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January 11, 2012

Famous Residences in Warrensburg - History

444 East Market. Former home to Leonard Goodall. Inventor of the rotary powered mower. According to Wayne Swisher our expert, more than 5,000,000 mowers are sold each year in the world.  And the first one came from Warrensburg, Missouri.  On May 11, 1929, he married Eula Johnson, and they soon built a small two-bedroom bungalow at 444 East Market, a home they occupied until his death in 1971. The basement of that house became Goodall's first workshop, and the Goodall Corporation buildings were later built in the back yard and on a vacant lot next door.

206 East Market, Home of Senator Cockrell. He fought for the Confederate cause during the Civil War. After one year of enlistment he was promoted to lieutenant colonel and a few weeks later to colonel. He was noted for his courage and strict discipline and idolized for his devotion to the comfort and welfare of his soldiers.  He resumed the practice of law after 1865. In 1875, he was re-elected 4 times and served 30 years in the United States Senate--March 4, 1875 to March 3, 1905. Cockrell and William Warner - Southern Nationalist politicians, helped the Republican maintain the White House in 1908. He spent his home life at 206 E. Market Street, Warrensburg, Missouri. The house was torn down in the spring of 1962. 

123 North Street Home former residence of Carrie Nation 
Carrie and David Nation moved from Holden to Warrensburg at the address of 123 West North Street.

402 E Market St, former residence of major league baseball player Lou Fette.

110 Broad Street, former residence of Coach Phog Allen, famous basketball coach at Kansas University.  "The Allen's reside in Warrensburg in their attractive home at a handsome bungalow constructed of brick and stucco having eight large, airy, well-lighted rooms and supplied with all the latest and most modern conveniences."

If you have any more house, please email or post them to a comment. Thanks!
Where did Dale Carnegie live? 
A small one-room cabin on Mill Street in Warrensburg, Missouri
Young Willy Blind Boone lived with his mother, stepfather, and stepbrothers and stepsisters in a small one-room cabin on Mill Street in Warrensburg.

INDIVIDUALLY ELIGIBLE FOR LISTING IN THE NATIONAL REGISTER 
Davis Store, 311 North Main, One-part Commercial Block, c.1842/c.1900 
134 East Gay Street, Shingle Style Church, 
1893-1899 210 East Gay Street, Early Twentieth Century Prairie School Style Residence 
304 East Gay Street, Early Twentieth Century Queen Anne Style Residence 
117 West Gay Street, Late Nineteenth Century Queen Anne Style Residence 
121 West Gay Street, Late Nineteenth Century Gothic Revival Style Residence 
205 West Gay Street, Early Twentieth Century Mixed Style Residence 
209 West Gay Street, Early Twentieth Century Mixed Style Residence 
210 West Gay Street, Late Nineteenth Century Queen Anne Style Residence 
300 West Gay Street, Late Nineteenth Century Queen Anne Style Residence 
307 West Gay Street, Late Nineteenth Century Gothic Revival Style Residence 
323 West Gay Street, Late Nineteenth Century Queen Anne Style Residence 
408 West Gay Street, Early Twentieth Century Pyramidal Folk House 
215 West Market Street, Late Nineteenth Century Gable-and Wing Folk 
223 West Market Street, Late Nineteenth Century Queen Anne Style Residence. 
133 East Pine Street, Vernacular Purpose-built building. Hart’s Hamburger Restaurant, 1928. 
101 North College Street, Early Twentieth Century, Vernacular Jones Brothers Mule Barn, 
206 North College Street, Gothic Revival Church, 1909-1910 
104 Broad Street, Early Twentieth Century Prairie School Style Residence 
106 Broad Street, Early Twentieth Century Massed Plan-Side-Gable Folk House 
205 West Culton Street, Late Nineteenth Century Italianate Style Residence 
137 Grover Street, Early Twentieth Century Prairie School Style Residence 
209 Grover Street, Late Nineteenth Century Stick/Eastlake Style Residence 
211 Grover Street, Early Twentieth Century Queen Anne Residence 
307 South Holden Street, Early Twentieth Century Prairie School Style Residence 
314 S. Holden Street, Late Nineteenth Century Queen Anne Style Residence 
604 Jefferson Street, Late Nineteenth Century Gable-Front-and-Wing Folk House 
223 Madison Street, Early Twentieth Century Shotgun Folk House 133 East Pine Street, Early Twentieth Century, One-part Commercial Block 
300 North Holden Street, Late Nineteenth Century Romanesque Revival Style Church

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