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Friday, July 6, 2012

May 7, 1865 "Little" Archie J Clement,Massacre at Kingsville, Johnson County, Missouri

On May 7, 1865 in Kingsville, Missouri - 110 Confederate guerrillas rode into the town of Kingsville. They proceeded to sack the town and burn down 5 houses. 8 were killed and 2 were wounded.




Frank James (right) and Little Archie Clement
This photo of Frank and Little Archie Clement was probably taken around the end of the Civil War in 1865 or so. Archie was a fellow Confederate guerrilla and a trusted friend of both James brothers(Frank James and Jesse James). Archie was also an early member of the James-Younger Gang.




Jesse James and Little Archie Clement
The man on the left is Jesse, and the man on the right is his closest friend during the Civil War, Little Archie Clement. This photo was taken in either 1864 or 1865. This is the only photo where Jesse's left hand is showing, so it was taken before he lost the tip of his middle left finger
On January 1,1846 Archie Clement was born in Kingsville, Johnson County, Missouri. Archie rode with Jesse James while being with Quantrill. Archie fought with Jesse at the Centralia Massacre. Jesse and Archie were so close to one another that Jesse had his younger half-brother named after him. It is said that Archie is the one that brought the James boys into bank robbery; he was one of the masterminds behind the Clay County Savings Association robbery on February 13,1866.

Dec. 13, 1866---Little Arch Clement is lynched for crimes committed during the Civil War.
Johnson County, Missouri
A Civil War skirmish between 15 Federal Cavalrymen and about 40 Southern Guerrillas
From The Records of The Provost Marshal

On 11 June, 1864, a detachment of Company M, First Missouri State Militia,  left Holden, Missouri for a Scout in the Kingsville area. The detachment consisted of Corporal Joseph Parman and 14 enlisted men. They left at 9 A.M. and were to return the next day. They found nothing the first day and spent the night near the farm of Nancy Longacre. The Longacre family was a large one and nearly all of the men were either in the Confederate Army or with Quantrill's Guerrillas. Two of the Longacre men, a father and son, had been murdered by Kansas Troops.
They had just started out the next morning when they were overtaken by a large body of Guerrillas, led by Col. Richard Yeager and Capt. Bill Anderson. Twelve of the Federal Soldiers were killed. It appeared that at least four had surrendered, then were executed. One was scalped.
The Federals arrested Nancy Longacre and her 14 year old daughter, Martha (Mattie) and accused them of giving the Guerrillas information on the location of the Federal Troops. They were imprisoned in St. Louis and specifically asked if they had given the Guerrillas information about Parman and his squad. Of course, they denied any contact with Guerrillas. and were eventually released.
For more Longacre information, see Lady Bushwackers of Johnson County and Charles A. Longacre.

The Report of Corporal Parman
HDQRS. Co. M, Detach. First Cav., Mo State Militia
Holden, Mo., June 14, 1864
Captain: I have the honor to report to you, in pursuance of your request, movements of the men belonging to Company M, which I had on the scout under my command on the 11th and 12th instant: I moved with my command from camp on Saturday, the 11th instant, at 9 a.m., and proceeded west on the north side of the railroad, travelling some 15 miles; thence turned in a southeast direction, and marched to a point near the railroad some three miles west of Kingsville. Most of the distance marched on this day was in the brush, and saw but little sign of bushwhackers, finding only one trail, which I followed for some distance until we lost it by the parties separating. We camped for a part of the night near a Mrs. Longacre's, about one-half mile north of the railroad. On the morning of the 12th instant I moved with my men in a northeast direction from which I had camped, and had proceeded but a short distance when I discovered a large body of cavalry in my rear some 50 or 75 yards, and on the discovery of the enemy I formed my men in line and challenged the advancing party, who only increased their speed, and at this instant I ordered my men to fire on the enemy, which was done in a very few seconds. By this time my little detachment was entirely surrounded - only a small space toward the brush. By this time the bullets from the enemy's lines were falling like hail among us, and several of my men were killed. I remained in front of my line until the enemy had passed me, even some of them between me and my own lines, at which time I moved with all possible speed to the left, engaged one of the enemy, firing at him twice, when he turned, and, as I was in a helpless condition, my men nearly all killed, I made for camp with all speed possible. I feel satisfied that the enemy had been informed of my position and strength, as he had flanked me on the right and left before he showed himself in my rear. The attacking party was not less than 40 strong, and from the best information I have I think the whole command of the enemy did not fall short of 80 men, and probably 100. The enemy were all dressed in full Federal uniform and had the regular badges worn by our men on their hats and caps; small part of them wearing Federal overcoats.
I learned that the party was commanded by Colonel Yeager, of the rebel army, assisted by Bill Anderson, who is a captain of a guerilla band. Yeager informed the citizens that he asked no quarter and would give none. I lost in this unfortunate affair 12 of my command, only 2 escaping. The men, after being killed, were stripped of all their outer clothing and everything valuable was taken from their persons, and the enemy scalped 1 man after they had killed and stripped him. The enemy marched from the north during the night, returning toward the Sni Hills after the engagement.
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
Joseph V. Parman
Corporal, Company M, First Cavalry, Missouri State Militia

Military Reports of the Kingsville Massacre

The following reports were gleaned from Dyer's 'The Compendium of the Rebellion." Additional information can be found in these volumes as well as the "Adjutant General of Missouri Report of 1865." They were searched at: 

Headquarters Missouri National Guard
Office of the Adjutant General
1717 Industrial Drive
Jefferson City MO 65101


Warrensburg, Mo., June 12, 1864 - 3:30 p.m.
Captain Rouell,
Pleasant Hill, Mo.:
Troops near Holden had a fight this morning and had 12 men killed. Particulars not known.
E.B. Brown
Brigadier-General of Volunteers


Warrensburg, Mo., June 12, 1864
Colonel Ford,
Kansas City:
Company M, First Missouri State Militia, had a fight this morning near Holden and had 12 men killed. Particulars not known.
E.B. Brown
Brigadier-General, Commanding


Report of Captain Wyckoff, First Missouri State Militia Cavalry

HDQRS. Detach. First Cav., Missouri State Militia
Holden, June 14, 1864

On the morning of June 11, 1864, in obedience to orders, I ordered Captain Eads, Company M, to detail from his command 1 non-commissioned officer and 14 privates of his company for a scout north of Kingsville, who marched at 9 a.m. of the same day under the following order:

Corporal Parman and 14 men of Company M will proceed to scout the country north of Kingsville and along Crawford Fork, and return to camp at 12 m. of the 12th of June, 1864. Provide your men with one day's rations.

John Wyckoff,
Captain, Commanding Detachment.


The following is the report of Corporal Parman:

HDQRS. Co. M, Detach. First Cav., Mo State Militia
Holden, Mo., June 14, 1864

Captain: I have the honor to report to you, in pursuance of your request, movements of the men belonging to Company M, which I had on the scout under my command on the 11th and 12th instant: I moved with my command from camp on Saturday, the 11th instant, at 9 a.m., and proceeded west on the north side of the railroad, travelling some 15 miles; thence turned in a southeast direction, and marched to a point near the railroad some three miles west of Kingsville. Most of the distance marched on this day was in the brush, and saw but little sign of bushwhackers, finding only one trail, which I followed for some distance until we lost it by the parties separating. We camped for a part of the night near a Mrs. Longacre's, about one-half mile north of the railroad. On the morning of the 12th instant I moved with my men in a northeast direction from which I had camped, and had proceeded but a short distance when I discovered a large body of cavalry in my rear some 50 or 75 yards, and on the discovery of the enemy I formed my men in line and challenged the advancing party, who only increased their speed, and at this instant I ordered my men to fire on the enemy, which was done in a very few seconds. By this time my little detachment was entirely surrounded - only a small space toward the brush. By this time the bullets from the enemy's lines were falling like hail among us, and several of my men were killed. I remained in front of my line until the enemy had passed me, even some of them between me and my own lines, at which time I moved with all possible speed to the left, engaged one of the enemy, firing at him twice, when he turned, and, as I was in a helpless condition, my men nearly all killed, I made for camp with all speed possible. I feel satisfied that the enemy had been informed of my position and strength, as he had flanked me on the right and left before he showed himself in my rear. The attacking party was not less than 40 strong, and from the best information I have I think the whole command of the enemy did not fall short of 80 men, and probably 100. The enemy were all dressed in full Federal uniform and had the regular badges worn by our men on their hats and caps; small part of them wearing Federal overcoats.

I learned that the party was commanded by Colonel Yeager, of the rebel army, assisted by Bill Anderson, who is a captain of a guerrilla band. Yeager informed the citizens that he asked no quarter and would give none. I lost in this unfortunate affair 12 of my command, only 2 escaping. The men, after being killed, were stripped of all their outer clothing and everything valuable was taken from their persons, and the enemy scalped 1 man after they had killed and stripped him. The enemy marched from the north during the night, returning toward the Sni Hills after the engagement.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
Joseph V. Parman
Corporal, Company M, First Cavalry, Missouri State Militia

Report of Captain Wyckoff
Aside from the report of Corporal Parman, I have followed and crossed the trail of the party at a number of points between where the slaughter occurred and the Sni Hills sufficient to enable me to know that it came from the north and returned to the north as soon as it had done its work of crime. The point of attack is about 8 miles from this camp. On the arrival of Corporal Parman at Kingsville, at which I had 11 of my company under Sergeant Triplett, Captain Duncan mounted his horse and came to this place immediately. We were engaged at inspection of arms when we received the intelligence. I immediately ordered my company to saddle and mount; in twenty minutes had 50 of my company in the saddle and on the march. Captain Eads had marched on receipt of the news with 20 of Company M, who were mounted for a two day's scout at the time of the arrival of Captain Duncan. I came up with Captain Eads at Kingsville, where I found Sergeant Triplett and his squad mounted and in line. He informed me that the enemy came in sight of Kingsville in such force, and the information received from Corporal Parman was such as to make him think best to keep possession of the buildings at that place until he could get assistance from this place. He joined me and we moved to the place of the massacre, where I found the men that had been killed strewn along for about one-half mile, 5 dead on the ground where they had formed their line, the others near the brush and in the brush in front of them, where I am informed they were met by another party that was in ambush and cut them off from the brush. My opinion is, from the fact of the men being shot in the eyes, that 4 of the men surrendered and were afterward shot and stripped of everything valuable and Corporal Ireland scalped.

I immediately ordered a sufficient number of carts from section 114 of Pacific Railroad Company to convey the dead to camp, which was the best and only conveyance to be had in a reasonable time. They were promptly furnished, and the dead gathered and sent to Holden, under Lieutenant Cobb, with orders to give them the best burial in his power, which was done. The dead being gathered, and my scouts called in which I had out to ascertain the course the enemy had taken, in which they had been unsuccessful, I started with 58 enlisted men of my company and 18 men of Company M, Captain Eads and Lieutenant Triplett, in a southern course about 2 miles; came on a trail of about 80 or 100 men bearing southwest, which I followed about 2 miles and ascertained it to be the trail in which they had come in. I turned north and bore around to the east about 5 miles, where we struck the trail going in the direction of Chapel Hill, which soon became [fainter] as when going down, and soon began to scatter and bear west. The trail we followed struck into the Sni Hills, about 3 miles west of the Widow Hill's, where Lewis Spainhowers has lived since early spring. Here we had a short skirmish with them, in which 1 of them was severely if not mortally wounded, instantly falling from his horse. They fired rapidly from the brush. I instantly dismounted 40 men, and deployed them as skirmishers and searched the brush, but they were gone; they had moved in a direction a little north of Lone Jack. It was now night, but as the men were good we marched on, having been joined by about 40 of the Colorado troops, with whom my pickets had a skirmish; but hearing of their fire, and having knowledge of their being in the country, and getting in a position where I could see their commander, gave the signal and soon had things all right; no damage done to either party. We remained together until the moon set. Being within 3 miles of Pleasant Hill we marched there and remained until morning, my men having had nothing to eat since the morning before, but were treated very kindly by the soldiers and officers at that place and furnished with breakfast and forage. June 13, breakfast over, I marched from Pleasant Hill north of east, crossing a number of small streams, the most of the way through brush and woods, very thick, 5 miles south of Lone Jack. Started some guerrillas from an old house in the brush; did not get closer than 400 yards; did not see but 2, though there were more in the party; they ran east. We continued in an easterly direction until we arrived north of a point where the men had been killed on the previous day, turned south, examined the ground and brush with care, and am prepared to give my opinion of the affair at any proper time. Having no rations with us, and none at camp, we returned at 4 p.m. of the 13th of June. At near 11 o'clock received a dispatch from you to send out a scout; at 12 o'clock 25 of Company D and 25 of Company M left this camp under Lieutenants Cobb and Triplett; they are still out.

All of which is respectfully submitted to you.
John Wyckoff,
Captain, Commanding Detachment.

NOTES:
On June 30, Brigadier-General of Volunteers, E.B. Brown submitted a report that said, in part:
'I regret to say that in one instance the loss was in a great measure due to the negligence of the corporal who was in command, through which the lives of the men entrusted in his charge have been wantonly sacrificed.'
No specifics were given. Perhaps to have his 14 men turn and present a challenge in the face of such a large force and firepower was folly. Perhaps to have tried to flee to a better defensive position would have been better. A review of Corporal Parman's military records might shed light on charges made, if any.
As a rule, man-for-man, Federal troops were severely out-gunned. Normally, the troops carried a single-shot rifle and/or revolver, whereas the guerrilla often carried from two to six revolvers plus other assorted weapons. The Militia was caught in the open, and in an ambush such as this, would have used valuable time forming the skirmish line, all while the enemy was closing in great numbers and firing into them as rapidly as possible. The line probably broke almost immediately, the survivors scattering, trying to make a dash for the brush. Although often done, it is uncertain if Corporal Parman had his troops dismount to form the skirmish line.
(Shooting in the eye was a common practice the guerrillas used on captured Federal troops. Both sides had a tendency to immediately execute captured prisoners.)
Corporal Joseph V. Parman was born in KY about 1833. When he moved to Gentry County is unknown, but he was certainly there by about 1857 as his father died there. Joseph V. Parman married Nancy Fitzhugh March 10, 1867, probably in Gentry County. Nancy was born February 08, 1844 in Buchanan Co, MO and probably outlived Joseph, as she died on August 22, 1905 in Ellenorah, MO with notice being made that she was survived by 8 boys and 2 girls. She was buried in the Lone Star Cemetery, in north-east Gentry County.






  • Roster of Company M









  • Recruits known to be from Worth County









  • Dead and Buried victims and burials











  • Letter written by Z.P. Cadle









  • Pension Jane Cadle Pension Requests









  • Yearly Report-1863 of the 1st Regiment









  • Yearly Report-1864 of the 1st Regiment









  • Kingsville Massacre ...Main






  • Archie J. Clement


    Clement, Archie J Anderson At age 17, he was Bill Andersons lieutenant and executioner and scalper. From Kingsville, Johnson County, MO. Small, blonde and grey-eyed, with a perpetual smile. When told to kill he used knife and pistol. He scalped and mutilated his victims when it pleased him. Took over Andersons command when he was killed 13 December 1866. Bacon Montgomery killed him in Lexington, MO.


    Archie J. Clement, Left, from Kingsville, Missouri
    (Three of Anderson's men in Sherman, Texas
    From left to right: Archie Clement, Dave Pool, and Dave Hendricks)
    Belle Starr’s wedding photgraph
    Many of the guests at Starr’s wedding were OUTLAWS! Present were Jesse James, Frank James, Perry Samuel, Archie Clement, Jim Younger, and John “King” Fisher.




    Anderson’s Head Devil” 
    Little Archie Clement

    Born in Moniteau County, Missouri in January 1846 in 1853 the Clement family moved to Cass County in the Western portion of the state and eventually to Johnson County, Missouri near the town of Kingsville in 1860-61. At 15 Archie enlisted in the 2nd Missouri Cavalry, Missouri State Guard in September of 1861 and served until December of 1861 and returning to Johnson County and shortly there after joining the Partisan Rangers, most probably first with Quantrill’s Company, but he seems to quickly have aligned himself with Bill Anderson, then a Lieutenant under Quantrill.
    Archibald Clement was small in stature; some say standing only five feet tall and weighing less than 130 lbs, this caused him to be given the appellation of “Little Archie” he also seemed to be a happy fellow or at least smiled a great deal and was also referred to as “Smiling Archie”. But Archie’s size belied ferociousness, he was apparently consummate killer with little compunction for how he completed the act, he also displayed a penchant for scalping his victim this lead to Archie being referred to as “Scalping Archie”.
    By age 17 Archie Clement was a Lieutenant in Bill Anderson’s more or less Independent Company of Partisan Rangers, and was often operating in command of an element on his own. Archie took part in most of the major actions that Andersons Company was involved in, including the raid on the German settlement of Concordia in Lafayette County, Missouri in 1863 where Clement allegedly decapitated a German after forcing him to guide the Partisan’s through militia lines and then placed the Germans head on a fence post as a warning to the other “Dutch”. Bodies of union troops and Missouri State Militia were often found baring notes reading “You come to hunt bush whackers. Now you are skelpt. Clemyent skelpt you. Wm. Anderson” it probably wasn’t Archie nor Anderson who wrote this particular note as it is doubtful that Archie would misspell his name and Andersons known writing reflects a higher degree of education. Archie continued to raise in command responsibility and his killings increased until he was roundly known as “Anderson’s Head Devil” or Anderson’s Head Demon”
    In 1864 during Prices Raid of 64 Archie commanded an element of Anderson’s command that raided Danville. New Florence, High Hill and other points east to near St. Charles Missouri, shortly after this raid Archie took command of Anderson’s Company after Anderson’s death and commanded it throughout the remainder of the war.
    The remainder of the of the war for Archie Clement would extend to 1866, Clement did not surrender and was connected to several bank robberies in Western Missouri, despite negotiations conducted on the part of the US by former partisan Dave Poole , Archie along with a contingent of Partisans remained “in the brush” refusing to surrender.
    During the election of 1866 Clement with a gang of 100 former partisans attacked the town of Lexington on election day and managed to intimidate the town enough that the Republican party was defeated in the general election. In response to this Gov. T. Fletcher dispatched Major Bacon Montgomery and a Company of Missouri State Militia to engage Clement and his men. True to tactics and form Archie faded into the hills and creek bottoms and avoided a major engagement with Montgomery’s force, Montgomery seemed content to garrison Lexington.
    In 1866 the Missouri State Legislature in response to political and sectional violence surrounding the election passed legislation requiring male adults to enroll in the militia, hearing this and seeing a chance to stick his thumb in the eye of the authorities most likely , Archie through Dave Poole sent word to Montgomery that in order to comply with the new law he wanted safe passage in and out of Lexington in order for he and his men to enroll in the militia, Montgomery stating he wished to avoid a major engagement in Lexington gave his permission. On December 13th , 1863 Archie Clement lead his former partisans into Lexington, legally enrolled in the militia and then led them out of Lexington without incident.
    However Archie returned to have drinks with a friend at the City Hotel once his men were safely out of town. Archie at the time was wanted for a bank robbery in Liberty Missouri and Montgomery attempted to have him taken into custody on that warrant. When the arrest was attempted Archie drew his revolvers and a gunfight ensued, despite being wounded in the chest Clement made it to his horse and raced down the street firing, until he was shot from his horse in front of the court house.
    When the militia reached Archie he had been wounded numerous times and was attempting to **** a revolver with his teeth. One of the Militiamen asked
    "Arch, you are dying. What do you want me to do with you?"
    To which Clement replied
    "I've done what I always said I would do ... die before I'd surrender."
    Bacon Montgomery would later say of the Clement incident, "I've never met better 'grit' on the face of the earth."


         
    http://theellisoncollection.com/gallery.php?gid=62
    http://canteymyerscollection.com/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=285


    At age 17, he was Bill Anderson's lieutenant. Hailed from Kingsville, Johnson County, Missouri. Sometimes referred to as "Little Archie Clement."
    Archie was a small man, blonde and grey-eyed, with a perpetual smile. Clement took over Anderson's command when Anderson was killed on October 26, 1864. Bacon Montgomery killed Archie Clement in Lexington, MO on December 13, 1866.
         Archibald (Archie) Clement or "Little Arch"  was a Confederate guerrilla leader in the American Civil War, known for his brutality towards Union soldiers and pro-Union civilians in Missouri.
        Archie Clement was born in Moniteau County, Missouri, on January 01, 1846. The family moved to Johnson County in 1853, then to Cass County, then to Kingsville, Johnson county about 1861.
        At age 15, Archie enlisted in the Confederate Army and served two months and nineteen days, then was discharged.
         He joined the guerillas under William T. Anderson, and became known as Bloody Bill's most trusted compatriot. At age 17, he was Bill Anderson's lieutenant. Archie was a small man, blonde and grey-eyed, with a perpetual smile. Standing just over five feet tall and weighing about 130 pounds, Clement's slight stature belied his ferocity, as he was known to be an expert pistol shot and fearless under fire. He was often referred to as "Little Archie Clement."  
        William "Bloody Bill" Anderson, Confederate guerilla and outlaw, was born in Missouri and in 1861 was a resident of Council Groves, Kansas, where he and his father and brothers achieved a reputation as horse thieves and murderers. At the outbreak of the Civil War he was forced by his Unionist neighbors to flee to Clay County, Missouri, where he became a guerilla leader notorious for leading raids along the Kansas-Missouri border and infamous for scalping his victims. He often decorated the bridle of his horse with Yankee scalps. Especially heinous was his raid against the German settlers of Lafayette County, Missouri, in July 1863.
        Anderson's unit was a part of Quantrill's Guerrillas. Prominent in his band were Archie Clement, Frank James, and later Jesse James.
        On August 21, 1863, Anderson and his gang of about thirty joined William C. Quantrill in the celebrated Lawrence, Kansas, raid, in which Anderson was reputed to have been the most bloodthirsty of all of the 450 raiders.
        Archie Clement took a prominent role in all major operations of Anderson's unit in 1864, including the Centralia Massacre, looting and burning buildings and terrifying the local populace. They barricaded the tracks of the Northern Missouri Railroad, and forced a train to stop. They robbed the civilian passengers, and killed 21 Union soldiers who were returning home to Iowa and northwest Missouri on furlough. Anderson left one Union sergeant alive for a possible prisoner exchange; the rest he had stripped, shot, and scalped or otherwise mutilated.
        Upon Anderson's death on October 27, 1864, Archie Clement took command of his unit, continuing military action into the next year, even after the Civil War ended with the surrender at Lee's army in Virginia. Clement took over Anderson's command when Anderson was killed on October 26, 1864. While many of his comrades eventually surrendered, Archie never did.
        By the beginning of 1866, Clement steered himself and his friends into a new profession; bank robbery. On February 13, 1866, a group of gunmen carried out the first daylight, peacetime, armed bank robbery in U.S. history, when they held up the Clay County Savings Association in Liberty, Missouri, stealing some $60,000 in cash and bonds. The state authorities suspected Archie Clement of leading the raid. The bank happened to be run by the leading Radicals of Clay County, who had just held a public meeting for their party. The Radical governor posted a reward for Clement, while he and his men conducted further robberies that year. On election day of 1866, Clement led his crew into Lexington, Missouri, where they intimidated Radical voters and secured the election of a Conservative slate of candidates. 
         In later years, the list of suspects for the Clay County robbery would grow to include Frank James, Cole Younger, John Jarrette, Oliver Shepard, Bud and Donny Pence, Frank Gregg, Bill and James Wilkerson, Joab Perry, Ben Cooper, Red Monkus and Allen Parmer (who later married Susan James, Frank and Jesse's sister). The outlaws also killed George Wymore, a bystander on the street outside the bank.
        That crime began a string of robberies, many of which were linked to Clement's group of bushwhackers. The hold-up most clearly linked to the group was of Alexander Mitchell and Company in Lexington, Missouri, on October 30, 1866, which netted $2,011.50. 
        On December 13, 1866, Clement led a group of his men into Lexington to visit old friends, including Dave Pool. Major Bacon Montgomery, Army commander of the town, was anxious to head off a confrontation, and ordered Clement and his pals to register for the local militia at the court house and be on their way, which they did. Later, Archie returned to town alone, to drink with an old friend at the bar of the City Hotel. Upon getting word that Clement was in town and alone, Montgomery acted. His men confronted Archie at the bar, demanding his surrender. A gun battle erupted. Clement dashed outside, got on his horse and tried to flee, only to be riddled with bullets by a company of soldiers as he passed the court house. Archie's pursuers walked up to him as he lay in the street, where he was still trying to cock a revolver with his teeth. One of them asked, "Arch, you are dying. What do you want me to do with you?" to which he replied, "I've done what I always said I would do...die before I'd surrender." He was 19 years old.
        After Archie Clement's death, his guerrilla band continued to rob and be pursued by government troops, until his old friend Jesse James took command and they became the beginning of the James-Younger gang.

         The Clement Family


    Generation No. 1



    1.  EDWARD M.2 CLEMENT  (JOHNSON1) was born Abt. 1800 in Stokes County, North Carolina, and died Bet. 1855 - 1860 in probably in Cass County, Missouri.  He married MARY JANE HIATT Abt. 1828 in North Carolina, daughter of MOSES HIATT and PATSEY DONELLY.  She was born April 13, 1812 in Stokes County, North Carolina, and died Bet. 1870 - 1880 in probably in Cass or Johnson County, Missouri.



    Notes for EDWARD M. CLEMENT:

    The family moved to Moniteau County, Missouri about 1844, then to Johnson County in 1853, to Cass, then back to Johnson after 1860.

         

    Children of EDWARD CLEMENT and MARY HIATT are:

    2.           i.     EDWARD J.3 CLEMENT, b. February 23, 1829, Stokes County, North Carolina.

    3.          ii.     MARTHA E. CLEMENT, b. March 23, 1830, Stokes County, North Carolina; d. March 29, 1919, Lone Jack, Jackson County, Missouri.

                iii.     JANE E. CLEMENT, b. October 25, 1832, Stokes County, North Carolina; d. February 25, 1910, Cass County, Missouri.



    Notes for JANE E. CLEMENT:

    1860 United States Federal Census > Missouri > Johnson > Jackson

    Living with Charles J. and Nancy Clement



    1870 United States Federal Census > Missouri > Cass > Polk

    Living with Andrew and Juriah Miller. 



    4.         iv.     WASHINGTON V. CLEMENT, b. April 10, 1834, Stokes County, North Carolina; d. March 10, 1864, Civil War.

    5.          v.     SARAH ANN CLEMENT, b. January 30, 1836, Stokes County, North Carolina; d. 1940.

    6.         vi.     CHARLES J. CLEMENT, b. November 30, 1838, Stokes County, North Carolina; d. Sonoma County, California.

               vii.     WILLIAM A. CLEMENT, b. March 15, 1841, Stokes County, North Carolina.



    Notes for WILLIAM A. CLEMENT:

    Listed with the family in 1860 as age 20. No further record found. May have died in the war. May have been the brother of Archie called "Henry" who was with Quantrill.



    7.       viii.     JURIAH A. CLEMENT, b. May 25, 1843, Stokes County, North Carolina.

                ix.     ARCHIBALD CLEMENT, b. January 01, 1846, Missouri; d. December 13, 1866, Lexington, Missouri.



    Notes for ARCHIBALD CLEMENT:

    Name: Clement, Archibald

    Rank: Private   Conflict: Civil War   Side: Confederate   Type of Unit: Cavalry

    Organization: Missouri State Guard   Name of Unit: 2nd Missouri Cavalry



    Clement, Archibald,  Pvt.   Co. E, 2nd Mo. Cav.   MSG--CSA

    Enlisted Sept. 26, 1861    Discharged Dec. 10, 1861

    Actual Service 2 months, 19 days    Paid $71.90 April 25, 1862.

    Muster Roll on file, Adj. Office, Jefferson City, Mo.





                 x.     GABRIEL H. CLEMENT, b. March 01, 1849, Missouri; d. Bef. 1860, probably Cass County, Missouri.

    8.         xi.     MARY FRANCES CLEMENT, b. August 19, 1851, Missouri; d. March 28, 1942.

               xii.     HANDY CLEMENT, b. Abt. 1853, Missouri.



    Notes for HANDY CLEMENT:

    Listed as age 7 in 1860. Not with her mother in 1870. No further record found.



              xiii.     HENRY CLEMENT, b. Abt. 1855, Missouri; d. Bef. 1870, probably Johnson county, Missouri.



    Notes for HENRY CLEMENT:

    Some rosters list Henry Clement, brother of Archie, as a member of Quantrill's Guerrillas. Obviously, Henry was much too young. It's possible that the Clement listed as Henry was actually another brother, William Clement.

    Generation No. 2

    2.  EDWARD J.3 CLEMENT (EDWARD M.2, JOHNSON1) was born February 23, 1829 in Stokes County, North Carolina.  He married SUSAN CRUM May 23, 1850 in Moniteau County, Missouri.  She was born Abt. 1830 in Virginia.

    Notes for EDWARD J. CLEMENT:
    1870 United States Federal Census > California > Los Angeles > El Monte
         
    Children of EDWARD CLEMENT and SUSAN CRUM are:
                  i.     WILLIAM4 CLEMENT, b. Abt. 1851, Missouri.
    9.          ii.     JOHNSON CLEMENT, b. Abt. 1854, Missouri.
                iii.     GEORGE CLEMENT, b. Abt. 1856, Missouri; m. MOLLIE E. MORRELL; b. Abt. 1859, Texas.

    Notes for GEORGE CLEMENT:
    1880 United States Federal Census > California > Los Angeles > Westminster > District 29

                iv.     HENRY CLEMENT, b. Abt. 1864, California. 

    3.  MARTHA E.3 CLEMENT (EDWARD M.2, JOHNSON1) was born March 23, 1830 in Stokes County, North Carolina, and died March 29, 1919 in Lone Jack, Jackson County, Missouri.  She married FLAVIOUS JOSEPHUS HOWARD December 27, 1849 in Moniteau county, Missouri, son of JOSEPH HOWARD.  He was born Abt. 1823 in North Carolina, and died Bet. 1864 - 1870 in Missouri (Civil War?).

    Notes for MARTHA E. CLEMENT:
    1870 United States Federal Census > Missouri > Johnson > Kingsville - same page as her mother.
    1880 United States Federal Census > Missouri > Cass > Polk > District 39
    1900 United States Federal Census > Missouri > Cass > Polk > District 39
    1910 United States Federal Census > Missouri > Jackson > Van Buren > District 215

    Notes for FLAVIOUS JOSEPHUS HOWARD:
    1850 United States Federal Census > Missouri > Johnson > Jackson
    1860 United States Federal Census > Missouri > Johnson > Jackson - same page as Charles J. Clement

    8th Regiment, Missouri Infantry - Confederate
     Howard, Clement
     Howard, F.J.
     Howard, George W.
     Howard, J.A.
     Howard, Thomas J.
         
    Children of MARTHA CLEMENT and FLAVIOUS HOWARD are:
                  i.     JOSEPH E.4 HOWARD, b. Abt. 1851.
                 ii.     ELIZABETH HOWARD, b. Abt. 1856, Missouri.
                iii.     RUFUS K. HOWARD, b. Abt. 1857, Johnson County, Missouri; d. Bef. 1870, Johnson County, Missouri.
                iv.     JEREMIAH HOWARD, b. November 1863, Missouri.
                 v.     JESSIE HOWARD, b. February 1869, Missouri. 

    4.  WASHINGTON V.3 CLEMENT (EDWARD M.2, JOHNSON1) was born April 10, 1834 in Stokes County, North Carolina, and died March 10, 1864 in Civil War.  He married MARY FRANCIS CUNNINGHAM October 28, 1852 in Johnson County, Missouri.  She was born Abt. 1835 in Tennessee.

    Notes for WASHINGTON V. CLEMENT:
    1860 United States Federal Census > Kansas Territory > Linn > Valley
    ----------
    Name: Washington Clemons ,  
    Residence: Blooming Grove, Kansas 
    Enlistment Date: 24 July 1861
    Side Served: Union 
    State Served: Kansas 
    Service Record: Enlisted as a Private on 24 July 1861
    Enlisted in Company D, 10th Infantry Regiment Kansas on 11 February 1862.
    Died of disease Company D, 10th Infantry Regiment Kansas on 10 March 1864 in Alton, IL
    Name: Washington V. Clement
    Service Info.: PVT US ARMY CIVIL WAR 
    Death Date: 10 Mar 1864
    Cemetery: Alton National Cemetery 
    Cemetery Address: 600 Pearl Street Alton, IL 62003 
    Buried At: Section B Site 30 

    Notes for MARY FRANCIS CUNNINGHAM:
    Remarried to John Priddy after Washington's death.  Lived in Henry Co., MO in 1870, then in Cass Co. in 1880.
         
    Children of WASHINGTON CLEMENT and MARY CUNNINGHAM are:
                  i.     MARY4 CLEMENT, b. Abt. 1854, Missouri.
                 ii.     SARAH CLEMENT, b. Abt. 1856, Missouri.
                iii.     LOUISA CLEMENT, b. Abt. 1862, Kansas. 

    5.  SARAH ANN3 CLEMENT (EDWARD M.2, JOHNSON1) was born January 30, 1836 in Stokes County, North Carolina, and died 1940.  She married ISAM HELMS July 07, 1852 in Johnson County, Missouri, son of HOUSTON HELMS and ANNIE GILLIAM.  He was born Abt. 1830 in Missouri.
         
    Children of SARAH CLEMENT and ISAM HELMS are:
                  i.     HENRY4 HELMS, b. Abt. 1853.
                 ii.     SARAH HELMS, b. Abt. 1854.
                iii.     HOUSTON HELMS, b. Abt. 1856.
                iv.     MARY HELMS, b. Abt. 1859. 

    6.  CHARLES J.3 CLEMENT (EDWARD M.2, JOHNSON1) was born November 30, 1838 in Stokes County, North Carolina, and died in Sonoma County, California.  He married NANCY M. HARRIS November 15, 1855 in Johnson County, missouri.  She was born July 03, 1838 in North Carolina, and died February 17, 1913 in Sonoma County, California.

    Notes for CHARLES J. CLEMENT:
    1860 United States Federal Census > Missouri > Johnson > Jackson
    1880 Anderson, Mendocino, California
         
    Children of CHARLES CLEMENT and NANCY HARRIS are:
                  i.     ANNE ELIZA4 CLEMENT, b. October 11, 1863, Missouri.
                 ii.     PAMELA BELLE CLEMENT, b. October 1865, Colorado.
                iii.     AMANDA ELLEN CLEMENT, b. November 25, 1868, Colorado.
                iv.     JESSE EDWARD CLEMENT, b. December 13, 1871, California; d. January 29, 1953, Mendocino County, California.
                 v.     LAURIE F. CLEMENT, b. Abt. 1879, California. 

    7.  JURIAH A.3 CLEMENT (EDWARD M.2, JOHNSON1) was born May 25, 1843 in Stokes County, North Carolina.  She married ANDREW J. MILLER April 14, 1858 in Cass County, Missouri.  He was born Abt. 1833 in Tennessee.

    Notes for ANDREW J. MILLER:
    1870 United States Federal Census > Missouri > Cass > Polk
         
    Children of JURIAH CLEMENT and ANDREW MILLER are:
                  i.     MARY4 MILLER, b. Abt. 1859, Missouri; d. Bef. 1870, Missouri.
                 ii.     WILLIAM MILLER, b. Abt. 1865, Missouri.
                iii.     ROSIE MILLER, b. Abt. 1867, Missouri.
                iv.     JOSEPH MILLER, b. 1869, Missouri. 

    8.  MARY FRANCES3 CLEMENT (EDWARD M.2, JOHNSON1) was born August 19, 1851 in Missouri, and died March 28, 1942.  She married ROBERT ARCHIBALD WOOLDRIDGE December 24, 1868 in Johnson County, Missouri, son of JOHN WOOLDRIDGE and SARAH LACY.  He was born January 08, 1851 in Saline County, Missouri, and died March 06, 1936 in Cass County, Missouri.

    Notes for ROBERT ARCHIBALD WOOLDRIDGE:
    1870 United States Federal Census > Missouri > Johnson > Kingsville
         
    Children of MARY CLEMENT and ROBERT WOOLDRIDGE are:
                  i.     SARAH ANN4 WOOLDRIDGE, b. 1870.
                 ii.     LILLIE WOOLDRIDGE, b. June 1877; m. DARRAH.
                iii.     WILLIAM WOOLDRIDGE, b. July 1879.
                iv.     GIRL WOOLDRIDGE, b. December 07, 1888, East Lynne, Johnson County, Missouri; d. January 09, 1899, East Lynne, Johnson County, Missouri.
                 v.     JESTIE? WOOLDRIDGE, b. December 1889.
                vi.     LANA WOOLDRIDGE, b. June 15, 1890.
               vii.     TWIN WOOLDRIDGE, b. June 15, 1890, East Lynne, Johnson County, Missouri; d. July 07, 1890, East Lynne, Johnson County, Missouri.


    Generation No. 3
    9.  JOHNSON4 CLEMENT (EDWARD J.3, EDWARD M.2, JOHNSON1) was born Abt. 1854 in Missouri.  He married CASSIE MORRELL.  She was born Abt. 1859 in Texas.

    Notes for JOHNSON CLEMENT:
    1880 United States Federal Census > California > Los Angeles > Westminster > District 29 
         
    Children of JOHNSON CLEMENT and CASSIE MORRELL are:
                  i.     WILLIAM E.5 CLEMENT, b. December 05, 1876, California; d. April 13, 1946, Orange County, California.
                 ii.     ALLIE CLEMENT, b. January 15, 1879, California; d. January 13, 1948, Los Angeles, California; m. WINSLOW.

     http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~jrbakerjr/missouri/archie.htm







    Killed in Lexington, Missouri 1866
    Read more: http://civilwartalk.com/threads/andersons-head-devil.22337/#ixzz20IBLFty5
     http://image1.findagrave.com/photos/2008/175/27791667_121434781765.jpg
    Birth: Jan. 1, 1846
    Moniteau County
    Missouri, USA
    Death: Dec. 13, 1866
    Lexington
    Lafayette County
    Missouri, USA

    Civil War Lieutenant, Outlaw. In 1861 Clement joined the Confederate guerillas under CSA Captain William "Bloody Bill" Anderson, and by the time he was 17 became Lieutenant. He was a small man, standing just over five feet tall and weighing about 130 pounds. His slight stature belied his ferocity, as he was known to be an expert pistol shot and fearless under fire. He was often referred to as "Little Archie Clement." He took a prominent role in all major operations of Anderson's unit, including the infamous Lawrence, Kansas raid where approximately 150 men were killed and the town burnt, as well as the Centralia Massacre in which 23 Union soldiers riding a train on furlough were robbed and shot. Upon Anderson's death, he took command of his unit until the Civil War ended. On February 13, 1866, he was thought to have been the leader of the outlaw gang consisting of the James brothers and other fellow guerrillas that held up the Clay County Savings Association in Liberty, Missouri (the first daylight US bank robbery) and also robbed the Alexander Mitchell and Company in Lexington, Missouri. In December 1866, Archie sent word to the military authorities in Lexington, Missouri that he and some men wanted to come into town and register for muster into the Missouri State militia provided they would not be bothered by soldiers. After being informed they would not be molested, he and 26 men rode into town armed to the teeth. They had dinner, drinks, enrolled, and was told to leave town, which they did. A few minutes later Arch and another man returned to the hotel bar. Hearing that he was back in town, Army commander Major Bacon Montgomery sent three men to arrest him. When the soldiers entered the saloon, Archie pulled out his guns and started shooting, ran out the door, and jumped on his horse. and rode off. He was shot down by hidden riflemen shooting out the courthouse windows. (bio by: RonMac)

    Burial:
    Arnold Cemetery
    Wellington
    Lafayette County
    Missouri, USA
    Plot: NW corner

    Maintained by: Find A Grave
    Originally Created by: RonMac
    Record added: Jun 24, 2008
    Find A Grave Memorial# 27791667


    Standing about five feet tall and weighing in at a stout 130 pounds, Archie Clement may have been the most feared—and perhaps the most sociopathic—of all Bill Anderson’s guerrillas. Clement was best-known for scalping and mutilating the corpses of Unionists—military or civilian—and served Anderson as a lieutenant during the massacres at Centralia. In one particular instance, a note was left on a dead Union man that read: You come to hunt bush whackers. Now you are skelpt. Clemyent skelpt you.Following Anderson’s death Clement took command of his guerrilla company and in the wake of Appomattox he refused to surrender. In 1866 Clement led a group of ex-bushwhackers (including Jesse James) on a violent crime spree in Missouri. After violently influencing the outcome of an election in Lexington, Missouri, Archie Clement was tracked to a saloon by Union soldiers. In the process of capturing Clement a gunfight erupted; with a bullet in his chest, Clement managed to escape and mount his horse. Shortly thereafter, Clement was shot off of his horse and Union soldiers reportedly found him downed in the street attempting to cock a revolver with his teeth.

    Read more: http://civilwartalk.com/threads/andersons-head-devil.22337/#ixzz20IBtfIFi



    The Beard Brothers
    Little known members of Quantrill's Guerrillas
    Cass and Johnson Counties, Missouri
    This information is from various sources.
    Some information is documented and some is not.
    As with any information on line, you should verify it yourself before accepting it as fact.     
    Corrections welcome - email:   JRBAKERJR

    William King, Kingsville, MO Namesake Grave Marker
    Old Kingsville, MO Schoolhouse


        The Beard brothers left Sumner County, Tennessee in 1859 and went to Cass County, Missouri. Samuel married Martha Emmerson and in 1860, Frank was living with them.
        They already had relatives in the area. One cousin was a schoolteacher who had the Younger brothers in his class. With the Kansas Jayhawkers raiding Cass and Johnson Counties almost daily, it wasn't long before the Beards were involved. Then the Civil War begain and, as Tennesseans, they supported the Southern cause. At least two of the brothers, and possibly four, joined Quantrill's Guerrillas.
        On 10 April, 1862, John Smith Beard was murdered by Jayhawkers in Cass County. He was the first brother to die for the South.
        On 6 September, 1863, Frank and Samuel Beard, Noah Webster, John Webster, William and Perry Hays, and Henry McAninch, were surrounded by eighty Federals and Jayhawkers in a house near Howard's Mill in Kingsville Township, Johnson County. It appeared a hopeless situation, but these desperate Guerrillas resolved to cut through it or die. 
       A pistol in each hand, and firing as they ran, they dashed out of the house at the nearest Federals, shoulder to shoulder.    
        At the first volley, both of the Beard boys fell dead. Then Perry Hays was shot through the heart. McAninch, bored through one arm and one leg, killed a Federal and climbed on his horse with the utmost difficulty.
        John Webster, as he fled, was literally run over by a Federal Lieutenant and crushed to the earth.  He lay on his back under the belly of the horse, it's rider above him reaching down and shooting at him as he was stretched out prostrate, and bruised and bleeding from the iron feet of the stallion, as seemingly ferocious as it's master. Webster rallied, however, almost instantly, and killed the Lieutenant as he sat above him on his horse.  His brother, Noah, seeing the desperate extremity he was in, came back to help him and was shot twice but not crippled in the effort. John Webster had now to go to Noah's assistance, which he did speedily on the Lieutenant's own horse, taking up his brother behind him and escaping without difficulty from all pursuit.
        In this savage combat, five Federals were killed, and three Guerrillas, the wounded Federals numbered eight and the wounded Guerrillas two.  Will Hays was not hurt, and as he and McAninch came out from the desperate press together, they ran upon two militiamen hurrying in the direction of the fight. Hays halted them, shot them, and took from the body of the youngest a list of the names of certain citizens whose houses were to be burnt the next day.
        Samuel and Frank Beard were buried side by side in Pleasant Hill Cemetery. Samuel's wife, Martha, was buried beside them when she died in 1884.

    Notes:
        John N. Edwards mistakenly lists Samuel Beard as William. Brother William was also in Cass, but went on to Abingdon, Illinois in 1863. He died there in 1906.
        Howard's Mill was located in Kingsville Township. It was a horse mill built by Joe Howard in 1860, for whom it was named. It no longer exists.



    Place name:Howard's Mill
    Description:In Kingsville Township. A horse mill built by Joe Howard in 1860, for whom it was named. Mr. Howard settled in this county in 1836. He died in 1908. (Ed. King; Ferguson's "Historic and Caravan Trails," WARRENSBURG STAR JOURNAL, April 3, 1931; HIST. JOHNSON 1881, 523)
    Source:Johnson, Bernice E. "Place Names In Six Of The West Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.



    TitleArchibald Clement (Arch or Little Archie)
    DescriptionCharcoal portrait drawing of Archibald Clement (sometimes spelled Clement) with a cigar in his mouth, dressed in a suit with a cravat and holding a pistol. Drawing is signed by the artist. Below the artist's signature is "Arch Clements" 
    written in different handwriting and black ink.
    Biographical NoteLittle Arch, or Archie, at age 17 became William ("Bloody Bill") Anderson's lieutenant. It is said that in one short year Clement eclipsed the record of every known guerrilla by killing 54 men. He was part of William C. Quantrill's famous raid on Lawrence, Kansas, August 21, 1863, and a major player in the Centralia, Missouri, massacre. After the Civil War he took up robbing banks until he was killed December 13, 1866, in Lexington, Missouri, at age 19.
    CreatorDillenbeck, A. L.
    DateCirca 1890s
    History of Johnson Co., MO 1881
    THE JOHNSON COUNTY MASSACRES
    Transcribed by James Baker
    Page 533 (Kingsville)
    Early in the late war, around this place, was a scene of considerable strife and hostile action by both parties. At first the people were principally on the side the south, and B. Hornsby was the only leader of the abolition party. In June 1861, the first secession flags were raised in the village. The unionists attempted to raise their flags on the same day, but failed for want of numbers, and the southern women took axes and cut
    the unionists' flagpoles to pieces. In October of the same year, Gen. "Jim" Lane, of Kansas notoriety, dashed into the town and sacked all of the stores. During the following winter (1862) Maj. Herrick, under Col. Gennison, dashed down upon the place and drove out all the southerners, and burned their dwellings. Near the village they took nine men prisoners, and on the following morning killed eight, and the ninth one
    they cut a swallowfork in his right ear, saying: "We'll know you when you are caught again", then set him at liberty. About this time, the Kansas clan of robbers set on fire a great number of the dwellings in the county. A person that was a witness says: "I counted one evening, while standing on Brushy Knob, one hundred sixty houses on fire". Slaves were ravished by these desperadoes in the presence of their master's
    family, and the women and children were driven out of their homes without a morsel of bread in the world, or money to buy food. On account of southern feeling, Mrs. Nancy Longacre and her daughter were taken prisoners, and sent to St. Louis. General Wm. King, the father of the King family, went south and did not return until the close of the war. To heap fuel upon the already kindled flames of the war, the unionists burned him, on the public streets, in effigy. When peace and quiet was being restored throughout the length and breadth of the land, and no one was dreaming of trouble, at the early dawn on May 7, 1865, about two hundred bushwackers under the daring leaders, Arch Clement, Dave Pool and Bill Anderson, swept down upon the quiet little village and commenced fire on the citizens that were just emerging from their night's repose. The citizens rallied for their lives with Capt. Leroy C. Duncan as their leader, but were so outnumbered that they could not withstand the assault of the raiders, who soon had possession of the town, which they left in ashes after robbing families of their money and clothing. On the evening previous to the massacre the vile murderers camped on Lause Run, a few miles away, in Cass county, and before they started for Kingsville, disposed of a prisoner by cutting his throat from ear to ear and leaving him on the spot. The following is a partial list of the dead and wounded: James Paul (M.), Abner Ryan, Walton Burris, W. H. Duncan, L. C. Duncan, S.F. Duncan and  Wm. Johnson.
    B. A. Crain, Wm. Dock and Hiram Rose were taken prisoners, but released. After this, soldiers were sentby the Governor for the protection of the citizens, but the war caused no further trouble.
    Source: http://www.rootsweb.com/~mojohnso/misc/MASSACRE.txt
    Kansas City Historical Soc., Kansas City, MO
    The following account is from the days of "Bloody" Bill Anderson and Quantrill's Raiders in Kansas &
    Missouri (1861 - 1865).  I'm pretty sure that the James Paul mentioned as killed/captured was James M.
    Paul, son of James A. Paul & Matilda Campbell.  James M. was born in 1829.  It's an interesting piece of
    history from the Civil War era.
    James Mark Paul.

    Clement, the outlaw leader

    Beginning in 1866, Clement led his supporters into a new profession: bank robbery, especially of banks associated with Missouri Unionists. On February 13, a group of gunmen carried out the first daylight, peacetime, armed bank robbery in U.S. history when they held up the Clay County Savings Association in Liberty, Missouri, stealing more than $58,000 in cash and bonds. The bank was owned and operated by former Union militia officers, who recently had conducted the first Republican Party rally in Clay County's history. The state authorities suspected Archie Clement of leading the raid and offered a reward for his capture. In later years, the list of suspects would grow to include Frank JamesCole Younger, John Jarrette, Oliver Shepard, Bud and Donny Pence, Frank Gregg, Bill and James Wilkerson, Joab Perry, Ben Cooper, Red Mankus and Allen Parmer (who later married Susan James, Frank and Jesse's sister). During the escape through the streets of Liberty, one of the gang shot dead an innocent bystander named George Wymore.[6] A string of robberies followed, many linked to Clement's gang. The hold-up most clearly linked to them was of Alexander Mitchell and Company in Lexington, Missouri, on October 30, 1866, in which they stole $2,000.

    Death

    As the pivotal election of 1866 approached, political violence flared across Missouri. Much of it was associated with Archie Clement, who harassed the Republican authorities who governed Missouri. On election day in November 1866, Clement led a group of some 100 former bushwhackers into the town of Lexington. Their gunfire and intimidation led to the defeat of the Republican Party in the election. In response, Governor Thomas C. Fletcher dispatched a platoon of state militia, led by Major Bacon Montgomery. Clement withdrew, only to return on December 13, 1866. Seeking to avoid a major battle in the center of town, Montgomery allowed Archie Clement to enroll his men in the state militia (as a joke, it seems); after the bushwhackers left, Clement went to the bar of the City Hotel for a drink.
    Seeing his opportunity, Montgomery dispatched a few men to apprehend Clement, who was wanted on a warrant for the Liberty robbery. The major's men found Little Arch drinking with an old friend and called out for him to surrender. Clement drew his revolvers and a wild gunfight ensued. Despite having sustained a gunshot wound to the chest, Archie managed to make it outside and onto his horse. Clement rode up the town's main street in an effort to escape only to be shot off his horse by a militia detachment stationed at the courthouse. Montgomery and his men approached the fallen bushwhacker, who, though mortally wounded, was trying to cock his revolver with his teeth. One of the soldiers asked, "Arch, you are dying. What do you want me to do with you?" Clement replied, "I've done what I always said I would do ... die before I'd surrender." Major Montgomery himself later stated of Clement's final moments, "I've never met better 'grit' on the face of the earth."[7]
    After Arch Clement's death, his organization continued to rob and be pursued by government troops. Out of this group rose Jesse James, who first achieved notoriety three years later.




     KINGSVILLE CEMETERY
     from the Fall 2012 Johnson County Missouri Historical Society BBulletin.

     Leona Hobbs sent us the histories of two cemeteries recently and said that though she had gleaned most of the information from other sources that she was glad to share. Thanks Leona!
    The vast expanse of territory purchased from the French in the early 19th century embraced the tiny spot upon which the village of Kingsville was to rise within a few decades. In the spring of 1804 when Congress of the United States saw it advisable to divide the territory, this spot became a part of the “District of Louisiana” as divided from the “Territory of Orleans.”
    Void of settlement, untouched except by the Indians and the wild creatures of the forest, the small stretch of land became a part of the state of Missouri. Ultimately, in 1821, it came into the Union as a representative unit of that state. The township, which derived its name from the village of Kingsville situated on the Missouri Pacific Railroad, was originally part of two townships, Madison claimed the southern half and Jackson the northern half. On May 1870,
    the boundaries of Kingsville Township were defined as being bounded on the north by Jackson Township, on the east by Madison Township, on the south by Rose Hill Township, on the west by Cass County line. Chair Knob, with somewhat less elevation than Centre Knob, lies approximately 200 yards north of the City of Kingsville. It was on Chair Knob that General William King, the father of the King family in Kingsville, laid out a family cemetery in 1856
    after the loss of a child. The original King Cemetery contained approximately two acres and was surrounded by a stone wall and planted with crab apple shrubs. It was to be a home on the south side of Chair Knob when Philip Isley and Nancy King returned after being married in 1864. Because Philip was in the Confederate Army, he and Nancy were married on
    horseback, with their pistols strapped in place, on Boat Mountain, in Arkansas. Eventually the Peoples Public Cemetery was added north of the King Cemetery and then a Catholic Cemetery “Mount Olivet” to the west. Both have since been enlarged and now comprise about 15 acres. On the south slope of Chair Knob, and built upon the foundation of the Isley residence was the home of the Elmer Moody family. General William King was buried in the cemetery July 26, 1870. The property for “Mount Olivet” was purchased and first used for a cemetery in 1881.
    Stahl Specialty is located just south of the cemetery, which has buildings on both the north and south sides of Missouri Pacific Railroad.
    Those serving on the Cemetery Board in 2012 are President-Gene McCloud, Vice President-Bob Shull, Secretary-Lorraine McCloud, Treasurer-Leona Hobbs. Others on the board are Herb Brockhaus, E.L.”Pete” Montgomery, George Connell and Michelle Connell.

     Johnson County Historical Society
    302 North Main Street
    Warrensburg, MO 64093
    Hours: 1-4 p.m. Monday—Friday or by appointment
    Phone (660) 747-6480
    Website www.jocomohistory.org
    Please friend us on Facebook for current updates!

    Archibald Clement (Arch or Little Archie)

    At age 17 became William ("Bloody Bill") Anderson's lieutenant. It is said that in one short year Clement eclipsed the record of every known guerrilla by killing 54 men. He was part of Quantrill's famous raid on Lawrence, Kansas, August 21, 1863, and a major player in the Centralia, Missouri, massacre. After the Civil War he took up robbing banks until he was killed December 13, 1866, in Lexington, Missouri, at age 19.

    jocomohistory fall 2012

    Leona Hobbs sent us the histories of two cemeteries recently and said that though she had gleaned most of the
    information from other sources that she was glad to share. Thanks Leona!
    The vast expanse of territory purchased from the
    French in the early 19th century embraced the tiny spot
    upon which the village of Kingsville was to rise within a
    few decades. In the spring of 1804 when Congress of the
    United States saw it advisable to divide the
    territory, this spot became a part of the “District of
    Louisiana” as divided from the “Territory of Orleans.”
    Void of settlement, untouched except by the
    Indians and the wild creatures of the forest, the small
    stretch of land became a part of the state of Missouri.
    Ultimately, in 1821, it came into the Union as a representative unit of that state.
    The township, which derived its name from the village of Kingsville situated on the Missouri Pacific Railroad, was
    originally part of two townships, Madison claimed the southern half and Jackson the northern half. On May 1870,
    the boundaries of Kingsville Township were defined as being bounded on the north by Jackson Township, on the east
    by Madison Township, on the south by Rose Hill Township, on the west by Cass County line. Chair Knob, with
    somewhat less elevation than Centre Knob, lies approximately 200 yards north of the City of Kingsville. It was on
    Chair Knob that General William King, the father of the King family in Kingsville, laid out a family cemetery in 1856
    after the loss of a child.
    The original King Cemetery contained approximately two acres and was surrounded by a stone wall and planted
    with crab apple shrubs. It was to be a home on the south side of Chair Knob when Philip Isley and Nancy King
    returned after being married in 1864. Because Philip was in the Confederate Army, he and Nancy were married on
    horseback, with their pistols strapped in place, on Boat Mountain, in Arkansas. Eventually the Peoples Public
    Cemetery was added north of the King Cemetery and then a Catholic Cemetery “Mount Olivet” to the west. Both
    have since been enlarged and now comprise about 15 acres. On the south slope of Chair Knob, and built upon the
    foundation of the Isley residence was the home of the Elmer Moody family. General William King was buried in the
    cemetery July 26, 1870. The property for “Mount Olivet” was purchased and first used for a cemetery in 1881.
    Stahl Specialty is located just south of the cemetery, which has buildings on both the north and south sides of
    Missouri Pacific Railroad.
    Those serving on the Cemetery Board in 2012 are President-Gene McCloud, Vice President-Bob Shull, Secretary-
    Lorraine McCloud, Treasurer-Leona Hobbs.

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