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June 4, 2016

The Knobs of Knob Noster - How the City was Named

The Knobs of Knob Noster
In the vicinity of Knob Noster the land is made up of sandstone ridges on the southwest, and on the east it constitutes a beautiful rolling prairie of fertile farms. The Knobs are two prominent knolls, from which the town derives its name. They are both far above the surrounding country, and present a beautiful appearance in the midst of an almost level plain, from which these grotesque mounds stand out in striking contrast. We clip the following from the Gem, a weekly paper of Knob Noster, under date of November 28, 1879: Just northeast of Knob Noster are two hills known as the Knobs. On one of them is the residence of Mr. I. V. Dudley. On the other is nothing except a rank growth of grass and weeds. For some time there has been talk of the probable contents of this knob, but almost everybody laughed at the idea of it containing anything more than the surrounding land. However, there were a few who still thought there was a bonanza in the hill if it could only be got out. Last Saturday W. L. Shockley and R. H. Carr shouldered a pick and struck out for the knob. After a few hours' digging they were rewarded by finding the skeletons of several human beings, together with other curiosities, which were buried with the Indians, or mound-builders, or whoever they were. The early settlers, for many years, regarded these knobs as prominent landmarks. Indian tradition states that once a great battle was fought here, and that valuable treasures lie buried about these mounds. The true account will never be known, of that conflict, even if the shining gold, so long hid away, is unearthed. The bones exhumed from their last burial tell the story that they were human beings. To say anything further on this topic would be mere supposition.
from pp 489, 1881 History of Johnson County, MO
The Citizen., July 22, 1910

How Knob Noster (Missouri) Was Named

J.M. Shepard of Knob Noster writes concerning the origin of his town’s name:  “Knob Noster is situated at the foot of two beautiful hills or ‘knobs’, in western vernacular.  These knobs are green and grass grown to their summits and rise out of a flat prairie from which they can  be seen for many miles.  When the village was founded in the early fifties a schoolhouse was built and an eastern schoolmaster was employed to teach a pay school.  When he arrived at his place of employment he was struck with the beauty of the knob and, being exceeding proud of Latin dubbed them ‘Knobs Noster,’ or ‘Our Knobs.’  The villagers were struck with the name and named their town after the designation of their Latin loving schoolmaster.  The process of time seems to have worn the ‘s’ from ‘Knobs,’” –Kansas City Star
Knobs Summit - 
Missouri Mountain Peak Information 
Knobs is a mountain summit in Johnson County in the state of Missouri (MO). Knobs climbs to 912 feet (277.98 meters) above sea level. Knobs is located at latitude - longitude coordinates (also called lat - long coordinates or GPS coordinates) of N 38.77668 and W -93.552157.Anyone attempting to climb Knobs and reach the summit should look for detailed information on the Knobs area in the topographic map (topo map) and the Knob Noster USGS quad. To hike and explore the Missouri outdoors near Knobs, check the list of nearby trails.
Peak Type: Summit
Latitude: 38.77668
Longitude: -93.552157
Peak Elevation: 912 feet (277.98 m)
Place name: Knobs Description: Two prominent knolls in Washington Township near Knob noster. Now thought to be Indian mounds. 
(HIST. JOHNSON 1881, 489)  Source: Johnson, Bernice E. "Place Names In Six Of The West Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis. University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.
History of Knob Noster, Missouri from a 11 October 1956 Story
Sedalia Democrat Newspaper
1878 Knob Noster Grave Robbers
10 Most Haunted Places in Missouri
Downtown Knob Noster
By Mary Barile
Paranormal Historian
Missouri's haunting's reach back centuries to the Native Americans of the region, who had traditions for keeping the dead from returning to this world. Today there are dozens of haunted spots in the Show-Me State. Many of the sites are open to the public (such as the Lemp Mansion) or can be visited during special events.
1. Knob Noster
Right next to Whiteman Air Force Base is the town of Knob Noster (a "knob" being an old name for a hill or small mountain). At one time, as noted in The Haunted Heartland, a hermit lived up on the hill and as hermits do, kept to himself and avoided people as much as possible. The man had a slave who was well-liked by the locals, but one summer people realized they hadn't seen the servant in some time. The next time the hermit came to town he was asked about his slave but all he did was glare and walk away. Rumors of a murder began to circulate through the town.
One night there was a terrible lightning storm and someone reported that he had seen a lantern moving slowly along a ridge on Knob Noster, when a bolt struck the hill. The next day several men went up to check on the hermit and found him dead with a look of terror on his face. Not long after that people reported seeing the lantern moving along the ridge during storms, and the ghost light is still spotted 140 years later. Knob Noster is just off Route 50 in Missouri, right next to Knob Noster State Park, where the light still bobs on stormy nights. 
The Advocate Description: 
Arrested for Arson
Date: May 30 1884
Newspaper published in: Huntsville, AL
WARRENSBURG, MO., May 24.
G. P. Harrison was arrested yesterday for burning his saloon at Knob Noster last April in order that he might get the insurance, $2,600. The company, the Springfield Fire and Marine, in which Harrison was insured, paid the loss, and put a detective to work up the case. Harrison unbosomed himself to the detective, thinking him a friend, and acknowledged having burned his hotel at Blackburn once before for the insurance. His hotel at Knob Noster was attached yesterday by the company, and they will lose nothing by Harrison’s attempt to defraud them.
The St. Louis Republic - Warrensburg, Mo., Nov. 13, 1903 
Killing of Marshal Brendel Knob Noster
The special Grand Jury that has been in session hero for two weeks, today returned twenty-five Indictments. One of them is against William Roberts and Charles Hunter, charging murder in the first degree for the killing of Marshal Brendel at Knob Noster three weeks ago. 
JOHN HENRY BRENDEL Memorial Link
Rank: City Marshal
Panel: 44-E: 22Department: Knob Noster, Missouri, P.D. End of Watch: October 29, 1903
Cause: Beating
Age: 46
Years of Service: 5
Marshal Brendel was attempting to break up a crowd of suspects that were drinking in a public alley. He had responded to the scene several times that day but the crowd reassembled each time he left. Marshal Brendel returned for the third time and ordered the crowd to leave the area. He was struck on the back of his head with a large piece of wood. Marshal Brendel was in a coma for five days before succumbing to his injuries.

Wreck on Mo. Pac. at Knob Noster One of the Worst in History of the Road. 
7 Dead 35 Injured
Two Missouri Pacific trains, met in a head on collision Thursday morning one and a half miles east of Knob Noster make it one of the most disastrous wrecks in the history of the road. The dead number seven and the injured thirty-five, of whom It Is thought several will die. One Bates County man, Carl Snead of Hume, had his left leg injured. The cause of the wreck is said to be the misunderstanding of orders by one of the train crews. The trains were No. 3 and No. 12 and were running at a high rate of speed when they met. Both trains were badly damaged. The dead were taken to Knob Noster and the injured to the Katy hospital at Sedalia.



1908 Knob Noster Train Wreck
1908 Knob Noster Train Wreck

Missouri Pacific Train Wreck, Knob Noster, MO 1908


8 Killed, Knob Noster Train Wreck, 1908

Knob Noster, Train, 1912
Lightning Kills Missourian. Warrensburg, Mo. Mrs. Frances Hollenbach and three small children, who reside two and a half miles south of Knob Noster, were struck by lightning.  June 23, 1904





Knob Noster. Missouri 1898 Plat Map

Johnson County, Missouri Genealogy Trails
Source: "History of Johnson County, Missouri" by Ewing Cockrell, 1918
 Transcribed by  Karen Hammer -2009
WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP
Washington township was one of the first four townships of the county and originally comprised approximately the northeast quarter of the county. It was organized May 4, 1835. It was named for George Washington. The first wagon road laid out in the township was from Knob Noster to Kirkpatrick's mill in 1852.
Knob Noster.-One of the unusual physical features of the township is what is known as the Knobs, two prominent knolls located just north of the town of Knob Noster, from which the town derived its name. They both rise a considerable height above the surrounding country. Much conjecture and a great deal of unreliable tradition envelop the history of these mounds. The early settlers for many years regarded these knobs as prominent land marks. An Indian tradition is that a great battle was fought here at one time. Human bones have been exhumed from these mounds but the mystery of how they came there is still unsolved. There is also an Indian tradition that these mounds are the hiding place of valuable treasure which was buried here sometime in the past. Concerning the curiosity with which these mounds were viewed as late as 1879, the following article appeared in the "Knob Noster Gem," under date of November 28, 1879: "Just north of Knob Noster are two hills known as the Knobs. For some time there has been talk of the possible contents of these Knobs but almost everybody laughed at the idea of them containing anything more than the surrounding land. However, there were a few who still thought there was a bonanza in the hill if it could only be gotten out. Last Saturday, W. L. Shockley and R. H. Carr shouldered a pick and struck out for the Knobs. After a few hours' digging they found the skeletons of several human beings, together with other curiosities, which were buried with the Indians, Mound Builders or whoever they were."

Early Settlements-The first settler of the original Washington township of whom we have any record is said to have been John Leeper, who settled in what is now Grover township. Col. John Robinson states in the Johnson County History of 1881: "In about 1828, John Leeper. son-in-law of Peter Fisher, of Pettis county, settled in the woods in section 22, township 47 and range 25, and improved five or six acres. Just northeast of him in section 16 William Cheek settled about the same time and in 1831 built the old Gallaher mill in section 6, on Clear Fork." The first land entry by Cheek was November 30. 1832, in Montserrat township.
Joseph Lapsley came from Russell county, Kentucky, in 1837 and died in 1854. John Coy settled here in 1833 and died in 1850. He was also a Kentuckian. Spencer Adams, a native of North Carolina, is said to have settled in this township in 1835. (He made land entry in 1832.) He died in 1867. Ambrose Brockman, from Russell county, Kentucky, settled here in 1837 and died in 1848. James A. Gallaher was also a very early settler. Vally Hall, a Kentuckian, came here in 1835 and died in 1868. John Stewart, also a Kentuckian, came in 1834 and died in 1843. Samuel Graham from Kentucky, made his home here in 1834 and died six years later. Thomas M. Ramsey settled on section 14 in 1859. Jonathan Butler, Alexander and William Gregg. James Ray and George Gallaher were also pioneers who settled here in the thirties. A German named Strickland settled on section 12 in 1836 but a few years later, when the settlers began to locate within two or three miles of each other, he began to feel crowded and went farther south. Among others who settled here prior to 1840, were W. A. Williams, Jacob Knaus, Samuel Workman, W. H. DeArman, James Brown, Richard McCombs, Henry Hayes, Fred Houck, John Reed, Andrew Thompson, George Thornton, Samuel McCormack, Benjamin Howard, William Box, W. R. McCart.
At a general election held in Knob Noster on the first Monday in August, 1858, appear the names of A. Hargraves, Samuel McKeen and Jacob Knaus as judges, and J. C. Corum as clerk. All were sworn in August 2, 1858, by J. B. Mayes, justice of the peace.
(At this election two hundred and fifty votes were cast.)
Among the first to enter government land in this township were Richard Marshall, October 4, 1833; James Ray, March 1. 1834, and Henry Edwards, June 13, 1834.
Early Churches-The earliest church in what is now Washington township was Pleasant Grove church, a union building owned by the Cumberland Presbyterians and Southern Methodists in the south part of the township.
It was organized in 1853-54 by Rev. John B. Morrow. The building was erected since the Civil War and dedicated by Revs. J. H. Hint and Mr. Young.
Early pastors of this church were W. Gilliam, W. Compton, B. W. Pierce, E. Morgan, J. B. Morrow, J. Whitsett. B. F. Thomas, J. T. A. Henderson and L. H. Davis.
Old members were William Geery and wife, Daniel Adams, Susan Adams, Isaiah Kimzey and wife and C. P. Phillips.
The next churches organized were in Knob Noster town, and are included in the history of that town.
Early Schools-The first log school house erected in the township was a crude structure. 10 by 16 feet, located in the northeastern quarter of section 10. One log was cut out to admit light. The clapboard roof was held on by weight poles, the door swung on wooden hinges and was fastened by a latch made of wood. In 1837, another log school house was built along the same general line of architecture on the southeast quarter of section 11. Here Jesse Trapp and James Ford taught school for a time. In 1838 a log school house was built on section 23. This building was along the same general lines as the others with one log left out for a window. The seats were made of puncheons and the heating system consisted of a fire-place. James Cochran was the first teacher here. The next school house was erected in the old town of Knob Noster. This was built in 1856 and was of the frame type of building. In 1866, it was moved two miles northeast of the old town on the south half of section 12 in Oak Grove District No. 10.
Among the early teachers at Oak Grove school were D. D. Duncan, Miss Sophia Welsh, J. R. Rainwater, J. M. Bigley. Mrs. Anna Dunn, Reuben Reaves, W. R. DeLaney, Reuben Wade, Thomas Prather, William O'Bannon, W. H. Hatton, H. C. Sparrowhawk, J. P. Walker, H. T. Williams, J. E. Gatewood, J. H. Allen, and Everett Miller. Prairie Home school, in District No. S, succeeded an old school called Quail Trapp, built in 1866. The following were early teachers in this district: Miss M. Brown, B. C. Stephens, Thomas H. Jones, Miss Nellie Zimmerman, Charles B. Littlefield. Miss Laura Lutz, Miss Alice Wharton, Frank P. Langston, Davidson Grover, Peter Lynch, Miss Sallie Zoll, Miss Bettie Duffield, Miss Myra Houts and Miss Mollie Guihen, John McKeehan, Mrs. D. A. McCormick, J. P. Wallace, A. J. Sparks and John Byrne.
Justices.-The following are the justices of the peace of the township as far back as the county court records show, with dates of their election: 1842, Richard C. Wariner, Samuel Workman, William H. Collins; 1844, Jacob Knaus. Jacob Raper, Henry S. Pease; 1846, William Kirkpatrick; 1850, Hiram C. Key, Robert M. Maxwell, Squire Williams; 1852, Zachariah Clark, John Bobbitt; 1856, William P. Mayes, John Bobbitt; 1860, N. Fisher, John Bobbitt; 1862, Samuel Workman; 1870, A. E. Weidman, William Fisher; 1878, W. H. Anderson, B. R. Tompkins; 1882, J. W. Denison, H. J. Adams; 1886, P. D. Fitch, John S. Mayes; 1888, W. H. Anderson; 1890, L. B. Thomas, J. W. Mitchell, Taylor Kirkpatrick; 1896, John M. Kelly; 1898, A. M. Craig, A. W. Wheatley; 1900, J. M. Mitchell; 1902,.A. M. Craig, B. F. Summers; 1906, George L. Taylor, B. F. Summers; 1908, S. P. Caldwell, F. S. Denton; 1910, J. C. Metts, John T. Lay; 1914, Jacob H. Knaus, J. C. Metz.
County Officers.-The following are the county officers who have been elected from the township since 1882, with the dates of their election:
1892-George N. Hocker (Democrat), representative.
1894-96-George T. Gallaher (Democrat), surveyor.
1894-96-L. B. Thomas (Democrat), assessor.
1900-1904-T. J. Summers (Democrat), assessor.
1902-C. D. Thompson (Democrat), superintendent of schools.
1904-08-12-A. M. Craig (Democrat), public administrator.
1908-B. F. Summers (Democrat), county judge.
1912-14-Ed. S. Harte (Democrat), county judge.
County Road Improvements.-County road improvements made by Washington township since this system was established in 1911, were up to January 1, 1918, nineteen in number, and aggregated $1,224 furnished by the citizens of the township, and $1,025 by the county. In this particular Washington township ranks seventh among the townships of the county.
Organizations.-The following is a complete list of all organizations of every kind in Washington township. Full details of each organization are in separate chapters on the different organizations.
Churches-Baptist, Knob Noster; Catholic, Knob Noster; Christian, Knob Noster; Cumberland Presbyterian, Pleasant Grove; Cumberland Presbyterian, New Church: Latter Day Saints, Knob Noster; Methodist, Knob Noster; Methodist, South, Knob Noster; Presbyterian, Knob Noster.
1917 War Organizations-Red Cross, Knob Noster Branch.
Fraternal Organizations-Masons, Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias, Modern Woodmen, Mystic Workers, Royal Neighbors.
Miscellaneous Organisations-Swastikas.
Business Organisations-Bank of Knob Noster, Peoples State Bank.
Total number of organizations in township is nineteen.

KNOB NOSTER
 Biographical Sketch of E. C. Littlefield, Johnson County, Missouri, Knob Noster
From "History of Johnson County, Missouri," by Ewing Cockrell, Historical Publishing Company, Topeka, Cleveland, 1918.
******************************************
E. C. Littlefield, the prominent attorney of Knob Noster, Missouri, was born in 1868 in Knob Noster, the son of Lyman C. and Ellen Z. Littlefield.  Lyman C. Littlefield was the son of William Littlefield, a native of Weld, Maine.  The Littlefield family is of English descent. Two brothers emigrated from England to America in the earliest colonial days and from them the Littlefields in America have descended. Lyman C. Littlefield was a teacher in Knob Noster before the Civil War and one of the town's first merchants.  He also was the owner and manager of  the first lumber yard in the old town of Knob Noster.  During the Civil War, he was at one time a prisoner of war.  Escaping from the Southern army, he returned to his old home in Maine and for many years was engaged in the manufacture of shingles in that state.  Later in life, Lyman C. Littlefield returned to Johnson county, Missouri, where he became an extensive landowner, engaging in stock raising on a large scale. He was president of the Bank of Knob Noster for several years and it was he who placed this bank on its present firm, financial basis and secured for it the sound rating and prosperity it now enjoys.  Mr. Littlefield died January 5, 1901.  His wife had preceded him in death many years before, her death occurring in 1879.  Seven children were born to Lyman C. and Ellen Z. Littlefield, six of whom are now living: Charles B., Claremore, Oklahoma; William W., Kendrick, Oklahoma; Mrs. Lillian May Shumaker, Colorado Springs, Colorado; E. C., the subject of this review; Mrs. Nora E. Thompson, Erie, Kansas; and Lyman M., Lamonte, Missouri.  The early education of E. C. Littlefield was obtained in the public schools of Knob Noster, Missouri.  He later attended the Wentworth Military Academy at Lexington, Missouri and completed his education at the Missouri State University, where he was a student in the law school, graduating in the class of 1890.  After completing college, Mr. Littlefield was for six years a member of the law firm, Waddill & Brown, having an office in the New York Life building in Kansas City, Missouri.  In 1896, E. C. Littlefield came to Knob Noster and opened his law office and he has ever since been engaged in the practice of law in this city.  He has been city attorney for the past 20 years, which is sufficient evidence of the high esteem in which he is held. Mr. Littlefield states that he is no politician but has made it an invariable rule to "vote for the man."  In 1912, E. C. Littlefield was united in marriage with Mrs. Georgia (Hope) Lewis, the daughter of  Colonel John C. Hope, the well-known and influential politician of
Missouri.  Mr. and Mrs. Littlefield are numbered among Johnson county's best families.
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Knob Noster, one of the progressive towns of the county, is on the main line of the Missouri Pacific railroad about three miles from the Pettis county line.
The town is situated in sections 15. 16, 21 and 22. The old town of Knob Noster was located about a mile north of where the depot now stands and still contains a number of houses on its one broad street.
The present town came into existence when the Pacific railroad was built. William Wortham was perhaps the pioneer merchant in the old town of Knob Noster.
The first post office was established here in 1850 before any town or village was laid out. It was located at the residence of Andrew Thompson, who became the first postmaster. Other early postmasters here were James Morrow, John Satoris, Charles Vantillman, Robert Dawson, William Mayes, John A. Pigg, William Chester, Miss Jennie Chester and C. Cobb.
The "Knob Noster Gem" is one of the old newspapers in the county. Its first issue was printed May 31, 1878, with Harris & McFarland as editors and proprietors. It is now unusually well edited by E. T. Hodges.
Other newspapers published at Knob Noster from time to time were the "Farmer," 1872, the "Register," "Local," "Herald" and "Review."
The following are the churches of the town with dates of organization: Cumberland Presbyterian; Baptist, 1856; Catholic, soon after Civil War; Latter Day Saints, 1889; Methodist. 1865; Christian, 1866; Presbyterian, 1867; Baptist Negro; Methodist Negro.
The town has electric light service, two banks, high school, good oiled streets, a large well established brick plant and all lines of ordinary business.
The population, 1910, was 670.
The following is a list of city officers:
Chairmen.-1877, H. C. Coffman; 1878, P. O. Sullivan; 1879-80. B. R. Tompkins; 1881, J. H. Knaus.
Mayors.-1901-04, B. F. Summers; 1905-06, C. V. Huff, Jr.; 1907-12, A. M. Craig; 1913-14, J. H. Rothwell; 1915-18, A. M. Craig.
Aldermen.-1877, V. Hughes, C. Cobb, P. O. Sullivan, G. Hardey; 1878, V. Hughes, C. Cobb, H. C. Coffman, G. Hardey; 1879, V. Hughes, C. Cobb, P. O. Sullivan, G. Hardey; 1880, J. C. Winkler, J. Carr, G. O. Talpey, W. J. Workman; 1881, J. L. Winkler, C. B. Littlefield, A. D. Wilson, J. C. Miller; 1901, J. V. Campbell, L. P. Shafer, E. A. Shepherd, A. G. Hunter; 1902, J. M. Kendrick, J. C. Foster; 1903, C. B. Littlefield. G. C. Miller; 1904, J. N. Kendrick, G. N. Hocker; 1905. E. E. Thompson, W. W. Spiess; 1906, J. M. Kendrick, W. B. Daw, D. N. Saults; 1907, J. C. Metts, W. B. Daw; 1908, Wm. Shoemaker, D. N. Saults; 1909, J. T. Lay, J. C. Metts. J. C. Foster; 1910, J. T. Lay, J. W. Mclntosh; 1911. S. A. Spiess, Hill Hunter; 1912, S. J. Dudley, Jehu Hull; 1913, S. A. Spiess, Frank Jenks; 1914, C. W. Weidman, C. L. Saults; 1915, S. A. Spiess. Frank Jenks; 1916, C. W. Wiedman, C. L. Saults; 1917, J. M. Kendrick, Wm. Ragner; 1918, C. W. Weidman, C. L. Saults.
Clerks.-1901-06, George J. Taylor; 1907-09, Charles Y. Taylor; 1910-13, C. L. Saults; 1914-18.W. J. Carr.
Police Judges.--1901-04. J. C. Winkler; 1905-06, W. C. Knaus; 1907-08, J. M. Kinman; 1908-10, Mark Kidney; 1910-14, W. C. Knaus; 1915-18, J. C. Foster.
Marshals.-1881. T. E. Rigg; 1901-03. J. H. Brendel; 1904-06, J. W. Bailey: 1907-08, William Covey; 1909-10, George Kinman; 1910, W. C. Knaus; 1911-14, W. B. Arbogast; 1915-16, R. F. Clark; 1916, George Kinman; 1917, H. T. Hite, Hill Hunter; 1918, Hill Hunter, L. W. Scott.
Collectors.-1901-02, A. M. Craig; 1903, C. C. Hayes; 1904-06, J. W. Bailey; 1907-14. William Covey; 1915-16, R. F. Clark; 1916, George Kinman: 1917,
H. T. Hite; 1917-18. Hill Hunter.
Street Commissioners.-1901, A. M. Craig; 1903-06, B. P. Michael; 1907-15, R. F. Clark: 1916-18, George Kinman.
Treasurers.-1901-04, Ed S. Harte; 1905-08, W. T. Zuber; 1909-12, S. L. Doggett; 1913-18, A. S. Adcock.
Attorneys.-1901-08, S. G. Kelly; 1909-12, E. C. Littlefield; 1913-16. J. H. Knaus; 1917-18, E. C. Littlefield.
Johnson County, Missouri Genealogy Trails
 © 2006 - 2008 by Genealogy Trails  -  All Rights Reserved - With full rights reserved for original submitters. 

From Knob Noster.gov Site
Knob Noster is located on U.S. Highway 50, approximately 60 miles east of Kansas City, Missouri.  A short distance northeast of town there are two hills, called knobs. The hills have become a landmark for the community and are closely related to the organization and background of the town.
Knob Noster had its beginning in 1850 when a post office was established in the original “Old Town” settlement, located one mile north of the present town.  W.A. Wortham then settled in Knob Noster in 1854.  By 1860, when the Missouri Pacific Railroad made its way into the territory, the town had a population of 450, with 30 professions and businesses, a Masonic Lodge and seminary.  When the current owner of the land that would bring the railroad through town would not give up the land to make that possible, Sam Workman took 40 acres of his land and laid out the town and offered the railroad some of his property.  He then laid out a town one mile south of the original settlement. 
In 1867, the frame buildings that had been constructed on Main Street burned.  Brick to rebuild the buildings was acquired from a company located a short distance outside of town.  Although the buildings have changed a great deal from 1850, the atmosphere of hospitality and friendliness is still apparent in this community where Whiteman Air Force Base and Knob Noster State Park have become an integral part of the community life.
Originally, Knob Noster was primarily a farming community.  With the advent of Whiteman Air Force Base and the tourist attraction of Knob Noster State Park, the town's population has grown to the  present estimated count of nearly 2,800.
The city of Knob Noster has established and maintained public improvements that support a full service community.  Although the city remains relatively small, its location allows for a strong industrial and commercial business base, local sales tax revenue, and the development of a higher quality of life.
History
The knobs of the town's namesake are not only a geographical landmark for the town, but are also claimed to be the site of a battle of Native American tribes. Sometimes there are stories that gold or treasure is buried in the knobs. This can be neither confirmed nor denied.
Beginnings
When first settled, Knob Noster was part of Cooper County which took in all of the territory between the Osage and Missouri Rivers. By 1820, the population was sufficient in the area so that a division of Cooper County needed to be made. The new county was called Lillard County, Missouri, and it included what are now Lafayette and Johnson Counties, as well as all the areas south to the Osage River and west to the Missouri Border.  By 1834, the population was large enough, estimated at about 200 households, for Lafayette County to be divided into two counties. One retained the name Lafayette and the other was called Johnson County. On May 4, 1835, Johnson County was further divided into four townships: Jackson, Washington, Madison, and Jefferson. Knob Noster is located in what was named Washington Township.
Coal mining
In the 1870s Knob Noster was described as "the boomingest settlement in the county," in large part because of the vast coal deposits in the area. The eastern part of Johnson County held vast amounts of coal, some veins reaching thicknesses of four to five feet which greatly added to the prosperity of Knob Noster. Unfortunately that prosperity only lasted for a decade or so before the coal supplies were exhausted.
High school
The Knob Noster High School (KNHS) was organized in 1888, and at the same time, the requirements to complete a public school education were changed from five years to eight years, including three years of high school. The first class to enter the high school was very large according to contemporary accounts, which gave no figure of enrollment, but after three years, only two remained and received diplomas. Teachers in rural schools in the area at this time were paid between $25.00 and $35.00 per month. They boarded out and paid $8 to $10 for board and laundry.
Great fire
There was a great fire in Knob Noster in the mid 1880s that destroyed much of Knob Noster. Some of it was saved and the town was eventually rebuilt.
History
Knob Noster State Park is named for the nearby town which itself is named for one of two small hills or "knobs" that rise up in an otherwise flat section of Missouri. A local Indian belief stated that the hills were "raised up as monuments to slain warriors."Noster is a Latin adjective meaning our. Therefore Knob Noster translates as our hill.
The park was constructed during the Great Depression by the Civilian Conservation Corps and the Works Progress Administration. The CCC and WPA were both part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal a series of government funded programs designed to provide work for the unemployed workers of the Great Depression.[4] The men of the CCC and WPA built roads, bridges, camping areas, picnic areas, and park service buildings. The park, originally known as Montserrat National Recreation Demonstration Area, was transferred to the state of Missouri in 1946 and named for Knob Noster.

Battle of Blackwater: Early the next morning Pope’s force marched toward Knob Noster, Missouri. Pope ordered Colonel Jefferson C. Davis’s brigade to the Blackwater bridge where he was to force the bridge. Simultaneously a battalion of the 2nd Missouri Cavalry (“Merrill’s Horse”) moved northeast to complete the envelopment.

The John Maddox Gang of Knob Noster
Johnson County, Missouri
Source: Provost Marshal Records
During the years 1862 and 1863, the John Maddox 
gang terrorized most of Johnson County, Missouri. 
Unlike most of the Missouri wartime groups, they 
were not Southern Partisans.
They were an independent Company of Union 
Soldiers, called "Company Q", that was loosely 
attached to the Union Army Post at Knob Noster. 
(Company Q: fictitious outfit for cowards and 
 noncombatants)To distinguish their group each 
wore a large red badge around his hat crown. They 
were led by Capt. John Maddox (alias Capt. Beaver) 
and Lieut. William E. Chester (alias Lieut. Johnson).
There seems to be no record of them ever fighting 
soldiers or anyone else in a battle or even a skirmish. 
They were just a band of murderers and robbers, 
 hiding in partial Union uniforms, with the sanction 
of the U. S. Army.
They killed several Johnson County men, but they 
killed them by dragging them out of their homes at 
night and executing them in front of their families. 
 They robbed people who had almost nothing, taking 
money, clothing, bedding, food, horses, and other 
livestock, and small articles from the homes, leaving 
 them even more destitute than they were before. 
'In some cases they also burned homes.
Provost Marshal Records contain many affidavits 
signed by their robbery victims and widows of the 
murder victims.
Summarized, this is the contents of most of those 
affidavits.
Mr. Eppright states that in the fall of 1862 John 
Draper and George Draper were killed by John Ragner 
(Big John Ragner, there are two) and the John Maddox 
gang.
Miss Mary Runner states that she lives on the west 
side of the head of Clearfork in Johnson County. 
Big John Ragner, and the Maddox gang shot and 
 killed her brother and his son, in the yard near the 
house. At the same time, the house was robbed of 
bedding and other articles.
Mrs. Sarah Runner , her mother, agrees with Mary's 
statement. She can identify the men.
Mrs. Absher lives 6 miles south of Knob Noster. 
She states that her husband was taken from the 
house, shot and killed. William E. Chester was in 
the group.
Mrs Westlake lives 6 miles south of Knob Noster. 
She states the same night that Mr. Absher was killed, 
her husband was taken from the house, shot and killed. 
She can identify the men.
Mrs. Berry Greer lives 12 miles southwest of Knob 
Noster. She states that a number of men came to her 
house, took her husband out and shot him to death.
All of the above murders were in August 1863, except 
the Drapers, who were killed in the fall of 1862.
Nathan Fisher (a member of the gang) lives 7 miles 
north of Knob Noster. He states that the band went 
scouting and quite a number of them had goods 
obtained by plunder. Capt. Maddox and Lieut. 
Chester were along. A particular fuss was made over 
'one young man who had taken a woman's shawl.
Mr. Yager lives 6 miles north of Knob Noster. He 
states he even saw one man take cloth from a cradle.
Doc. Puckett lives in Knob Noster. He states that the 
band existed and was led by John Maddox and Wm. 
Chester.
Mrs. Mary Jane Walls lives on the east side of the head 
of Clearfork. She states that the band of Capt. John 
Maddox were at her father's house and rummaged 
through the house and trunks, taking many small 
articles. They also took two horses.
Mrs. Edith Dunovan lives in the same house and 
agrees with the above statement.
Mrs. Ben Walls lives on the east side of the head of 
Clearfork. She states that a band of armed men partly 
clad in soldier uniforms and partly in civilian clothes 
came to her house. Among them was Wm. Chester. 
They demanded the key to her safe and she gave it 
to them and they unlocked the safe. They asked for 
money. They took several small articles.
Miss Nancy Davis lives at her father, Squire Davis' 
house on the east side of the head of Clearfork. She 
stated many things that are of use to the prosecution.
Mrs. Widow Gallaher lives on the east side of the head 
of Clearfork. She was robbed of some goods from her 
house and two horses. she later found one of the horses 
in the lot of Big John Ragner.
Note: All of the above robberies occurred in the months 
of August and September 1863.
Mr. Coleman lives 12 miles south of Knob Noster. He 
states that John Maddox and his band came to his 
home many times. On one occasion, William Pulliam 
robbed him of a new saddle worth $12 and Maddox 
took the saddle from Pilliam and kept it. John Barnett, 
using the name of Henderson, robbed him of a mare 
worth $100. He recognized 10 or more of these men. 
David Amick forcibly, by thrat of violence, took one 
pair of wooden stirrups from him. The band pretended 
to stay at his home for several days one time. John W. 
Mulkey threatened to shoot him. John Maddox was using 
the name Capt. Beaver and Wm. Chester was using the name 
Lieut. Johnson.
Mrs. Maj. Neal lives on the head of Clearfork ten miles south 
of Knob Noster. She states that Doyle Maddox robbed her of a 
new bridle while the band was at her house. She recognized 
Joseph Mulkey among others. She was robbed of several articles. 
She saw them leading horses by her house. She saw Big John 
Ragner leading one gray mare she recognized as belonging to 
one of her neighbors.
Mrs. Sam. Craig and her son Master Granvill Craig
and her married daughter Penelope Dunkan live together 8 miles south of Knob 
Noster. They state that 6 of Maddox's men robbed them of $60 
 one night and that James L. Noake was the foreman and demanded 
the money, received it, then set fire to their house. The band came 
there often. They took a horse one time and a saddle another. They 
went through the house and trunks. Most of these men were personally 
known to this family.
Mrs. Jehue Robinson lives 2 miles west of Knob Noster. She states that 
 David Amick, Lafayette Shinkle, William Pulliam Jr.,  and James L. 
 Noakes entered the house and rummaged it generally and robbed her 
of several small articles. She saw John Maddox's company at her house 
often and can recognize most of them.
Mrs. Cap. Dawson lives 7 miles south of Knob Noster. She states that she 
was robbed of bedding and some small articles by 7 or 8 of Maddox's men.
William Glenn agrees with the aove statement and says that George Bonnet (Barnett?) and William Pulliam and others did the robbery. He lives 6 miles 
south of Knob Noster.
Mr. and Mrs. Larkin Hawkes live 6 miles northeast of Knob Noster and 
make  similar statements. 
Miss Poly Ann Kirkpatrick lives with her mother 8 miles north of Knob 
Noster. Her statement is against two of the Band.
Mrs. Sarah Wyatt lives 2 miles south of Knob Noster. She states that John 
Barnett of Maddox's Company robbed her infant son of a bridle worth $5, 
 this in her presence and with her knowledge. After some of John Maddox's 
 Company had been arrested, John Ragner and George Barnett came out of 
the brush and called for anything to eat and told her they shot the soldiers 
 after them.
Widow Nelson lives 12 miles north of Knob Noster. She states that John D. 
Mulkey and others robbed her home.
Mrs. Harvey Dearman lives 5 miles west of Knob Noster. She makes a case 
 against Big John Ragner individually.
Mr. Addison Draper and wife live on the east side of the head of Clearfork. 
Were robbed by a portion of John Maddox's Company. Can identify John Ragner. 
 Robbed of goods and horses.
Mrs. John Owsley lives 12 miles south of Knob Noster. She was robbed by 
Lafayette Shinkle.
Mr. Bowlin Coats lives 9 miles south of Knob Noster. He was robbed by 
 Maddox's Band of two horses in daylight. Robbed him also.
Mr. Pleasant Oglesby, Mrs. Dodge Far, Master Peak (son of Capt. Peak), Mrs. 
 Simeon taylor, Mrs. Little, and daughter, Mr. James Murphy, Mr. David Marr, 
 Mr. Nichols Townsley, Mrs. Irwin, Capt. Finley of 7th Regt. M.S.M., 
all made important 
statements useful in court.
Lewis Harrison, statement against John D. Mulkey for robbing him.
Mrs. Samuel Staff, statement against John D. Mulkey for robbing her 
of goods and clothing.
Mrs. Harriett Nelson, statement against William A. Fisher for robbing her house.
R. B. Bradford, statement against Wiley Maddox and David Amick for stealing a 
horse. 
John Walker, statement against John W. Mulkey for robbing him.
Josiah Gilkeson states that the gang robbed him of a mule. Names several 
gang members.
William Frist states that the gang robbed him of four horses.
Note: In Feb. 1863, an arrest warrant was issued for John D. Mulkey for 
stealing. When overtaken, he was riding a yellow horse that was the 
property of Benjamin 
Walls and carrying a shotgun stolen from Richard Scruggs. The two men took 
back the horse and gun, then the arresting officer, William H. P. Thompson, 
released Mulkey.
Note: Nathan Fisher told that Wiley Maddox showed him where they had built a fire to divide the money they had robbed from John Walker of Lafayette County last winter.
Note: There were men in John Maddox's Band named John D. Mulkey and John W. Mulkey. One witness called them "Squint eyed John Mulkey" and "Long John Mulkey".
Members of the gang named by witnesses include:
Capt. John Maddox
Lieut. William E. Chester
Wiley Maddox
Doyle Maddox
John D. Mulkey
John W. Mulkey
Joseph Mulkey
Henry Mulkey
James Stephens (or Stevens)
Nathan Fisher
William A. fisher
Hyrum Fisher
John Ragner
William Pulliam, Jr.
John Barnett
George Barnett
Thomas Short
David Amick
Lafayette Shinkle
James L. Noakes
George Bomar
Jesse Bomar
James E. L. Taylor
William Powel
Shade Edwards
Enoch Randolph
Elijah Smith
Samuel Workman
Robert Maxwell
James Johnson
Lewis Woolery
The gang was eventually broken up and some members arrested. John went to Gratiot Street Prison in St. Louis on 27 Feb. 1864. John Maddox was released on 19 April 1864. Doyle Maddox was also sent to St. Louis, but escaped. The two John Mulkey's seem to have died in 1864 and 1865. William Pulliam was arrested twice for larceny in 1864 and paroled both times. William E. Chester, Wiley Maddox and Hyram Fisher were sent to Gratiot 18 Jan. 1864. Wiley was later paroled. William E. Chester seems to have continued his career as an Army Lieutenant in Knob noster, in 1865.
Several gang members are listed by "The History of Johnson County" as founding members of a church in Johnson in 1870, and as "prosperous farmers", so apparently most of their crimes were swept under the rug by the Federal Army and the Government.

James R. Baker Jr.
Dr. Lee C. Miller
(Leander Caruth MILLER, M.D.)

A little known member of Quantrill's Guerrillas
Knob Noster, Johnson County, Missouri 
The genealogical information is the results of my own research. Some information is documented and some is not. As with any information on line, you should verify it yourself before accepting it as fact.     
The Family
Leander Caruth (Lee) MILLER, was born 29 Oct 1828 in Callaway County, Missouri, son of Abraham and Polly (Rule) Miller.
Lee died 2 Aug 1913 in Chicago, Illinois. He was buried in Knob Noster Cemetery, Johnson County, Missouri, with his second wife Mary Ellen.
He was married three times.
Wife 1: Belle Shanks (d. 1860), child: William E. Miller
Wife 2: Mary Ellen Nesbit (d. 1881) Two children:
Minnie B.- b. Oct. 1861 married L. W. Dallas (Shelby Co., Mo.)
John W. Miller (lived in Chicago in 1913)
Wife 3: Emma T. DODDS  Married: 27 Aug 1889
His parents were from the "Millers of Millersburg" family that went from Pennsylvania to Bourbon County, Kentucky andfounded Millersburg, Kentucky, then later some of them moved to Missouri and founded Millersburg, Missouri.
They were:
Father: Abraham MILLER was born 4 Jul 1786 in Holmes, Delaware County, Pennsylvania, died 22 Dec 1862 in Fulton, CallawayCounty, Missouri.
Mother: Mary or Polly RULE was born about 1795 in Bourbon County, Kentucky. She died in 1848 in Missouri.
Abraham and Polly were Married: 25 May 1813 in Bourbon Co, Kentucky
Their Children:
1. John Warden MILLER b: ABT 1814 in Bourbon County, Kentucky
2. William Byram MILLER b: 14 Jun 1817 in Kentucky
3. Minerva MILLER b: Aug 1821 in Missouri
4. James Walker MILLER b: 4 Aug 1821 in Missouri
5. Noah Worcester MILLER b: ABT 1824 in Missouri
6. Leander Caruth (Lee ) MILLER b: 29 Oct 1828 in Callaway County, Missouri
7. Lycurgus MILLER b: 20 Aug 1832 in Callaway County, Missouri
8. Vernile MILLER b: 1835 in Missouri
9. Ulysses Telemachus MILLER b: 7 Jul 1826 in Callaway County, Missouri


History of Johnson County, Missouri 1881
L. C. MILLER,
physician, was born in Callaway county, Missouri, October 29, 1836.  His father, Abraham Miller, who was a native of Kentucky, had emigrated to Missouri in 1818 and settled in Callaway county in 1819, and by occupation was an agriculturist, and continued to reside in the above named county until his death in 1862.  The doctor's mother was also a native of Kentucky.  Born and raised in Bourbon county, and was the daughter of Capt. Rule, he being a Captain under Col. Thompkis, commanding in the war of 1812.  She died in the year 1848.  The doctor spent his youth on a farm, and his first lessons were taken in the common school and afterward he attended the high school at Independence, Jackson county, Mo.  After quitting this school he went to California, where he remained five years.  Returning, he then entered the Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia and graduating in 1857.  Returning to his native state he located in Shelby county and at once entered upon his practice and in a short time he was in the enjoyment of a lucrative practice, it extending into Jackson and Cass counties.  In 1876 he came to Knobnoster and resumed his practice.  The doctor has been twice married, first to Miss Shanks, niece of Col. Shanks.  She died in 1860, leaving one child, William E.  For his second wife he married a Miss Nesbit, daughter of John Nesbit of Shelby county, and in 1881 she died, leaving two children: Minnie B. and John W.
History of Johnson County, Missouri 1918
Dr. L. C. Miller, a native of Callaway county. Missouri, born October 29. 1836 engaged in the practice at Knob Noster in 1876. He graduated from the Jefferson Medical College at Philadelphia. Pennsylvania, in the class of 1857 and was engaged in the practice of his profession in Shelby county prior to coming to this state.


Dr. L.C. Miller - A Missouri Guerrilla
Sunday Sedalia Capital dated February 1910.
Dr. L .C .Miller of Knob Noster has given a most interesting account of the 
stirring times of the late Civil War to the Johnson County Star. Uncle Billy 
Jackson of Higginsville, who is eminently qualified to judge, says it is one 
of the most authentic descriptions of those troubulous times he has ever seen.
Few people realize that Dr. L. C. Miller, alert, sprightly and active man that 
he is, was born more than 85 years ago. He looks not more than 65 or 70, 
and his gait and bearing betoken a superb physique which any man might 
envy .His life has been such as might be expected of one in whose eyes, 
even at 4 score, the light of venture still gleams .
We prevailed upon the Doctor to talk of his earlier days, much against his 
desire. Those days are gone, said he, and I have always steadfastly refused 
to discuss my life story or talk for publication. However, I am now an old 
man and perhaps I could tell you some facts of interest. I have lived many 
years and seen many changes.
I have been identified with more interesting epochs in our country's history, 
and I might say that by birth and training, I am distinctively American, 
and more than that, I am a soldier. My Grandfather belonged to Eight Horse 
Harry Lee's command, My father was a soldier in 1812, my oldest brother 
took place in the Florida Indian War, another brother was in the Mormon 
War, a third in the Mexican war. One brother and myself were southern 
soldiers in the war between the states. My father came to Missouri in 1848 
and settled in Callaway Co. on Miller"s Creek, about 10 miles west of Fulton. Millersburg yet has his name. Life was a struggle in those days. I went west, 
in 1852 with five others. For several years I stayed in California digging for 
gold, and in 1856, I started for home on shipboard from San Francisco. We 
came Through Central America, and even in those days there was tumult and revolution where we have recently heard so much of Zelaya. We came home 
by way of New Orleans and the Missouri River. The last stage of our journey 
was made by land, and the evening we reached St. Louis there was a terrific breaking up ice on the river and an immense damage was done to shipping. 
The ice carrying everything before it. 
"You saw lots of fighting during the civil war, did you not, the Doctor was asked. "Yes I saw much service, Hard service, too, for I was with Quantrell." and here the veteran's eyes flashed. "I was captain of a company of 90 men and was with Price's army during the first year., taking parts in the fights at Rock Creek, Carthage, Lexington, Fort Scott, Springfield and many minor skirmishes. We enlisted for 9 months, and after that nearly all of Price's men went into the regular Confederate Service. At this time western Missouri was in a state of terror because of the depredation and ruin wrought by Kansas on our western border. Quantrell, with about 40 men was doing all he could to defend the border, but his source was too small for any except bushwhacking methods. There was a remarkable man-Quantrill. He was about my height. I am five feet ten and a half, but not quite so heavy. He was straight and well formed, light hair, blue eyes, a Roman nose, and fair skin. He was generous, kind and unassuming, yet born to command. He kept his own counsel, and when he made up his mind to do anything his determination was such, backed by courage, and by loyal followers, that nothing could prevent him from carrying out his plans. There was 83 of us, and no man in his command ever flinched or refused to follow him. He was a gentleman in his instincts and I have often heard his say he would shoot any man who would abuse or insult women or children.
Some people think Quantrell and his men fought on their own responsibility. This is not so. They were regular Confederate soldiers. Quantrell himself had a captain's commission from General Price, and later a colonel's commission from the Confederate War Department. His Commission authorized him to operate on the Missouri-Kansas border as a partisan ranger. Many people looking back over the scenes of Missouri warfare forget a certain order that was issued by the federal commander of Missouri in 1862. The order was that all federal officers and soldiers should kill every man found bearing arms. It will be remembered that Kansas men were laying waste our border and that hundred of homes were being ruined. When Quantrell read the order he called his men into line and advised all who wanted to leave the command to go south; but as to him he intended to stay in western Missouri and help the federal authorities carry out that order. Every man spurred forward to his side. There were 40 of us. That order gave rise to the killing of prisoners. They followed it up and we were forced to do the same thing. I could relate to you many stirring incidents. Quantrell's band was hard to handle. We could whip 4 or 5 times our number, because we fought at short range with six-shooting pistols and short six - shooting rifles. We could fire from 24 to 36 times without reloading. The enemy would discharge their arms at long range and we would then rush in upon them. No body of men could stand such a charge. They would run and we would pursue. Many more were killed from behind than from in front. We furnished horses and arms to no less than 300 southern men who wanted to go south and we took them all from the federals. I could tell you about the fight at Wellington, Lafayette County, in June 1862 at Magee's Lane the following month, at Lone Jack in May, one of the bloodiest battles we ever fought in Missouri, when we with 80 recruits for Price's army engaged three companies of Federals under Major Foster, a soldier and gentleman from the ground up. The loss was severe on both sides. Three days before Lone Jack we had a hot fight at Independence. We spent the following winter with Price's army. In 1863 George Todd, with 23 men returned to Jackson County. At Blue Springs our 24 men routed 84 and only 26 of the bunch sent out to capture us got back to town. We had two men slightly wounded.
The most remarkable achievement of Quantrill's forces and to my mind the most remarkable in all the history of warfare, was the Lawrence, Kansas, raid. We left the Grand River ,in Cass county, Aug.21,1863, with 297 men, for Lawrence. It was 5 in the afternoon. At 5 the next morning we reached Lawrence, 80 miles westward. At 10 o'clock the town was in ashes and many federal soldiers slain. They begged to be taken prisoners, but Quantrell reminded them of General Halleck's orders and of the hundreds of old men they had killed in Missouri. There were 350 federals stationed at Lawrence. On our return to Missouri we were pursued by more than 2000 soldiers from Kansas City but we arrived at Grand River timber in safety after a skirmish in which we killed not less than fifty. We had traveled 160 miles , 297 of us, without eating, sleeping or feeding our horses.; fought twelve hours out of forty and only lost five men, but had spread death and destruction in our track. It sounds like a fable but it is true. We had two objects in going to Lawrence, one was to seek revenge, the other was to let Kansas know that fire would burn on the west side of the state line. Of course a howl went up and they said we killed women and children, expecting the Confederate government would withdraw us; but Jeff Davis knew what was going on along the border. The fact is there was one boy killed and one woman wounded inadvertently. In 1864, sixty-five of us under Todd, killed all but one out of 100 federals at the noted battle of Centralia. We did not go south that fall as we knew the war would soon be over.
There were many interesting incidents in connection with my career as a trooper, some of them funny even under grim circumstances. In the late summer of 1864 I went to Salt Lake as wagon master with a mule train. I did this again next year, came home and made a winter trip to Denver. On the return trip a terrible snow storm overtook us. It snowed for four days and the lead teamster could not follow the road. I walked for 8 days, frequently striking drifts up to my shoulder. Several of our men were badly frozen and lost toes and ears. In the spring of 1866 I went to Philadelphia and took a Medical course and after graduating returned to Missouri.
I do not regret my part in the Civil War. We were fighting for a principle, a constitutional right, and right of local self government and state rights. These principals are eternal as truth itself and no man who eore the gray, as an honorable soldier, need to apologize to posterity.” ------ Feb. 1910. Knob Noster.


Lee served with Regular Confederate units under General Price for nine months, then rode with Quantrill's group for most of the war, as both a soldier and doctor. He attended the Quantrill Reunion August 17, 1909 in Independence, Mo.
Civil War Regular Service:

Miller, L. C.
Rank: Private
Conflict: Civil War
Side: Confederate
Type of Unit: Cavalry
Organization: Missouri State Guard Co. E
Name of Unit: 1st Missouri Cavalry
MILLER, L. C.
Rank: Private
Conflict: Civil War
Side: Confederate
Type of Unit: Cavalry
Organization: Missouri State Guard Co. E
Name of Unit: 1st Regiment Cavalry Volunteers CSA
Death Record:
Lee C. Miller
Death Date: 02 Aug 1913
Death Place: Chicago, Cook, Illinois
Gender: Male
Race : white
Death Age: 84y 9m 5d
Estimated Birth Year:
Birth Date: 27 Oct 1828
Birthplace: Calloway Co., Mo.
Father: Abraham Miller
Father's Birthplace: Mo.
Occupation: physician
Street Address: 354 E. 53rd Street
Burial Place: Knob noster, Mo.
Burial Date: 04 Aug 1913
Film Number: 1287682
Digital Folder Number: 4005075
Image Number: 80
Knob Noster Cemetery
Dr. L. C. Miller 1828-1913
wife: Mary Ellen 1843-1881 
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~jrbakerjr/missouri/leemiller.htm 
James R. Baker, Jr.
As will be seen by the following, Dr. Miller has given out in interesting Quantrill story for publication. This appeared in the Sunday Sedalia Capital; Feb.1910
Dr. T. C. Miller of Knob Noster has given a most interesting account of the stirring times of the late Civil War.to the Johnson County Star. Uncle Billy Jackson of Higginsville, who is eminently qualified to judge, says it is one of the most authentic descriptions of those troublous times he has ever seen. Few people realize that Dr. L. C. Miller, alert, sprightly and active man that he is, was born more than 85 years ago. He looks not more than 65 or 70, and his gait and bearing betoken a superb physique which any man might envy. His life has been such as might be expected of one in whose eyes, even at 4 score, the light of venture still gleams. We prevailed upon the Doctor to talk of his earlier days, much against his desire. Those days are gone, said he, and I have always steadfastly refused to discuss my life story or talk for publication. However, I am now an old man and perhaps I could tell you some facts of interest. I have lived many years and seen many changes. I have been identified with more interesting epochs in our country's history, and I might say that by birth and training, I am distinctively American, and more than that, I am a soldier. My Grandfather belonged to Eight Horse Harry Lee's command, My father was a soldier in 1812, my oldest brother took place in the Florida Indian War, another brother was in the Mormon War, a third in the Mexican war. One brother and myself were southern soldiers in the War Between the States. My father came to Missouri in 1848 and settled in Callaway Co, on Miller’s Creek, about 10 miles west of Fulton. Millersburg yet has his name. Life was a struggle in those days. I went west, in 1852 with five others. For several years I stayed in California digging for gold, and in 1856, I started for home on shipboard from San Francisco. We came through Central America, and even in those days there was tumult and revolution where we have recently heard so much of Zelaya. We came home by way of New Orleans and the Missouri River. The last stage of our journey was made by land, and the evening we reached St. Louis there was a terrific breaking up ice on the river and an immense damage was done to shipping. The ice carrying everything before it. “You saw lots of fighting during the civil war, did you not, the Doctor was asked. "Yes I saw much service, Hard service, too, for I was with Quantrill." and here the veteran's eyes flashed. "I was captain of a company of 90 men and was with Price's army during the first year. taking parts in the fights at Rock Creek, Carthage, Lexington, Fort Scott, Springfield and many minor skirmishes. We enlisted for 9 months, and after that nearly all of Price's men went into the regular Confederate Service. At this time western Missouri was in a state of terror because of the depredation and ruin wrought by Kansas on our western border. Quantrill, with about 40 men was doing all he could to defend the border, but his source was too small for any except bushwhacking methods. There was a remarkable man-Quantrill. He was about my height. I am five feet ten and a half, but not quite so heavy. He was straight and well formed, light hair, blue eyes, a Roman nose, and fair skin. He was generous, kind and unassuming, yet born to command. He kept his own counsel, and when he made up his mind to do anything his determination was such, backed by courage, and by loyal followers, that nothing could prevent him from carrying out his plans. There was 83 of us, and no man in his command ever flinched or refused to follow him. He was a gentleman in his instincts and I have often heard his say he would shoot any man who would abuse or insult women or children. Some people think Quantrill and his men fought on their own responsibility. This is not so. They were regular Confederate soldiers. Quantrill himself had a captain's commission from General Price, and later a colonel's commission from the Confederate War Department. His Commission authorized him to operate on the Missouri-Kansas border as a partisan ranger. - Many people looking back over the scenes of Missouri warfare forget a certain order that was issued by the federal commander of Missouri in 1862. The order was that all federal officers and soldiers should kill every man found bearing arms. It will be remembered that Kansas men were laying waste our border and that hundreds of homes were being ruined. When Quantrill read the order he called his men into line and advised all who wanted to leave the command to go south; but as to him he intended to stay in western Missouri and help the federal authorities carry out that order. Every man spurred forward to his side. There were 40 of us. That order gave rise to the killing of prisoners. They followed it up and we were forced to do the same thing. I could relate to you many stirring incidents. Quantrill’s band was hard to handle. We could whip 4 or 5 times our number., because we fought at short range with six-shooting pistols and short six-shooting rifles-we could fire from 24 to 36 times without reloading . The enemy would discharge their arms at long range and we would then rush in upon them. No body of men could stand such a charge. They would run and we would pursue. Many more were killed from behind than from in front. We furnished horses and arms to no less than 300 southern men who wanted to go south and we took them all from the federals. I could tell you about the fight at Wellington, Lafayette County, in June 1862 at Magee's Lane the following month, at Lone Jack in May, one of the bloodiest battles we ever fought in Missouri, when we with 80 recruits for Price's army engaged three companies of Federals under Major Foster, a soldier and gentleman from the ground up. The loss was severe on both sides. Three days before Lone Jack we had a hot fight at Independence. We spent the following winter with Price's army. In 1863 George Todd, with 23 men returned to Jackson County. At Blue Springs our 24 men routed 84 and only 26 of the bunch sent out to capture us got back to town. We had two men slightly wounded. The most remarkable achievement of Quantrill’s forces and to my mind the most remarkable in all the history of warfare was the Lawrence, Kansas, raid. We left the Grand River, in Cass County, Aug.21, 1863, with 297 men, for Lawrence. It was 5 in the afternoon. At 5 the next morning we reached Lawrence, 80 miles westward. At 10 o'clock the town was in ashes and many federal soldiers slain. They begged to be taken prisoners, but Quantrill reminded them of General Halleck's orders and of the hundreds of old men they had killed in Missouri. There were 350 federals stationed at Lawrence. On our return to Missouri we were pursued by more than 2000 soldiers from Kansas City but we arrived at Grand River timber in safety after a skirmish in which we killed not less than fifty. We had traveled 160 miles , 297 of us, without eating, sleeping or feeding our horses.; fought twelve hours out of forty and only lost five men, but had spread death and destruction in our track. It sounds like a fable but it is true. We had two objects in going to Lawrence, one was to seek revenge, and the other was to let Kansas know that fire would burn on the west side of the state line. Of course a howl went up and they said we killed women and children, expecting the Confederal government would withdraw us; but Jeff Davis knew what was going on along the border. The fact is there was one boy killed and one woman wounded inadvertently. In 1864, sixty-five of us under Todd, killed all but one out of 100 federals at the noted battle of Centralia. We did not go south that fall as we knew the war would soon be over. There were many interesting incidents in connection with my career as a trooper, some of them funny even under grim circumstances. In the late summer of 1864 I went to Salt Lake as wagon master with a mule train. I did this again next year, came home and made a winter trip to Denver. On the return trip a terrible snow storm overtook us. It snowed for four days and the lead teamster could not follow the road. I walked for 8 days, frequently striking drifts up to my shoulder. Several of our men were badly frozen and lost toes and ears. In the spring of 1866 I went to Philadelphia and took a Medical course and after graduating returned to Missouri. I do not regret my part in the Civil War. We were fighting for a principle, a constitutional right, and right of local self-government and state rights. These principals are eternal as truth itself and no man who wore the gray, as an honorable soldier, need to apologize to posterity. Feb. 1910 Knob Noster, Gem
Submitted to the Johnson County, Missouri USGenWeb site by Dorothy Bonar ©1999 dotntoto@iland.net

Date: May 30 1884
Newspaper published in: Huntsville, AL
Arrested for Arson
WARRENSBURG, MO., May 24.
G. P. Harrison was arrested yesterday for burning his saloon at Knob Noster last April in order that he might get the insurance, $2,600. The company, the Springfield Fire and Marine, in which Harrison was insured, paid the loss, and put a detective to work up the case. Harrison unbosomed himself to the detective, thinking him a friend, and acknowledged having burned his hotel at Blackburn once before for the insurance. His hotel at Knob Noster was attached yesterday by the company, and they will lose nothing by Harrison’s attempt to defraud them. 
John William Rothwell, born 25 Apr 1840 north of Knob Noster, Mo; parents came to Johnson County from Albemarle Co, Virginia in 1839. Enlisted in Co H, 2nd Mo Infantry, Confederate Army, killed at Battle of Corinth, Mississippi 4 Oct 1862, burial site unknown.
Clifton Edward Bondurant, buried in Knob Noster Cemetery
He was a private in the 27th Mounted Missouri Infantry at the Battle of Lexington, wounded and captured. Released and promoted to Lieutenant. Then became a Captain in the 5th Provisional Regiment.
I have a book entitled "Johnson County in the Civil War" and it includes him in there as being in charge of Company G of the Fortieth Enrolled Missouri Militia.
Civil War Veterans KNOB NOSTER CEMETERY
Beard, Robert L. 2 Apr 1828 -28 Nov 1866. Co. F, 1st KY Cav
Burgess, Almond L. 1844-1922. Co. G, 2nd Wisc Cav
Cole, Benjamin M. 1842-1896. Co. H, 21st Wisc Inf
Knaus, John Co. E, 27th MO Inf
Palmer, Emmer A Co. H, 177th Ohio Inf
Woodmancy, W. 16 Mar 1835 - 5 Dec 1905. Lieut. U.S. Soldier
JOHNSON COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORIES 1881
Gleaned from:
The History of Johnson Co., Mo. 1881
Kansas City Historical Co.

KNOB NOSTER
Baker, J. R., Dealer in Dry Goods
Baker, Mrs. S. A., Milliner
Brnton & Collins, Livery & Feed Stables
Carr, Richard, Printer
Carr, Will D., Editor, Gem
Case & Larkin, Dealers in Hardware
Cobb, C., Postmaster & Hardware Dealer
Collins & Wells, Dealers in Hardware
Cornelius, E. A., Grocer
Dawson, Charles, Dealer in Drugs
DeArman & Wells, Dealers in Dry Goods
Dennison, J. N. & Sons, Knob Noster Mills
Elbert & Carr, Grocers
Elliott, C. M., Central House
Elliott, Mrs. M. H., Proprietor Central House
Furguson, Wm. A., Dealer in Notions
Gardon, Mrs. M. E., Proprietor, City Hotel
Gem, A Weekly Paper issued on Fridays
Gilbert, L. W., Agent for McCormack Binders
Gordon, Mrs. M. E., City Hotel
Hardy, Gordon, Dealer in Dry Goods
Harris, H., Dealer in Saddles and Harness
Harris, Pres., Saloonist
Harrison, G. P., Saloonist
Huff, Dr. C. V., Dentist
Hughes, V., Blacksmith
Hull, Dr. L. D., Physician
Hutchinson, Alice, Dressmaker
Irwin, W. W., Painter
Jackson, Mrs. Mary, Toys & Notions
Johnson, Thomas, Tailor
Kelly, S. G., Attorney at Law
Kerby & McFarland, Barbers
Kinzey & Talpey, Druggists
Lewis, E. G., Photographer
Littlefield, C. B., Cashier, Bank of Knob Noster
Littlefield, C. B., Editor, Review
Lutz, Geo. W., Dealer in Furniture
Maddex, J. P., Saloonist
Maddex, Wm., Printer
Maupin, Charles, Boot & Shoe Maker
McCabe, Guy, House & Sign Painter
McCabe, Mrs. Guy, Boarding House
Mercer & Gladfelter, (Misses), Milliners
Miller, Dr. L. C., Physician
Miller, J. C., Wagon Maker
Pennington, A. O. T., R. R. Ticket Agent
Pennington, Chas., Baggage Master
Perkins, G. H., Dealer in Lumber
Pragheimer, M., Dealer in Clothing
Rhodes, W. W., Boot & Shoe Maker
Rigg, T. E., Carpenter & Builder
Rust & McVeigh, Lumber Dealers
Shockley, J. L., Blacksmith
Shultz & Wooding, Barbers
Spake, A. C., Shoemaker
Thornton, D. E. L., Dealer in Harness
Tussey & Sons, Druggists
Ward, M. D., Wagon Maker
Warren, Dr. J. H., Physician
Wells, Mrs. Sarah, Milliner
Wilson, Mrs. M. M., Milliner
Zink, T. E., Livery Stable



Los Angeles Herald, Volume 26, Number 352, 17 September 1897
A HORRIBLE OFFENSE
COMMITTED BY THREE MEN OF MISSOURI 
A Young Farmer Robbed of His Wife. The Woman Outraged and Murdered ST. LOUIS, Sept. 16—A special to the Post-Dispatch from Warrensburg, Mo., says:
News of what appears to be one of the most dastardly outrages ever committed in the state of Missouri has just reached this city. James Hull and J. N. McKeeben, two young men of Jefferson township, are under arrest charged with abduction, criminal assault and robbery. Wesley Jackson of Henry county is wanted for complicity in the crime, and the county is being scoured in search for him.
Andrew Stills, a young farmer, aged 20 years, and his wife, aged 16 years, left Warsaw Monday, where their home had been, to drive over to Knob Noster, where his wife's sister resides. On the way the horse died and Stills was at a loss how to proceed until the three young men, Hull, McKibben and Jackson, offered to permit Stills to hitch his carl behind their buggy and drive the couple to their destination for $1. The bargain was made, and after getting out into the country Stills claims the trio seized his wife and drove away with her, after robbing him of what money he had, something over $5. The whole country around here Is aroused and searching for the lost wife, who is thought lo have been outraged and murdered. The three young men were said to have been under the influence of liquor. Stills searched for his wife until exhausted, but could find no trace of her. Farmers whom he importuned for assistance did not believe his story and would not join him in the search. At last several became convinced there was truth in it; the two arrests followed and now lynching is strongly talked of.
New York Times
Knob Noster Journal; Bomber Means Boom for Base Town
By WILLIAM ROBBINS, Special to the New York Times
Published: December 07, 1988
There's gold, legend has it, buried in one of those round-topped hills above this small Midwestern town with the curious name, and several people have spent a lot of time looking for it.



But the only lucky strike here so far has been the one that brought Knob Noster an air base. The Whiteman Air Force Base, only a mile or so from the city limits, accounts for more than two-thirds of its economic activity. Now, if the city leaders' hopes pan out, the base will set off a new rush of development. It is the only base to be named so far for the first of the nation's projected fleet of 132 Stealth bombers. The move is expected to bring in 8,100 more Air Force personnel and dependents, who, along with more than 1,000 people in new civilian jobs, are expected to more than double the population of the base and the community. Many people here say they hope all that can be achieved without changing the quiet nature of the town about 70 miles east of Kansas City that has made it a favored retirement home both for townspeople and for airmen. In a place where the only restaurant is a coffee shop that closes at 2:30 every afternoon, hopes for development center on things like an all-day, fast-food restaurant. Gregory Bynum, executive vice president of the Bank of Knob Noster, says development might also bring a doctor, perhaps a pharmacy and maybe even a department store or a jeweler. And to get ready for it all, the town is already moving ahead with planning and preparations. It is putting $100,000 a year into public improvements, including doubling the capacity of a water system that nearly failed in last summer's drought. ''I really think we've got a great opportunity for growth here,'' said Betty Hall, publisher of The Knob Noster Item, a 30-year-old weekly newspaper, voicing a sentiment that was widely shared as she sipped coffee at the downtown Office Cafe. ''I think most people don't realize what this is going to mean for Knob Noster.''


The town had dwindled from 2,000 in the 19th century to a dusty village of a few hundred people in 1942 when the Army Air Corps placed a glider training base here. The Government immediately offended local pride by naming the new post the Sedalia Army Air Base, for a much larger town about 18 miles to the east. A lot of subsequent growth went to Sedalia and to Warrensburg, about nine miles to the west. Now, 46 years later, after conversion to a bomber base and the later addition of a site for 150 Minuteman missiles, Knob Noster has a little more than 2,000 people. About 2,000 more live on the outskirts, and the base population is about 4,000. Besides the bank and cafe, the town has a grain elevator, two barbershops, two hardware stores and a few other businesses, including a new motel on U.S. Route 50 on a tract recently annexed by the city. 
The Old Bell Towers Motel, Highway 50, Knob Noster, MO
A city hall, a police station, schools and a lot of neatly kept homes complete the cityscape. It is a town where relationships seem easy, where Mrs. Hall smiled tolerantly at one of the standard jokes of Bob Carr, a businessman, alderman, former city clerk and town humorist. (The Item is a try-weekly he says, adding, ''They try weekly to put out a newspaper.'') And conversations sometimes bring the legend that gold was buried north of town by pioneers in a wagon train who were massacred there in 1819. It is buried, some say, on ''our knob,'' Knob Noster. Others suspect the name is a corrupted version of some old Indian word. In the cafe, at the busiest corner, an intersection with four stop signs, the owner, Dean Gray, was recalling what kept him here after he retired as an Air Force master sergeant. ''You come here and you think, 'What a dump they brought me to!', he said. ''But before long you start to feel like it's home.'' There are, of course, some natural concerns, among them those of David A. Yount, a retired colonel. ''It's going to overload the medical facilities at the base,'' he said. ''I'm afraid I'm going to be standing in line.'' ''I hear all sides,'' said Mayor Maurice Krause, a meat-cutter at the air base. ''Some people want to see us stay quiet and small,'' Mayor Krause said, ''I'm excited. My position is we're going to grow, and we can control it and see that it happens in the best way possible.''

The optimism generally drowns out the concerns. ''Well, I just might build some more,'' said A. F. Quattlebaum, another retired master sergeant, who owns 39 units of rental housing. And Mr. Gray said there was nothing forcing him to close the Office Cafe in the afternoon. ''If the money's coming in, I'll be here,'' he said.

One of two women qualified to fly the B-2 stealth bomber talks about flying the $1.3 billion plane at Whiteman Air Force near Knob Noster, Mo.

The 31-year-old is being identified only by her radio name, Iron Butterfly, because of security concerns.



Articles about the Canida family from the Knob Noster, Johnson County, Missouri newspaper. ****************************************************************** File contributed for use in the USGenWeb Archives by: Audie Canida <audiec@swbell.net> USGENWEB NOTICE: In keeping with our policy of providing free information on the Internet, material may be freely used by non-commercial entities, as long as this message remains on all copied material, AND permission is obtained from the contributor of the file. These electronic pages may NOT be reproduced in any format for profit or presentation by other organizations. Persons or organizations desiring to use this material for non-commercial purposes, MUST obtain the written consent of the contributor, OR the legal representative of the submitter, and contact the listed USGenWeb archivist with proof of this consent. ******************************************************************* From the Knob Noster Gem, Knob Noster, Missouri, Friday, November 21, 1902: Killed Himself Henry Canady who owned and lived upon 40 acres of land seven miles north of this city, committed suicide last Saturday morning by shooting himself with a shotgun. He was 72 years of age. Saturday morning he took the gun and started hunting. About 300 yards from the house he sat upon a knoll, first getting horse-weed with which to push the gun trigger, he deliberately planted the gun at his heart and pushed the trigger with a branch of the weed. The branch broke off and he then placed the end of the weed against the trigger and the full load was discharged into his breast, killing him instantly. Coroner Bills was notified and came down on the afternoon train. He did not think it necessary to impanel a jury, but took the testimony of some of the family, which showed also that it was not the old man's first attempt. From the Knob Noster Gem, March 1918 - Walter A. Canida died at his home north of Knob Noster March 13, 1918 of TB. He leaves 2 children and other relatives. He was buried at Hocker Cemetery. His wife died about a year ago. From the Knob Noster Gem, January 2, 1920 - Edith Canida daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Burl Canida passed away Friday night after a long illness. She was 16 years of age. Funeral services conducted by Bro. West at the home Monday at 2 o'clock. She was buried in Hocker Cemetery. From the Knob Noster Gem, January 3, 1924 - Clifford Canida of Oklahoma City left for his home Tuesday after spending 3 weeks with his uncle J. B. Canida who resides south of town. From the Knob Noster Gem, September 18, 1930 - Sunday dinner guest of Herman Canida were Mr. J.B. Canida, Rachel, Goldie, Clyde, Marie, Jesse, and Ethel Canida, Fred Shornhorst, and Harold Clark. From the Knob Noster Gem, May 9, 1935 - A marriage license was issued in Sedalia Saturday to Jack Bell of Middlesboro, Kentucky and Miss Rachael Canida of Knob Noster. The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Burl Canida of near Valley City. She has spent most of her life in this community. It is reported that the young couple will go to Kentucky to make their home. From the Knob Noster Gem, April 16, 1936 - Mrs. Herman Canida of Valley City wife of a park laborer gave birth to triplet boys Easter Sunday that aggregated 20 1/2 pounds. Wilbur Claude weighed 7 3/4 pounds, Winford Carol hit 7 pounds and Wilford Carl weighed 5 3/4 pounds. Mr. and Mrs. Canida have 2 other children living and 1 dead. All were single births. The mother and children are reported in good condition. Dr. Grove attending physician is still suffering from shock. Francis Harfield is reported consumed with envy. He is the recent father of twins. From the Knob Noster Gem, July 1936, - Burl Canida celebrated his 53rd birthday at his home Friday present besides his family were 2 nephews Raymond Gordon and William Henry Canida of Sultanta, California, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Reynolds, Mrs. Jessie Norris and children, Mr. and Mrs. Orville Canida and baby of Marshall, and Mr. and Mrs. Otis Saylor from Sweet Springs. From the Knob Noster Gem, August 1948 - Mrs. Rosetta Hensley 82 years old widow of John Thomas Hensley died August 16, 1948 at the home of her son Artie Hensley south west of Knob Noster near Burtville. She was a daughter of Ellie and Jane Anderson and was born April 20, 1866. She married Mr. Hensley in December 1882. They were the parents of 9 children, 1 daughter Mrs. Burl Canida preceded her in death 4 years ago. Hr. Hensley died 12 years ago. She lived in Pettis and Johnson Counties for 21 years. She is survived by 4 sons Dorsey and Jake Hensley of Ft. Worth, Texas, and Artie Hensley of the home, 4 daughters Mrs. Mary Kennedy of Bakersfield, California, Mrs. Lillie Canida of Veronia, Oregon, Mrs. Naydean Matthews of Augusta, Kansas, and Mrs. Marie Harrington of Kansas City, also 59 grandchildren, 58 great grandchildren, 2 sisters Mrs., Mindie Cravens of Sacramento, California, and Mrs. Kizzie Smith of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, and a brother Cornelius Anderson of Winslow, Arkansas. The funeral was held at the Knob Noster Baptist church with burial in the Knob Noster Cemetery. From the Knob Noster Gem, March 1991 - Albert Green, 83, Warsaw, formerly of Warrensburg, died Tuesday, March 19, 1991, at the Golden Valley Memorial Hospital, Clinton. He was born September 16, 1902 in Bushong, Kansas, the son of William Robert and Clara Stewart Green. He was reared in Colorado and moved to Warrensburg as a young man. He was police chief in Warrensburg from 1954 until his retirement in 1971, when he moved to Warsaw. He had been a resident of the Warsaw Health Care Center for the past 15 months. He was married to Marie Bradshaw on September 21, 1929, and she died in 1934. He married Goldie L. Canida on May 22, 1937, and she preceded him in death in 1979. On August 14, 1980, he married Alene M. Shoemaker. She survives. Survivors in addition to his wife, Alene, Warsaw, are three daughters, Ruth Taylor, Stover, Mrs. Alberta Jones, Warrensburg, and Lois Walker, Warsaw; two sons, Eugene Green, Kansas City, and Robert Green, Greenwood; three brothers, Ernest Green, Chilhowee, Ellis Green, Lordsburg, New Mexico, and Bill Green Warrensburg; two sisters, Effie McGuire, Roswell, New Mexico, and Minnie Syme, Centerview; eight grand- children and 10 great grandchildren. Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. Friday, March 22, at the Reser Funeral Home, Warsaw. Burial will be in the Hocker Cemetery near Knob Noster. Pallbearers will be Gene Burden, Richard Earl Stewart, Roger Walker, Larry Bybee, Wilbur See, and Gary Jones. The family will receive friends from 7 to 8:30 p.m. tonight at the Reser Funeral Chapel.



THE JOHNSON COUNTY CASES. Tho little town of Knob Noster, near the Eastern line of Johnson county, and on the (prospective) Pacific Railroad, had been, until Price's army went through it, a flourishing place. It has been robbed by the guerrillas four times since 1862, and when, in the spring of 1863, the last company of Militia left the town, and bushwhacker hordes, belonging to Quantrill's command, were swarming everywhere around it, the citizens applied to tho military authorities for protection. The military Posts at Warrensburg, Lexington, and Sedalia, were too weak in themselves to be able to detach a portion of their forces for the protection of Knob Noster. The commanders at these posts advised the citizens of Knob Noster to arm and defend themselves. The citizens did so; kept pickets and guards every night, and were in constant communication with the military authorities, by whom they were supplied with ammunition, and, perhaps, even with arms. Several other such independent companies were organized in different parts of tho county for mutual protection; and that the insecurity to life and property demanded such measures will be granted by every one, when learning that the Captain of one of these companies and several of his neighbors were shot dead by bushwhackers whilst plowing corn, which they had to do in company for safety's sake. Tho company at Knob Noster elected an old, warm hearted, Western farmer, John Maddox, as Captain, Early in the war he had been in the Home Guards, defending Lexington against Price's rebels, Although illiterate, he is a man of means, and warmly devoted to the Union cause. In August, 1863, a returned soldier was killed in broad daylight, quite near the town of Knob Noster. This occurrence aroused the indignation of the Union men, and part of Capt. Maddox's company went out scouting after bushwhackers. Several of these pests were killed about that time, occasional scouts being made by small mounted volunteer or State Militia forces, generally guided or accompanied by Maddox's men. General Schofield's Order No. 86, of August 25, 1863, seemed to authorize such laudable action, even if self-defence and self-protection should not alone justify it. Humanity demands of every citizen active and earnest co-operation with the military authorities, in putting down these common enemies of mankind. The Commanding General demands of every citizen the full discharge of his duty in this regard. To enable them to protect themselves from violence, and to aid the troops, when necessary, all loyal and peaceable citizens in Missouri will be permitted to bear arms. Notwithstanding all this, John Maddox, with over thirty of his neighbors, were arrested by order of General E. B. Brown, commanding the Central District of Missouri, confined in the prison at Jefferson City, in company with rebels and bushwhackers, and tried by a military commission, appointed by the General mentioned.
 
On Feb. 26, 2017, B. Edward “Bob” Carr, 92, of Knob Noster, passed away at the Missouri Veteran’s
B. Edward "Bob" Carr, Knob Noster
Former Mayor
Home in Warrensburg. He was born the son of Walter James and Alice Francis (Koch) Carr on May 14, 1924, in Knob Noster, Bob grew up in Knob Noster, graduating from high school in the spring of 1942. He enrolled in the University of Missouri where he participated in ROTC. He later joined the United States Navy in 1943 and was commissioned as a United States naval aviator. As part of his naval aviation preflight training, he spent time at William Jewell College, the University of Kansas and the University of Iowa. He returned to Warrensburg and re-enrolled at Central Missouri State. He played basketball at CMSU for Coach Tom Scott and later Earl Keth. While in preflight training for the Navy, he also played basketball at the University of Kansas for Coach Phog Allen. After leaving the Navy, he returned to Knob Noster to work with his father and became part owner of the Knob Noster Grain Elevator, Knob Noster Locker Plant and began his appliance business, Knob Noster Radio and TV.
Carr, a longtime civil servant, served in a variety of positions in the Knob Noster community including volunteer fireman, followed his father as city clerk of Knob Noster, city alderman and eventually became mayor of the community. He also was member of the Knob Noster Lion’s Club, Chamber of Commerce and Whiteman Air Force Base Community Council. He was recognized for his service to the community and received several awards including Lion of the Year, Chamber of Commerce Outstanding Citizen of the Year and Whiteman Air Force Base Community Council Leader of the Year.
In 1948 he married June Ann Frame in Kansas City. She preceded him in death on Oct. 30, 2001. He married Jean Crosby in Knob Noster, on April 5, 2003. She also preceded him in death. In addition, he was preceded in death by his parents; his brother, Dr. Walter James Carr Jr.; and his sister, Jean Carr Conboy.
He is survived by his four children, Jim Bob Carr of Overland Park, Kan., Julie Ogletree (Buddy) of Nixa, Jane Hughes (Tom) of Knob Noster and John Carr (Brenda) of Oak Grove; three nieces, Cindy Bennett, Kansas City, Cathy Egan (Pat), Kansas City, and Carol Groebe (David), Overland Park, Kan.; seven grandchildren, Cliff Everts, Salena Corbett, Brad Hughes, Brian Hughes, Kristi Carr, Katie Carr and Nick Depasquale; eight great-grandchildren and several great-nieces and nephews.
Funeral services will be held at 2:30 p.m, on Wednesday, March 1, at Sweeney-Phillips & Holdren Funeral Home, with Brother Charles Brant officiating. Interment will follow in Knob Noster Cemetery with full military honors. Pallbearers will be Cliff Everts, Brad Hughes, Brian Hughes, Jay Jordan, Casey Cunningham, Clint Corbett, Frank Webber and Todd Brown. The family will receive friends from 6to 8 p.m, on Tuesday at the funeral home.

Raymond E. Bass
Raymond E. Bass, Former Mayor
of Knob Noster
On Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2016, Raymond Eugene “Ray” Bass, Sr., 89, of Knob Noster, was greeted at Heaven’s gates by his loving parents, Louis “LB” and Geneva Bass, two brothers, Harold and Dean, and one son, Finis. He was surrounded and supported by his loving family and caregivers during the last days of his life.
He was born in Knob Noster on Sept. 5, 1927, the son of Louis B. and Geneva (Calvert) Bass.
In 1946 Raymond joined the U.S. Army where he proudly served for 20 years. He retired as a sergeant first-class. After he retired, he returned to his home of Knob Noster where he owned and operated multiple successful businesses for many years (Bass Trucking Company and Mr. B’s Convenient Store). He spent many years as a public servant in the capacities of city councilman, alderman, mayor pro tem, and mayor.
In August 1966 he married the love of his life, Idella “Del” Dickinson. To this union two of his children, Eric and Tonya, were born. They were married for 50 wonderful years. He was an amazing husband, father and friend who volunteered his time to “many” sports teams as a wonderful coach and mentor.
Raymond leaves many to cherish his wonderful memories: his wife, Idella Bass; three sons, Ray Bass, Jr. (Vicki) of Brown Deer, Wis., Keith Bass of Higginsville and Eric Bass (Christi) of San Antonio, Texas; two daughters, Melanie Carr (Deoral) of Enid, Okla., and Tonya Gresham (Bryant) of Kansas City; four sisters: Juanita Benton of Higginsville, Betty Benton (Travis) of Higginsville, Mary Steward of Knob Noster, Janet “Sue” Winters (Elbert) of Knob Noster; three brothers, Joseph Bass, Lawerence “Sonny” Bass (Dorothy) both of Warrensburg, Wayne Bass (Marie) of Odessa; 11 grandchildren; 11 great-grandchildren; and a host of nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends.

Sidney Neal Davis, 89, died Monday, March 20, 2017, in Mesa, Arizona,

of pulmonary fibrosis.
The only son of Perry L. and Helen W. (Wimer) Davis, Sidney, was born April 25, 1927, in Knob Noster. He graduated Knob Noster High School in the class of 1945. Sidney attended Central Missouri State Teachers College, graduating in May 1950, with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a major in accounting. Sid served twice in the U.S. Navy, from 1945 and 1954. In between, he worked at Arthur Young and Co., Kansas City. Sid was the owner of Knob Noster Oil Co. with Bob Overby and had a second career selling advertising with Appreciated Advertising of Kansas City and Blue Sky Specialties, Warrensburg, owned by his stepdaughter, C. Jeannie Everly, who preceded him in death.
He was a member of Knob Noster VFW Post 4195, Knob Noster First Christian Church, and active in the Johnson County Missouri Democratic Party. Until the time of his death, Worshipful Brother Sidney N. Davis was the oldest living Past Master of Knob Noster Lodge No. 245, Knob Noster, having served in that capacity in 1960 and 1964. He first joined the Lodge on Jan. 3, 1949, and received his 50-Year membership pin on Jan. 3, 1999. Sid loved the Lodge. Sid married I. Ruth (DeJarnette) Rimel on Nov. 2, 1974. She survives at the home. He is also survived by stepdaughters Linda K. Gregory and James W. Spitz of Mesa, Arizona, and Tammie S. Clippert of Sedalia; a stepson, Michael D. Rimel and Kim of Sedalia, and son-in-law, Robert A. Everly of Warrensburg; grandchildren, James J. Gregory of Eldon, Ryan M. Rimel of Odessa, Robert A. Everly II and Cassandra Whitaker, Chelsea L Orman and Brandon of Warrensburg, and McKenna E. Clippert of Sedalia; and many great-grandchildren.

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