Where Same Burge Died. The Sanitarium was founded about 1911 by Dr. Harry Field Parker, one of the youngest graduates ever from Warrensburg High School.  A the age of 16 Dr. Parker was both a physician and a surgeon.  
The UCM Student Union sites on the grounds of this building. 
More on the fascinating life of Dr. Parker at the end of this story.



Mason was taken to the hospital room shortly before 1:30 o'clock and returned to the county jail. Prosecuting Attorney Harry J. Salsbury stated Friday afternoon that he was preparing a warrant charging Mason with assault with a deadly weapon with intent to kill, merely to hold Mason in jail, but that if Burge should die he will be charged with murder. Sam Burge, recently resigned chief of the Warrensburg, fire department, is in Oak Hill Sanitarium in a critical condition as the result of being shot twice in a tussle with a bandit who attempted to rob him as he was closing the Tip-Top filling station at the intersection of Highways 50 and 13 shortly after 11, o'clock Thursday night. Doctors hold little hope for his recovery Friday morning. It was the first night he had worked at the station since leaving the fire station Wednesday morning. Officers of Johnson, Lafayette and Pettis Counties and State Highway Trooper Ralph Cox were joined in an effort to trail the escaped bandit by citizens of Warrensburg, and George Eaton's bloodhounds of Kansas City.
TipTop Gas Station Top Left 1940
Warrensburg, Missouri
Arrest Man on Highway 40. A.E. Wakeman, Chief of police at Odessa and deputy sheriff, arrested a man in the Fortyville filing station five miles west of Highway 13 on highway No. 40, during the morning and brought him to Warrensburg, for questioning. He was placed in the county jail for further investigation when he changed his story a few times. Thirty-five #32 caliber bullets were taken from his pockets which were similar to those with which Burge was shot. Burge, succeeded in wrestling the gun from the bandit after he was shot and fired once at him as he was fleeing. It was believed at first that the bandit was wounded as he hesitated when the shot was fired. Mr. and Mrs. (Bessie Katherine Burge) Lonnie Rice, who operate the Tip-Top cafe near the filling station, heard Burge shout for help and as they looked out of the cafe saw the former fire chief wrestling with a man in the station driveway. They saw the man start running and Burge shoot at him. They ran to Burge's aid and the wounded man told them the bandit had gone North. Mr. and Mrs. Rice did not hear the three shots fired at the station, two of which hit Burge and the third puncturing a five-gallon can full of oil.  
Undergoes Operation. A physician was summoned for Burge who after the bandit fled walked into the station, took off his jacket and coveralls and sat down on a desk then officers were summoned. Burge was removed to Oak Hill and Dr. John F. Mackey of Kansas City was called to perform an operation. It was found that his intestines were punctured twenty-two times by the two bullets. The report on the shooting soon spread over the city and friends of the wounded man and citizens, quickly gathered at the station armed with guns and the search was commenced. Sheriff J. R. Black telephoned officers in nearby towns and called for Eaton's bloodhounds. The dogs were given the bandit's hat which was left in the station and quickly struck out towards the north, followed by a large group. The hounds followed the highway mostly, occasionally taking short trips into fields. The trail was lost at a house on the Highway North of 50, about seven miles North. 
Wrestle for Gun. Burge was closing the station for the night about 11 o'clock according to the story told to officers when a car drove by the driveway and the driver asked that the gasoline tank be filled. When this had been done the man offered to pay for the gas with a ten dollar bill. Burge stated he did not have change for the bill and asked the man if he had anything smaller. He said he didn't and Burge went into the station to get change for it. As he was reaching into the money sack, the driver of the car said "I'll take that money." Burge replied. "I guess you won't" as he turned around. The car driver reached for his pocket and Burge tried to stop him from getting the gun, jumped for him. 
Burge Wounded Gets Gun. They wrestled there in the office and the bandit succeeded in getting the gun, a small .32 caliber revolver, out of his pocket. The first shot entered a five-gallon can of oil near the bottom. It did not go through he can on the opposite side. The next two shots hit Burge in the stomach. The filling station attendant continued to fight for possession of the gun and they worked out into the driveway where Burge's shouts for help were heard. 
Tip-Top Service Station, Warrensburg, MO
Site of 1932 Murder of Fire Chief Sam Burge
He gained possession of the gun and fired at the fleeing bandit who ran north from the Station. Roy Burge, a brother, was given the bullet taken from inside the oil can. It was copper-tipped s were those taken from the pockets of the man held for questioning. 
Stole Car in Sedalia. The hat belonging to the bandit and lost in the station during the scuffle was tan and bore the name of Ed Switzer clothing store of Chillicothe. It was size 7 1/2. It was learned that the car which the bandit abandoned in the driveway of the station had been stolen from L. J. Brown, manager of the Kroger store in Sedalia. Sedalia officers who came to Warrensburg, upon the report that the car was here, stated that Brown was entering the car in front of the post office at Sedalia about 9:30 o'clock Thursday night when a man opened a door of the machine and at the point of a gun forced Brown to drive through the city and a half mile north on Highway No. 65. Brown was robbed of eighty cents and was forced to get out of the car and the bandit drove away. 

A 1932 Chevrolet, similar to the one stolen and used in the robbery/murder.
Odessa Chief Makes Arrest. The car was a 1932 Chevrolet coach and had been driven a little over 2,000 miles. It was reported stolen to the Sedalia police soon after it was taken. All cars were stopped on Highways 50 and 13 and at the junction of Highways 40 and 13 during the night and searched. Cars patrolled Highway No. 13 throughout the night. The bloodhounds arrived about 4:30 am and immediately set on the trail. They returned to the filling station in about two hours. Burge's coveralls showed two bullet holes near the waistline, one on each side of the buttons down the center. Chief Wakeman was attracted to the man he took into custody when he was told that a man on foot ate breakfast at a farmhouse early Friday morning and that his right hand was injured. When found in the filling station on Highway No. 40, the man said he had walked from Holden during the night and was on his way to Kansas City where he lived. He was nursing a cut on right hand between his thumb and first finger which he said was hurt when he fell while walking along a dark road during the night. He gave his name as Henry Mason and denied any knowledge of the shooting. 
Wearing Roommate's Suit. In explaining the thirty-five bullets found in his pockets, he said he was, wearing his roommates suit and that the bullets were in the suit when he put it on. He said he became lost when questioned as to what he was doing about seven miles east of Odessa. Allen Isaac, who has served on the fire department with Burge for many years, was at the station about 10 o'clock and ran an errand for him. He told of a stranger being in the station at that time, apparently loafing. The man left when he saw that Isaac was going to remain for a time. Isaac viewed the man taken into custody and said it was not the stranger, who was in the station about an hour before the shooting. Mrs. Burge, who is taking a course in beauty culture in Kansas City, was telephoned of the shooting and arrived in Warrensburg, within a short time after being told of what happened. Threats and talk of lynching Mason were heard from the crowd that filled the sheriff's office where he was being questioned by officers after his arrest by Chief Wakeman.
2. Newspaper Clippings

FUNERAL SERVICES MONDAY AFTERNOON BANDIT'S BULLET PROVES FATAL TO SAM BURGE. ----- Former Fire Chief Dies Saturday Morning of Wounds in Abdomen. ---- Pallbearers Will Be Members of Fire Department Who Served Under Him. ----- 
Samuel J. Burge, 33, until recently chief of Warrensburg, Fire Department, died at 9:30 o'clock Saturday morning as the result of being shot twice in the abdomen in a tussle with a bandit for the possession of a revolver in an attempted holdup about 11 o'clock Thursday night at the Tip-Top filling station at the junction of highways 50 and 13. Burge made a gallant fight to live but was given only an outside chance by physicians from the first. His intestines were punctured twenty-two times by the two bullets and rarely does a person injured that badly survive, according to Dr. John Mackey of Kansas City, who performed an operation on Mr. Burge, within a few hours after the shooting. Rites at Christian Church. Funeral services will be held at 2 o'clock Monday afternoon at the Christian church, conducted by the Rev. J.C. Hollyman, pastor of the Presbyterian church, assisted by the Rev. V.T. Wood, pastor of the Christian church. The pallbearers will be Harry Staley, Allen Isaac, Russell J. Jacobs, Louis Anderson, Buster Collins and Elbert Stump, all members of the fire department. Honorary pallbearers will be L.F. Hutches, Theodore Shock, Mayor H.R. Garrison, James French, C.L. Johnson and F.J. Rogers. The flowers girls will be Mrs. Allen Staley, Mrs. Russel Jacobs, Mrs. Harry Staley, Mrs. Russell Jacobs, Mrs Allen Issac, Mrs Buster Collins, and Miss Fern McMillard. 
Spent Life in County. There was considerable feelings against Burge's killer Saturday morning when word gradually spread of Burge's death. He was well and favorably known here, having spent his entire life north of town where he was born and in the city. He resigned Tuesday night as chief of the fire department after having served in that capacity for the past nineteen months. He was a member of the department, however, for approximately four years and had requested that he be reinstated as part time fireman when the first vacancy occurred. Burge was born September 8, 1899, the son of S.A. and Mary E. Burge, about ten miles north of Warrensburg . He was married to miss Annabelle Smith of Montserrat on October 14, 1929 in Warrensburg. He worked for the Warrensburg Oil Company operated by L.E. Hutchens for eight years and spent one year with the Phillips Petroleum Company driving the bulk truck after that company purchased the Warrensburg, Oil Company. He resigned that position to become fire chief. 
Shot First Night on New Job. Burge returned to his old job on the oil truck Wednesday morning and Thursday night, the night of the shooting, was the first he had worked at night. Fishing and hunting had been greatly enjoyed during the past summer and fall by Burge. He was proficient at both sports and games and fishing, were had by him frequently. He is survived by his widow and the following brothers and sisters: E.N. of Pittsville; W.R., and E.B., of north of Warrensburg; Mrs. C.N. Iseminger of Holden; Aaron of Ree Heights, S.D., and Mrs. Joe Claunch and Mrs. Ward Hathaway of Warrensburg. Burge regained consciousness at intervals, according to Dr. Parker. An autopsy was performed Friday and  one of the bullets removed.     
FILE MURDER CHARGE AGAINST JACK MANN
 ---- Man Identified by BURGE Taken to Kansas City Jail for Safe Keeping Friday Evening by Officers.----- CONDUCTING INQUEST AT COURTHOUSE TODAY. 
A coroner's inquest into the death of Samuel J. BURGE, was being conducted this afternoon by Dr. Edward Andruss, county corner, at the County Courthouse, Dr Andreuss is being assisted by Prosecuting Attorney Harry J. Salsbury and Nick M. Bradley, who has been retained by friends of BURGE to aid in the prosecution. The coroner's jury is composed of Allen Isaasc, George Hanna, L.F. Hutchens, Harry Staley, B.V. Asbinhurst and Harry Iseminger. A recess in the hearing was necessitated during the afternoon so that Harry Stanley, fire chief, might answer an alarm. -----  
A charge of murder in the first degree was filed against Jack Mann. alias Henry Mason. In connection with the fatal shooting of Sam BURGE Thursday night, following the latter's death Saturday Morning. The information was prepared by Prosecuting Attorney Henry J. Salsbury and signed and sworn to before Justice C.A. Harrison by Sheriff J. R. Black soon after word reached the courthouse of BURGE's death. Mann was taken to the Jackson County Jail in Kansas City by Deputy Sheriff's Bob Mosby and Ernest Austin for safe keeping when talk of lynching him was being hard about the streets. He maintained his innocence on the trip to Kansas City and said his name was Henry Mason. A check of address named Henry C. Mason, 4705 Belleview, Kansas City, was reported in the Kansas City Star Friday night. That name and address was given by Mann when brought to the sheriff's office here Friday morning, according to officers. Registered as Jack Mann. Mrs. Florence Shaffer, proprietor of the Lafayette Hotel in Odessa viewed the man Friday afternoon and identified him as the person who registered at the hotel on November 4, under the name of Jack Mann and gave Clinton as his home. Information charging Mann with an assault with a deadly weapon with intent to kill was prepared Friday by Prosecutor Salsbury merely to hold him in jail pending BURGE's condition. This was dismissed Saturday in favor of the more serious charges. 
Officer Tells of Capture. W.A. Wakeman Warrensburg __ related the events leading to Mann's arrest at a filling station on Highway 14. Sheriff J.R. Black after being called to the scene of the attempted holdup Thursday night immediately telephoned offices in all surrounding towns to be on the watch for the bandit and talked to Chief Wakeman in Odessa about 1 o'clock Friday morning. The chief informed the night-watchman of the shooting and at 8 o'clock that morning went to the telephone office and spread the alarm throughout the countryside near Odessa. When he called one party line, he was answered by Mrs. Henry Hook who lives about seventeen miles northwest of Warrensburg, , in Lafayette County. She related about a young man with an injured hand stopping at the Hook farm about daylight for breakfast. The man inquired of Mrs. Hook of the direction to Highway No. 14, saying that he wanted to go to Kansas City. he was given a ride to the Fortyville Filling station on the highway by Earl Wagner, according to Chief Wakeman. Arrested in the filling Station. The station is about seven miles east of Odessa and about four miles north of the Hook farm. Chief Wakeman in the company of two other men went immediately to the station and as the Odessa officer walked into the place, he readily recognized Mann from the description given him by Mrs. Hook. Mann has his right hand the one injured in his right hand pocket. After inquiring of the proprietor of the station about Mann, Chief Wakeman

BANDIT'S BULLET PROVES FATAL TO SAM BURGE ----- Former Fire Chief Dies Saturday Morning of Wounds in Abdomen ----- FUNERAL SERVICES MONDAY AFTERNOON ----- Pallbearers Will Be Members of Fire Department Who Served Under Him. Samuel J. BURGE, 33, until recently chief of Warrensburg, , Fire Department, died at 9:30 o'clock Saturday morning as the result of being shot twice in the abdomen in a tussle with a bandit for the possession of a revolver in an attempted holdup about 11 o'clock Thursday night at the Tip-Top filling station at the junction of highways 50 and 13. BURGE made a gallant fight to live but was given only an outside chance by physicians from the first. His intestines were punctured twenty-two times by the two bullets and rarely does a person injured that badly survive, according to Dr. John Mackey of Kansas City, who performed an operation on Mr. BURGE, within a few hours after the shooting. Rites at Christian Church. Funeral services will be held at 2 o'clock Monday afternoon at the Christian church, conducted by the Rev. J.C. Hollyman, pastor of the Presbyterian church, assisted by the Rev. V.T. Wood, pastor of the Christian church. The pallbearers will be Harry Staley, Allen Isaac, Russell J. Jacobs, Louis Anderson, Buster Collins and Elbert Stump, all members of the fire department. Honorary pallbearers will be L.F. Hutches, Theodore Shock, Mayor H.R. Garrison, James French, C.L. Johnson and F.J. Rogers. The flowers girls will be Mrs. Allen Staley, Mrs. Russel Jacobs, Mrs. Harry Staley, Mrs. Russell Jacobs, Mrs Allen Issac, Mrs Buster Collins, and Miss Fern McMillard.  

Spent Life in County. There was (considerable feelings against Burge's killer Saturday morning when word gradually spread of BURGE's death. He was well and favorably known here, having spent his entire life north of town where he was born and in the city. He resigned Tuesday night as chief of the fire department after having served in that capacity for the past nineteen months. He was a member of the department, however, for approximately four years and had requested that he be reinstated as part time fireman when the first vacancy occurred. BURGE was born September 8, 1899, the son of S.A. and Mary E. BURGE, about ten miles north of Warrensburg. He was married to miss Annabelle Smith of Montserrat on October 14, 1929 in Warrensburg . He worked for the Warrensburg, , Oil Company operated by L.E. Hutchens for eight years and spent one year with the Phillips Petroleum Company driving the bulk truck after that company purchased the Warrensburg, , Oil Company. He resigned that position to become fire chief. 
Shot First Night on New Job. BURGE returned to hid old job on the oil truck Wednesday morning and Thursday night, the night of the shooting, was the first he had worked at night. Fishing and hunting had been greatly enjoyed during the past summer and fall by BURGE. . He is survived by his widow and the following brothers and sisters: E.N. of Pittsville; W.R., and E.B., of north of Warrensburg; Mrs. C.N. Iiseminger of Holden; Aaron of Ree Heights, S.D., and Mrs. Joe Claunch and Mrs. Ward Hathaway of Warrensburg. BURGE regained consciousness at intervals, according to Dr. Parker. An autopsy was performed Friday and one of the bullets removed.

Name Mann as BURGE's Slayer 

---- Corner's Jury Connects Man Under arrest with Shooting in Attempted Holdup. ----- JURORS REACH DECISION WITHIN A SHORT TIME --- Bullet Taken From Body Similar to Those Found in Pocket of Prisoner. Jack Mann, alias Henry Mason, was named as the slayer of Samuel J. BURGE in the verdict returned by a coroner's jury at the courthouse late Saturday, afternoon. The six men required by seven and one-half minutes to make a decision after hearing several witnesses tell of various incidents in the shooting of BURGE when he resisted a bandit in an attempted holdup in the Tip-Top filling station about 11:00 o'clock Thursday night. The verdict as read by Lesile Hutchens, foreman of the jury, was: "We the jury, find that Sam J. BURGE came to his death by gun shot wounds inflicted by pistol shots in the hands of Jack Mann, alias Henry Mason, on the night of December 8th." It was signed by Hutchens, George Hanna, B.V. Ashinhurst, Allen Isaac, Harry Staley and H.L. Iseminger. Dr. Edward Andruss, county corner, conducted the inquest, assisted by Prosecuting Attorney Harry J. Salsbury and Nick M. Bradley, who has been retained by friends of BURGE to assist in the prosecution.  
No Date for Preliminary. The date for Mann's preliminary hearing has not been set but will probably be held some time this week. Mann will be kept in the Jackson County jail where he was removed Friday night for safe keeping, according to Sheriff J.R. Black. Dr. H.F. Parker, the first witness called, told of being summoned to attend BURGE, and gave details of the explanation of the crime as explained to him by BURGE. He further told of an emergency operation in an effort to save the injured man and he gave specific details of the injuries caused by the two shots fired into BURGE's abdomen. Dr. Parker explained the two shots had caused twenty-two perforations of the intestines and in some places the intestines were almost severed. The witness explained his patient rallied from the anesthetic about 8 o'clock Friday morning and at times through that day he was rational. During one of these rational periods Dr. Parker testified the prisoner was brought before BURGE and without any hesitation BURGE declared, "Bob that is the guy." The prisoner, the Witness testified, said "you are sending an innocent man to the penitentiary" to which BURGE replied "you can't fool me." Dr. Parker testified BURGE was conscious at the time and thoroughly capable of making an identification.  
Bullet Removed From Body. Dr. Parker testified that an autopsy had been conducted by himself after BURGE died and one of the bullets, resting near his spine was removed. The bullet, in the possession of the coroner, was identified as the one taken from the body of BURGE. It compares favorably, the witness stated with those bullets found on Mann when he was arrested. A.E. Wakeman, chief of police of Odessa, who arrested Mann, was the next witness called. He told of receiving word about 1 o'clock, Friday morning of the shooting and information that the bandit probably was headed i the general direction of Odessa. He told of notifying the operators at Odessa to be on the lookout for any information which might be of value in locating the fleeing man. He further told of broadcasting over the country lines a description of the man wanted, also the fact he was likely to be in the general vicinity of Odessa. When he was engaged in this broadcast Mrs. Henry Hook, who resides southeast of Odessa, informed him a man answering this description had eaten breakfast at her home that morning, and following breakfast the stranger had been taken by truck to Fortyville on Highway 40.  
Arrest Made in Station. Wakeman immediately went to Fortyville station and found Mann seated near a stove, waiting to catch a ride to Kansas City. The man was placed under arrest and Wakeman started to Warrensburg with the prisoner after the officer had determined Mann was unarmed. En route to Warrensburg, according to Wakeman, the prisoner denied any connection with the crime but several times asked if the man, who had been shot, was in a serious condition. Wakeman told he thought he was not. Wakeman further testified that he questioned Mann, who stated he had walked from Holden to the place of his arrest since 11 o'clock the night before. When questioned why he was east of Odessa, when trying to go to Kansas City, the prisoner replied he had become lost. The prisoner stated he was attempting to get to Odessa, where he knew a Mr. and Mrs. Shafer and a Mrs Elmer Abbott, who run a hotel there. Wakeman testified he questions Mann about the injury to his hand and the prisoner stated he had fallen and hurt his hand in the dark.  
Identify Him as Jack Mann. Wakeman told of returning to the Odessa Hotel after leaving the prisoner here and investigating the statement by Mann that he knew the people who run the hotel. Mr. and Mrs. Shafer and Mrs. Abbott stated they did not know a "Henry Mason." the name given by Mann following his arrest, and Mrs. Abbott came to Warrensburg, and viewed the prisoner in jail. She immediately stated "why that is Jack R. Mann." An investigation of the register by Wakeman, proved that Mann had registered at the hotel on two occasions as J.R. Mann .F.F. Robinson, Odessa, who accompanied Wakeman to Fortyville and later to this city, next took the stand and testified in general to details as given by Wakeman. He added a further statement, which officers consider important, when he stated the prisoner asked him "do you think the filling stations attendant can identify anyone." Also at another time he asked if the injured man was conscious.  
Hat and Tie Marks Similar. Sheriff Rube Black was the next witness called. He gave details of being called to the scene of the shooting, immediately after it happened what he saw there, also the description of the crime and bandit as given him by BURGE. Sheriff Black further testified about the work of the bloodhounds in following a trail north to Highway No. 13 to a point about eight miles, where the trail was lost. The point where the trail was lost is only a few cross country miles from the Hook farm. Sheriff Black identified a hat which had been left by the fleeing bandit, and then identified a tie which had been taken of Mann following his arrest. In both the hat and the tie were trade marks showing both articles had been bought from Ed Switzer, Chillicothe, Mo. The witness testified the shoes worn by Mann when he was arrested also bore a Chillicothe trademark. Sheriff Black stated he had asked Mann about these articles and Mann disclaimed ownership of the hat and stated the tie he was wearing had been purchased in a pawn shop in Kansas City.  
Rice to Aid of BURGE. Lonnie Rice, who operates the Tip-Top cafe, near the filling station where the shooting took place, told of a visit to the station just shortly before, the attempted robbery was made. Rice testified he saw the man, who is alleged to have doe the shooting standing near the stove while he was in the station, but when asked if he could identify Mann he stated he could not. He said, however, Mann talks like the bandit, is about the same size and the clothing resembles that worn by the man he saw in the station. Rice further testified he and his wife saw a part of the tussle after BURGE and the bandit got outside the station. They viewed the fight thought a window in their cafe. Rice said he took his gun and rushed out of the back door of his place to aid BURGE. By the time he reached the station BURGE was staggering into the station and was told by BURGE the bandit had headed north on Highway 13. Rice called the telephone operator and told her to get the sheriff and a doctor and then he went outside and removed the keys from the bandit's car and from BURGE's car. He did this, the witness testified so the bandit could not come back and get one of the cars to make his get away. Rice state the hat found after the bandit disappeared was lying between a front light and the hood of the bandit's car, where it had been apparently knocked off during the scuffle. The last two witnesses at the hearing were Deputy Sheriffs Bob Mosby and Ernest Austin. They told of being called by Dr. Parker, who stated BURGE was conscious and able to view the prisoner. Mosby said he had known BURGE all the latter's life and that he believed him to be in his right mind while viewing Mann. Mosby led the procession into BURGE's room at the hospital Friday afternoon, flowed by Mann with Austin behind. Mosby testified that BURGE looked at them and said "Bob, that's the man."
Preliminary for Mann Thursday: Man Charged With Fatal Shooting to be Arraigned Before Judge Harrison at 2 P.M. ---- KEEP HIS RETURN TO CITY A SECRET. Lafayette and Pettis Counties Want Mann on Different Charges --- The preliminary hearing for Jack, Mann, alias Henry Mason, held in jail in Kansas City on first degree murder charges in connection with the fatal shooting of Sam Burge December 8 in an attempted holdup, will be held here Thursday after noon before Justice C. A. Harrison, it was announced by Prosecuting Attorney Harry J. Salsbury. When Mann will be brought to Warrensburg will not be known but Perry Jones, who will assume the duties of sheriff at midnight tonight, will likely bring him here sometime during the forepart of next week, possibly just before the hearing. Mann could avoid the hearing here by waiving it and it would be then the duty of Justice Harrison to bind him over for trial in the Circuit Court. His case would not come up then before the February term, which begins February 13. On the other hand it is possible Mann will take an effort to gain his freedom at the hearing at any rate the state will be called upon to present at least a portion of its evidence against him at the preliminary hearing. When talk of mob violence was heard on the streets here December 9, the day Mann was captured in a filing station on Highway No. 40, seven miles east of Odessa and brought to Warrensburg, Deputy Sheriffs Mosby and Austin took the prisoner to the Jackson County Jail in Kansas City where he has been held since.  

Identified as Bank Robber. Numerous request have been received at the courthouse for pictures and information on Mann and it is planned to have him photographed when he is brought here. Since being held in the jail in Kansas City Mann has been positively identified by the cashier and bookkeeper of a bank at Napoleon, Mo, in Lafayette County, as the person who held up the bank on November 5 and escaped with $583. Pettis County officials also have a claim against Mann. He is wanted in Sedalia on a charge of stealing an automobile. The person who attempted to rob Burge in the Tip-Top filling station at the Intersection of Highways 50 and 13, abandoned the car, which was stolen in Sedalia only a few hours before the robbery, and fled on foot after wounding Burge in the abdomen twice and losing the gun in a tussle.
ESCAPE FROM JAIL AT Warrensburg, ENDS IN DEATH FOR MURDERER Jack Mann, alias Henry Mason (insert) escaped from the Johnson County Jail at Warrensburg, Mo. by sawing a bar in a jail window, indicated by the arrow, allowing him to reach the roof of a kitchen adjoining the jail. He tied two sheets together and fastened them to another window, as show in the picture, and slid to the ground. Mann was shot to death later by two members of a posse at Centerview, Mo, six miles from Warrensburg. He was held on first degree murder charges in connection with the fatal shooting of Samuel J. BURGE in an attempted holdup of a filling station, near Warrensburg, the night of December 8, He also had been identified as the man who robbed the Bank of Napoleon, Mo 4/15/32.


An Escaped Slayer Killed 

------ Posse Overtakes Jack Mann., 
Who Sawed Out of Warrensburg Jail ---- 
(By The Star's Own Service) Warrensburg, Mo. March 14 - (Tuesday) --- About two hours after Jack Mann, alias Henry Mason, who had been held in jail here on a first degree murder charges, had sawed his way to freedom from a second floor window, he was killed by three members of a posse at Centerview, six miles west of here. Mann was accused of the slaying December 8 of Samuel J. Burge, a filling station attendant, in an attempted holdup. Man was arrested after an all night chase, and was identified at a hospital by the dying Burge as his assailant. About 10 o'clock last night, Mann climbed down a rope made of bed clothes after he had sawed away bars in his cell window. A posse of citizens was organized immediately by Perry Jones remained here to direct the hunt, offering $200 dead or alive for the return of the slayer. Shortly after midnight, Albert Bail, Everet Wade and William Bryant, each carrying a shotgun, saw a man apparently hiding in the stockyards at Centerview. They called to him to halt as he started to run. When he did not stop, all fired. The man fell and when they asked him who he was, he said: "I'm just a tramp."  They put him into their motor car and returned here. 
The man died on the way. Sheriff Jones identified the body of that of Mann's. When Mann was identified by Burge, threats of lynching were heard on the streets here and the prisoner was taken to the Jackson County Jail in Kansas City and kept there until the felling died down. After he was returned here, he underwent an appendicitis operation. The bandages were still on him this morning. Burge was slain his first night on duty at the filling station. He had resigned the same week as chief of the city fire department.

JACK MANN KILLED AFTER SAWING WAY OUT OF JAIL 

 ---- William Bryant and Albert Ball Fire Fatal Shots When Accused Slayer of Sam Burge Fails to Stop at Stockyards Near Centerview ---- ESCAPE DISCOVERED WITHIN SHORT TIME ----- Officers Puzzled On How Alleged Murderer Came in Possession of Saw --- Slid Down Rope Made by Tying Two Sheets Together Monday Night. ----- 
Jack Mann, alias Henry Mason, was shot to death near the stockyards at Centerview about midnight Monday as he was fleeing after sawing his way out of the Johnson County jail here. The fatal shots were fired from shotguns in the hands of William Bryant and Albert Ball, who had been deputized by Sheriff Perry A. Jones to aid in the search for the escaped prisoner. Mann's freedom lasted about two hours, he having made his escape about 10 o'clock Monday night by swing one bar on a window on the second floor of the new part of the jail. He reached the ground by tying two sheets together and fastening them to a bar on the window just south of the one through which he made his escape. More than 200 buckshot struck Mann in the six or seven shots fired by the two members of the posse. He died shortly after being shot, having been pronounced dead by Dr. W. R. Patterson, upon his being brought to Warrensburg by the posse who fired at him, and Everett Wade. Wade had taken Bryant and Ball to Centerview and was to pick them up later at one of the crossings between Warrensburg and Centerview. He had left them only a few minutes and was having gasoline put in his car in Centerview when he heard the shooting and joined his companions. The front of Mann's body between the neck and stomach was sprinkled with shot. He was also struck in the left arm and hand and the left leg about the knee on the outer side. Mann was being held here on a charge of first degree murder in connection with the fatal shooting of Samuel J. Burge in an attempted holdup of the Tip-Top filling station on the night of December 8. He was granted a change of venue recently and was to have been tried in Warsaw during the next term of court. Had not Sheriff Perry A. Jones gone to the second floor of the jail to turn two prisoners into the large cell room shortly after 10:15 o'clock Monday night after he returned from a liquor raid, Mann's escape would probably never have been discovered until breakfast time Tuesday morning and would have been successful.  
Prisoner Tell of Escape. As Sheriff Jones turned in his two prisoners, Bert Hastings, a federal prisoner from Springfield serving a short sentence on a liquor charge said, "I'm glad you've come Mr. Jones, Jack Mann just sawed out." Hastings said that Mann threatened to kill all of them if they said anything about his escape. There were six other prisoners in the large room but they did not try to follow Mann. Five of the group were serving sentences on various charges and the six was Rowland Burgan, who is being held on a first degree murder charge in connection with the fatal beating administered to Emmet Howard. All six were marched to the large cell room on the lower floor of the jail and Sheriff Jones immediately telephoned all surrounding towns and sheriffs in adjoining counties. He and his deputy, W.N. Burks, quickly organized possess and sent them in directions Mann was likely to have taken. Sheriff Jones remained at the jail to direct activities of the search. Before the searching parties left the jail that he would pay a reward of $100 for the return of Jack Mann dead or alive. Prosecuting Attorney Harry J. Salsbury said he would add another $100 to the amount.  
Saw Mann walking. Bryant, Ball and Wade were directed to go to Centerview in Wade's roadster and upon reaching there, walk east along the Missouri Pacific railroad tracks. Bryant and Ball left the car at the Centerview crossing and Wade was to pick them up at a crossing between Warrensburg and Centerview. Upon leaving Wade, Bryant and Ball walked along the tracks to the stockyards, about 125 yards from the crossing. Bryant circled the yards thinking Mann might be hiding there while waiting for a train, while Ball looked in box cars. As Bryant was finishing his tour of the yards he saw a man walking west along the tracks, fitting the description given by Sheriff Jones. It was moonlight and Bryant said he could make out that the person was wearing a sweater under his coat and that he was bareheaded. Bryant crouched down out of sight and as Mann reached a point in front of him about fifty feet away, he shouted halt and when Mann commenced running he shouted halt again and then fired. Ball was west of Mann about thirty yards on the tracks and heard Bryant shout. He saw Mann running toward him and opened fire with his .20 gauge automatic shotgun after Bryant first shot. Ball says he fired two or three times. Mann feel to the ground and both Bryant and Ball rushed to his side. They asked who he was and Mann replied, "Just a tramp."  

Asked for a doctor. Mann then asked, "Who are you." When the two replied they were from Warrensburg, Mann said, "Oh, get a doctor." Those were the only words he uttered. In the meantime, Wade, who was getting gas in his car in Centerview, heard the shots and immediately drove his car down the railroad tracks to the spot where Mann was lying. They placed Mann in the rumble seat with one sitting with him and returned to the jail here. Dr. Patterson examined him upon his arrival and pronounced him dead. It was likely that he died shortly after being placed in the car. Bryant believes his first shot struck Mann in the left leg at the knee as he aimed low. He then raised his sight as Mann continued running. He was using a .12 gauge automatic shotgun and fired at Mann four times. Officers are unable to account for how Mann secured the saw which he used to escape from jail. They have been unable to find the saw and believe it is a good one from the manner in which the iron was sawed. The prisoners' incoming and outgoing mail has been carefully scrutinized since Sheriff Jones took office, January 1 and he has the visitors except attorneys.  
Letter from mother. Both Sheriff Jones and his chief deputy, W.N. Burks have been suspicious of Mann since a letter arrived for him Friday which evidently had been written by his mother. Ever since his arrest on the morning of December 9, following the fatal shooting of Sam Burge, Mann has maintained he has no relatives. It had been assumed by officers that Mann was attempting to shield his parents from the knowledge of his arrest and the trouble he was in and that he had given a name other than his own. When he was arrested he said he was Henry Mason and maintained that was his name throughout his imprisonment here. He was identified by persons from Odessa, however, as having registered in a hotel there as Jack Mann. The letter which he received while not signed. Is thought by officers to have been from his mother. It was postmarked Superior, Wis. Evidently Mann had appeal for money to help finance his defense of the murder charge for the letter state that no aid would be forthcoming and they were glad he had changed his name. Unable to account for the letter mailed to his folks, officers were puzzled and on Saturday Sheriff Jones had Mann photographed and finger-printed.  
Recuperating from Operation. Ordinarily Mann would have been locked in an individual cell each night but since his operation February 2 for appendicitis, he had been kept in the large room on the second floor so that he could get as much sunlight and fresh air as possible. The window through which he escaped was at the head of his bed. His threats to the other prisoners evidently scared them. They were under the impression he was armed but such was not the case when he was shot. In his pockets were three $1 bills, a small round coin.
BURGE'S FRIENDS SURE OF JACK MANN'S GUILT ---- Fatal Shooting of Former Fire Chief on December 8 Brought Threats of lynching After Arrest --- The shooting an killing of Jack Mann Monday night closes a case that stirred Warrensburg such as no other had done in many years.
While never convicted of fatally wounding Samuel J. Burge in an attempted holdup of the Tip-Top filing station at the junction of highways 50 and 13 on the night of December 8, late there was enough circumstantial evidence that many in Warrensburg were convinced that Mann was guilty. Burge was a popular young man, having been employed with an oil company for eight years before taking over the duties of fire chief, which post he served for near two years. He was working his first night at the station after resigning from the fire department and was preparing to close the station about 11 o'clock when a car stopped in the driveway and its driver asked that the gasoline tank be filled. Wrestled for Gun. The driver proffered a $10 bill in payment of the gas but Burge stated he was unable to make the change and asked if the motorist had anything smaller. He said he didn't and Burge went into the station where he had the money sack hidden to make change. As Burge was reaching for the money sack, the driver of the car entered the office and said, "I'll take that money." Burge replied. "I guess you won't," as he turned around. The motorist reached for his pocket and Burge thinking he could stop him from getting the gun, jumped for him. They wrestled in the station for possession of the gun and in there it was discharged once, the bullet lodging in the 5-gallon can of oil. Two other shots were fired both striking Burge in the stomach. Despite his critical condition Burge continued his fight and the two worked out into the driveway of the station where the filling station attendant secured the gun and fired at the fleeting bandit.  

Lost Hat in Scuffle. During the fight the bandit's hat was left on the fender of the car. This was one of the many links of circumstantial evidence connecting Mann with the shooting. Mann after his arrest wore a tie and shoes bearing the mark of a Chillcothe merchant. The hat also bore the name of a Chillicothe merchant. Posses' were quickly formed as news of the shooting spread over the city and Despite the intense cold, men scoured the surrounding county and patrolled the highways throughout the night without success. Bloodhounds were called from Kansas City but lost the trail north of town. A.E. Wakeman, chief of police at Odessa, was one of the officers informed of the incident by the then Sheriff J.R. Black and he spread the alarm over the countryside in Lafayette County.  
In answer to a call. Mr. Wakeman was told by Mrs Henry Hook, who lives 17 miles northwest of Warrensburg, that a young man with an injured hand had stopped at her farm home early the morning of December 9 for breakfast. He was then given a ride to highway No. 40 after he had said he wanted to get to Kansas City. Chief Wakeman recognized Mann sitting in a filling station on highway No. 40 seven miles east of Odessa and brought him to Warrensburg. A search of his clothes at the courthouse revealed thirty-five .32 caliber cartridges, similar to those used in the gun with which Burge was shot. He also had an injured right hand which was believed hurt in the scuffle with Burge over possession of the gun. Mann was taken to Burge's room at the hospital just before the latter died and was positively identified by Burge as the man who shot him. When first brought to Warrensburg he said his name was Henry Mason but he was later identified as Jack Mann by Mrs. Elmer Abbott of Odessa. When feelings became tense in the city and threats of lynching were heard, Mann was taken to the Jackson County Jail in Kansas City for safe keeping. He was later returned to Warrensburg just before Sheriff Perry A. Jones took office January 1. While in Kansas City he was identified as the man who held up the bank at Napoleon, Mo. Mann when arraigned waived his preliminary hearing and was bound over t o circuit court. Judge Leslie A. Bruce appointed Wallace Cooper, Herbert McClure and Walter Chaney as attorneys for Mann when he stated he was unable to hire counsel and a change of venue was granted. The case was sent to Warsaw for trial and Mann was held in jail here pending his transfer to the Benton County Jail. He suffered an attack of appendicitis the later part of January and an operation was performed at the Clinic on February 2. Mann was to remain in the hospital only a few days and then taken to the jail to recuperate.

REWARD PAID TO MANN'S CAPTORS: --- Judge Leslie A. Bruce Rules $200 Belongs to Bryant, Ball and Wade --- The $200 reward offered by the Phillips Petroleum Company for the caption and conviction of the slayer of Sam Burge, attendant at Tip-Top service station, was ordered paid to Everett Wage, William Bryant and Albert Ball by Circuit Judge Leslie A. Bruce Friday Morning. The Phillips Petroleum Company had filed a petition in circuit court to include which of eighteen persons named were entitled to the reward. Burge was shot, December 8, 1932 while resisting a bandit who attempted to hold up the service station. He died December 10 in the Oak Hill Sanitarium, after having identified Jack Mann, captured the morning after the shooting, as the person who shot him. Mann later sawed his way out of the Johnson County Jail and was killed by posse members at Centerview. In the Petition, the Company stated that it was not legally bound to pay the reward, but was willing to pay the $200 to the person or persons who apprehended Mann after his escape from Jail. Those who were listed as having possible claims were: J.R. Black, R.L. Mosby, Ernest Austin, Frank Bieman, Karl F. Hammer, Bee C. Fizer, O.T. Helmann, H.M. Strobel, M.H. Hook, Mrs H.F. Hook, William Bryant, A.E. Wakeman, Albert Ball, Perry A. Jones, W.N. Burkes, Everett Wade, Harry J. Salsbury and Paul Robertson. Bryant, Ball and Wade members of the party that met Mann at Centerview, received the reward, less the costs of the action, which amounted to $12.50.

Samuel Julian Burge, Warrensburg, MO
 Samuel Julian Burge
Born 8 Sept 1899 
Died 8 Dec 1932. 
Married 14 August 1918 to Gladys Coats. 
Married 14 Oct 1929 to Annabelle Smith). 
The 10th and youngest child of Samuel Alexander Burge and Mary (Molly) Elizabeth Phillips was born at their farm home near Columbus, Missouri on September 8, 1899. He married the first time Warrensburg, Missouri on August 14, 1918 to Gladys Coats and later divorced. No children 
He married the second time on October 14, 1929 to Annabelle Smith of Montserrat, Missouri. 
Died at 9:30 Saturday morning as a result of being shot twice in an attempted robbery of a filling station. He died December 8, 1932 and burial was in Sunset Hill Cemetery. 
He had been Chief of the Warrensburg Fire Department for 19 months but a member of the department for four years. He enjoyed fishing and hunting. He was killed in an attempted robbery of a filling station on his first day of work there. The murder escaped from jail and was killed by the posse.
Link to the story on Ancestry 



Harry Field Parker, MD
Warrensburg, MO
American Legion Commander Photograph
Harry Field Parker, MD
Biographical Sketch of Harry F. Parker, M.D., Johnson County, Missouri, Warrensburg Township From "History of Johnson County, Missouri," by Ewing Cockrell,Historical Publishing Company, Topeka, Cleveland, 1918.
********************************************
Harry F. Parker, M. D., the founder of the "Oak Hill Sanitarium" 
in Warrensburg, has not only preeminently succeeded in the practice 
of medicine in Johnson county but he has made a name for himself 
that is widely known and he is now only thirty-three years of age. 
Doctor Parker was born January 8, 1884 in Johnson county, the 
son of Col. J. H. and Elizabeth Ann (Field) Parker, the former 
a native of Virginia and the latter of Missouri. Col. J. H. Parker 
was the son of William W. and Elizabeth A. (Higgins) Parker. 
The father of William W. Parker, Solomon Parker, was of Scotch 
descent and a lineal descendant of one of the three brothers who 
emigrated from Scotland and settled in Jamestown, Virginia, 
during the earliest Colonial days. William W. Parker came from 
Virginia to Missouri with his maternal grandfather, Mr. Higgins, 
and his son, J. H., and settled in Lafayette county in 1842, on 
tracts of land they had purchased and entered from the government. 
Their route to Missouri led over the Allegheny mountains and 
along the national road from Cumberland to Wheeling, West 
Virginia. Mr. Higgins died in Lexington, Missouri, in 1843 and 
in the same year his daughter, Elizabeth A. (Higgins) Parker, 
the mother of Col. J. H. Parker, also died. William W. Parker 
and his son, J. H., were engaged in the pursuits of agriculture 
in Lafayette county, as were also the family of Fields, prominent 
pioneers of Missouri. J. H. Parker and Elizabeth Ann Field were 
united in marriage in 1860 and to them were born the following 
children: William, a well known farmer and stockman; John, 
deceased; Frank, deceased; Joseph, deceased; Sallie, deceased; 
James H., who is engaged in the real estate and stock business 
in Julesburg, Colorado; Bettie, deceased; and H. F., the subject 
of this review. Col. J. H. Parker has been prominently connected 
with the early history of Johnson County. Politically, he is affiliated 
with the Democratic party and he represented Johnson county in 
the state Legislature. Col. Parker has also filled a number of 
appointive offices. He is a member of the A. F. & A. M. and the 
Cumberland Presbyterian Church. While residing in Johnson 
county, Col. Parker erected a church near his home and contributed 
generously toward its support. A sketch of Col. and Mrs. Parker 
appears in the Biographical History of Missouri in the edition of 1915. 
Harry Field Parker was one of the youngest students who have 
attended the Warrensburg High School, graduating at the age of 
sixteen years. He entered the University of Missouri and was in 
attendance at that institution for two years when he matriculated 
in the Medical School of Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, 
graduating with the degree of Doctor of Medicine in the class of 1906. 
For one year Dr. Parker was interned in the City Hospital of St. Louis, 
which was then under the direction of the board of health. Dr. Parker 
had charge of the Hearne Hospital in San Diego, California, for one 
year. In 1908 he returned to Warrensburg, Missouri, opened his 
office, and began at once an extensive practice. Three years after 
locating in Warrensburg, Doctor Parker founded the "Oak Hill 
Sanitarium," located at 519 South Holden street, which he still 
owns and maintains at a high standard. The hospital has the 
best and most modern equipment and is always fill- ed to its 
capacity. The patients who have been taken there are among 
Doctor Parker's warmest friends and admirers upon leaving 
the sanitarium. It has proven of great value and has filled a 
long felt need of the citizens of Warrensburg and adjoining 
counties. Doctor Parker devotes his time exclusively to his large 
practice. His practice is of a general nature and he has proven 
equally efficient as physician and surgeon. "Oak Hill Sanitarium" 
is open to all the physicians of Johnson County, who send 
many of their patients there. It is under the official management 
of Mrs. Maude M. Irwin, a trained nurse who has been connected 
with the institution since its founding. November 25, 1908, 
Dr. Harry Field Parker was united in marriage with Martha 
Sousley of Nebraska City, Nebraska. She is the daughter of 
Capt. J. R. and Martha (Cheatham) Sousley, both of whom 
are now deceased. At the time of her marriage, Mrs. Parker 
resided in Lowville, New York. Doctor and Mrs. Parker reside 
in their home at 118 West Gay street in Warrensburg. Besides 
his city residence, Doctor Parker is owner of the "Meadow Lawn 
Stock Farm," comprising 400 acres of the best farm land in 
Hazel Hill township, and it is devoted to the breeding of 
Shorthorn cattle.
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Burge Family of Warrensburg and Johnson County, Missouri 
The move from Kentucky to Missouri: There was great excitement when the people of Kentucky heard good reports of land in Missouri, also of the 1862 Homestead Act, promising free lands to settlers in the West. The news came at a time when restless pioneers were already looking of new land. In 1857, a caravan of covered wagons were formed in Hardin County, Kentucky and creaked over the Kentucky trails toward the Mississippi River. The cracking of whips could be hard urging the animals on, but travel was slow, covering only a few miles a day. Several men, carrying rifles for protection against Indians and to keep them supplied with game, headed the procession. The men who led the way Westward were drawn from ever background. They had only one thing in common, a bold faith in their own ability to conquer the wilderness and find what they were seeking. Among the eager adventures were William (Billy) Alexander Burge and his wife Teresa Funk Burge and two small sons, Samuel Alexander Burge (the g-grandfather of Warren Lee Burge) and James Burge, several members of the Funk family, and a brother of William (Billy) Alexander Burge, probably Louis (probably George Lewis Burge WLB) by name. While crossing one of the two rivers, the Mississippi or the Ohio, a quarrelsome member of the boat's res started teasing and tormenting little James. The incident made his father very angry. William (Billy) Alexander Burge took his knife with intentions of killing the man, but was stopped by his brother. The wagon train made its final crossing to Cape Girardeau, Missouri. They continued their journey by walking, riding horseback and taking turns riding in the wagons. Mary Funk - Married to W.T. Shivel, sister of Teresa Funk Burge wife of William (Billy) Alexander Funk Burge road a horse side-saddle the whole trip. NOTE: I have the complete history of Shivel from a 1896 narrative written and typed by W.T. Shivel. The Burge and Funk families decided to settle in Pettis County, Missouri, near Green Ridge, Missouri. From the marriage of William (Billy) Alexander Burge and Mary Funk Burge, were nine children: Samuel Burge, James Burge, Jacob Burge, Elbert Burge, Newton Burge, Harney Burge, Robert Burge and a daughter that died at birth and one child who probably died in Kentucky. Samuel Burge was born 7 April 1851 in Hardin County, Kentucky. Samuel Alexander Burge: First child of William Alexander Burge and Teresa Funk: Born April 7, 1851 in Hardin County, Kentucky. The oldest son of William Alexander Burge and Teresa Burge, born April 7, 1815. A native of Hardin Count, Kentucky, he moved with his family by covered wagon to Green Ridge, Pettis County. Missouri, where he grew to manhood. He married Mary (Mollie) Elizabeth Phillips, born November 29, 1858. Married: Mary Elizabeth (Mollie) Phillips - Oct. 11, 1877 when Samuel and Mollie rode horses to Fayetteville, Missouri to be married. They set up housekeeping in Columbus Community in Johnson County, Missouri, where they farmed. Samuel Burge heard of good land that could be obtained in St. Clair Missouri. In 1882 he moved his wife, Mollie and two small sons, Newt and Ray to a farm near Vista. While living there, two children were born, Mary Catherine and Aaron Theodore. In 1888 the family moved back to their community in Johnson County, Missouri. They were the parents of 10 children
(1) Elbert Newton "Newt" Burge, born Febuary 27, 1897 - died Sept. 1966; (2) William Ray Burge born 1881- died 1958; (3) Mary Catherine Burge Iseminger: (4) Aaron Theodore Burge born December 5, 1887 - died February 28, 1965; (5) Emery Blake "EM" or "E.B." Burge Sept. 10, 1889- d August 27, 1968; (6) Ora Pearl Burge: (7) Stella Isa Belle Burge Claunch, born November 28, 1892 - died October 30, 1968; (8) Roy Thomas Burge, born 1895 - died 1936; (9) Florence Ethyl Burge; (10) Samuel Julian Burge, born 1899 - murdered December 8, 1932. Samuel Julian was killed in an attempted Robbery in Warrensburg, in 1932.

Elbert Newton Burge ran a gas station called Burge's Place in Warrensburg, for 20 years. I have available the high school year books for 1919 and 1921 for Farmer's High School in Johnson County. 
Looking for any additional information. Warren Burge WrnBrg@aol.com