WHS Class of 73

Search This Blog

July 10, 2016

Holden, Missouri, Madison Township, Old Pictures, History - Photographs

ca. 1910 Holden, Missouri 2nd Street
Link to Holden's Tennessee Rats Baseball Team












Gollady Motor Mo.  Chevrolet, Holden, Missouri
Gollady Motor Company, Holden, MO
Dan Robertson, E. Fish, Luther Thompson, Elmer Tobin



Holden Missouri Race Track, SE Side of Holden













Buck & Colvitt,  Holden MO
“James Russell Andruss was born near Holden, Missouri in 1857. Around 1886 he purchased a livery stable from President Harry S. Truman's father in Lamar, Barton Co. Missouri. It was  known as the Truman & Andruss Livery for a while.”  Further research revealed that the Truman & Andruss Livery eventually became known as the Whitsett & Andruss Livery. Now the plot thickens…President Harry S. Truman was James J. “Jim Crow” Chiles’ nephew, and Jim Crow Chiles was one of Quantrill’s guerrillas. Joanne Chiles Eakin, co-author of Branded as Rebels, is also related to him. G. P. Whitsett had cousins who rode with Quantrill and may have also rode with Quantrill himself. At the very least the Andruss’ were related to Jesse James through the Courtney’s. Jesse James also rode with Quantrill during the Civil War".....Link to Andruss Jesse James in Holden

Dr. & Mrs. Edward Andruss, Holden, Missouri


Biographical Sketch of Dr. Edward Andruss, Holden, Johnson County, Missouri >From "History of Johnson County, Missouri," by Ewing Cockrell, Historical Publishing Company, Topeka, Cleveland, 1918. ********************************************************************** Dr. Edward Andruss, physician and surgeon, Holden, Missouri, is a striking example of success attained in the most beneficent of pro- fessions. As a surgeon and practitioner of the homeopathic school he has achieved a success second to none in western Missouri and the uniformity of his continued success in the treatment of diseases has been instrumental in enlightening the people on the principles and practices of the school of medicine founded by Hahnemann. For the past 20 years, Dr. Andruss has been ministering to the sick in Holden and vicinity and has not only won for himself an enviable and disting uished place among his professional co-laborers but has endeared him- self in the hearts of his many patients as a kind, capable, and a learned practitioner. Dr. Andruss asw born in Warrensburg, Missouri, October 1, 1863, a son of Orville Rice and Wealthy Jane (Cox) Andruss, both of whom were natives of Tennessee. Orville Rice Andruss settled in Johnson county, Missouri in 1849 and was previously engaged in farm work in Lafayette county. He finally made a permanent settlement in Centerview township, this county, where he purchased a tract of land and was engaged in farming and stock raising until his death, September 28, 1897. Mr. Andruss was a veteran of the Civil War, having served in the Union army with the Missouri state militia, and participated in several engagements among them being the battles of Little Blue, Georgetown and Mine Creek. He was always found at his post and he attended to all military duties assigned him in a soldier like manner and like a true patriot. He was a lifelong member of the Pres- byterian Church and a highly respected and influential member of society. His wife removed with her parents to Missouri in 1847. She spent her last days with her son at Holden, Missouri and died at his home, July 6, 1900. Dr. Andruss was reared on the farm and obtained his primary education in the district school of his neighborhood. Sub- sequently, he pursued a course in the Warrensburg State Normal School, after which he entered Gem City Business College at Quincy, Illinois, graduating from the latter institution in February, 1892. He was then tendered the position of assistant teacher in the book keeping department of the college and filled this position until he resigned to return home, April 1, 1892. After a careful preparatory course, preliminary to entering medical college, he entered the Kansas City Homeopathic Medical College, which conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Medicine, March 25, 1897. During his course in college, the young physician's merits were readily recognized and he was chosen assistant house surgeon. After capably filling this position for six months, he was chosen house surgeon and filled this position one year. He then came to Holden, where he opened an office and has continued in the practice of his profession with ever increasing and remunerative succ- ess. Dr. Andrus is the only representative of his school in Holden and has ably demonstrated that he is a pronounced credit to his profession. Dr. Andruss pursued a general post graduate course in New York in 1903 and a special post-graduate course in operative surgery in Chicago in 1908. Dr. Andruss was married, January 30, 1895 to Florence May Alli- son and to this marriage have been born the following children: Edward Allison and Oakley Bluhm, twins, born June 8, 1897, Edward being a descendant of patriotic ancestors imbued with a love of country, when war was declared with Germany readily volunteered his services in be- half of the Nation and enlisted with Red Cross Ambulance Corps, Number 24, under Capt. Ernest A. Cayeness, now Red Cross Ambulance Company, Number 355, Sanitary Train, Number 314, Medical Reserve Corps; Oakley Bluhm, departed this life, April 23, 1904; and Annie Onota, born Janu- ary 22, 1900, a student of the State Normal School at Warrensburg, entering on her course for a ninety-hour diploma. Florence May (Alli- son) Andruss was born and reared on a farm near Knob Noster, Missouri, and is a daughter of Oscar L. Allison of Knob Noster, a native of Vir- ginia and a Union veteran. Mrs. Andruss was educated in the State Normal School at Warrensburg and for 10 years was engaged in teaching in the public schools of Johnson county and at Harlem, Clay county, Mo. Dr. and Mrs. Andruss have a very pleasant home in Holden and enjoy the associations of a large circle of friends. In addition to his practice, Dr. Andruss finds time to supervise the work on his farm in Centerview township. Dr. Andruss is professionally identified with the Missouri Institute of Homeopathy, of which organization he has served 2 years as vice-president. He has served one term as local registrar of vital statistics. He is fraternally affiliated with the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Modern Wood- men of America, and the Order of the Eastern Star. Dr. and Mrs. Andruss and their children are members of the Presbyterian church, of which he is a ruling elder. A stanch republican in politics, he was a candidate of his party for coroner of Johnson county in 1900, and though defeated for election, he headed his ticket by a large vote. Dr. Andruss not only keeps abreast of the latest developments in the science of his profession but is progressive in his tendencies and views and is ever to be found in the forefront of matters which concern the welfare of his city, his county, and his nation. ==================================================================== USGENWEB NOTICE: In keeping with our policy of providing free information on the Internet, data may be used by non-commercial entities, as long as this message remains on all copied material. These electronic pages may NOT be reproduced in any format for profit or for presentation by other persons or organizations. Persons or organizations desiring to use this material for purposes other than stated above must obtain the written consent of the file contributor. This file was contributed for use in the USGenWeb Archives by: <> Penny Harrell <Incog3678@aol.com>

Born in Missouri, USA on 12 September 1857 to Orville Rice Andruss and Wealthy Jane Cox. James Russell marriedSusanna Stout and had a child. James Russell married Laura Wright and had 4 children. He passed away on 23 April 1942 in Allen, Kansas, USA.

Description: Drowned in the Night.

Date: July 20 1875

Newspaper published in: St. Louis, Mo.

Holden, Mo., July 19. 

Mr. James GUYON and Mrs. SLOAN, aged about 16 years, were drowned in Brush Creek, four and a half miles from this place. They had been to Warrensburg and were returning at 1 o'clock, p.m. Saturday night, when they mistook the crossing and striking a perpendicular ledge of rocks, capsized their buggy, and it is supposed, were drowned immediately. The lady was found one fourth of a mile east of the crossing this morning, and Mr. GUYON abut one hundred yards below her. They were both in a nude condition. The rain storm was terrible here, the creeks being as high as at any time during the summer.

James Russell Andruss

James R. (Jim) Andruss was born near Holden, MO in 1857. He had light brown hair and blue eyes.
Jim bought a livery stable from Harry Truman's father in Lamar, Barton Co. MO-- "Truman Witsett Livery Stable"--about 1886.
Shortly after, he married Laura Wright in 1887 in Prairie Hall Presbyterian Church in Lamar MO. (The church was made of old field stone with a dirt floor.) Laura had dark hair and blue eyes.
His father, Orville Andruss, gave all of his children land when they married. One girl married a man not a farmer--he gave her equal money instead.
Jim and his brother, George, were each given adjoining qtr. sections of land in Allen Co. KS. Each, in turn, bought an additional qtr. section making nice-sized farms. They were located 12 miles from Humboldt, 10 miles from Moran, 7 1/2 miles from Elsmore and 9 miles from LaHarpe.
Laura Wright Andruss died when baby Laura was two years old. For a time Jim left his children at George's farm, and Anna Belle looked after them and helped raise them. They went home at night to sleep. The two families were like one for a while.
-Merriam Morrison Kokojan, 1983 Orville Rice Andruss Family History

Holden Connections...

David Nation and Carrie Nation
Holden, Missouri Residents

Carrie Amelia Moore Nation (first name also spelled Carry; November 25, 1846 – June 9, 1911) was an American woman who was a radical member of the temperance movement, which opposed alcohol before the advent of Prohibition. She is particularly noteworthy for promoting her viewpoint through vandalism. Nation frequently attacked the property of alcohol-serving establishments (most often taverns) with a hatchet.
Nation was a relatively large woman, almost 6 feet (180 cm) tall and weighing 175 pounds (79 kg), with a stern countenance. She described herself as "a bulldog running along at the feet of Jesus, barking at what He doesn't like", and claimed a divine ordination to promote temperance by destroying bars.
The spelling of her first name is ambiguous, and both Carrie and Carry are considered correct. Official records sayCarrie, which Nation used most of her life; the name Carry was used by her father in the family Bible. Upon beginning her campaign against liquor in the early 20th century, she adopted the name Carry A. Nation, saying it meant "Carry A Nation for Prohibition".

First Marriage

Carrie met Charles Gloyd when he was a boarder in the family's home in Missouri. Gloyd was a Union veteran, originally from Ohio, and was a doctor. Her parents apparently also knew that he had trouble with drinking, and tried to prevent the marriage. But Carrie, who said later that she did not realize his drinking problem at the time, married him anyway, on November 21, 1867. They moved to Holden, Missouri. Carrie was soon pregnant, and also realized the extent of her husband's drinking problem. Her parents forced her to return to their home, and Carrie's daughter, Charlien, was born on September 27, 1868. Charlien had multiple serious physical and mental disabilities, which Carrie blamed on her husband's drinking.
Charles Gloyd died in 1869, and Carrie went back to Holden to live with her mother-in-law and daughter, building a small home with funds from her husband's estate and with some money from her father. In 1872, she got a teaching certificate from Normal Institute in Warrensberg, Missouri. She began teaching at a primary school to support her family, but soon left teaching after a conflict with a member of the school board.

Hooks Cotter Stats


Hooks Cotter was born on Tuesday, May 22, 1900, in Holden, Missouri. Cotter was 21 years old when he broke into the big leagues on April 15, 1922, with the Chicago Cubs.


George Gillpatrick

George Gillpatrick was born on Sunday, February 28, 1875, in Holden, Missouri. Gillpatrick was 23 years old when he broke into the big leagues on May 22, 1898, with the St. Louis Browns.
George GillpatrickHolden, Missouri1875-02-2818981898
1898 Plat Map Holden, Missouri
1898 Map Link Holden, Missouri
The Emporia weekly news. (Emporia, Kan.) October 20, 1887
SENSATIONAL MURDER.
Holden, Mo., Oct. 14. The most horrible and startling secret murder ever enacted in this county was brought to light here yesterday afternoon. Mrs. Annie Marshall, cousin of Fredrick A. Tesch, proprietor of the Holden feed yards, died very suddenly and mysteriously last night at Tesch's residence, on West Fourth Street. The deceased, having been deserted by her husband, has for several years been doing housework for Tesch, and has been compelled to do the hardest drudgery, and has been cruelly and inhumanly treated as well. Today preparations were made by the family for burial at 3 o’clock this afternoon, at the family residence. The funeral sermon was preached by Rev. William T. Russell, of the Baptist Church, of which the deceased was a member.
In the meantime. Mayor John H. Hewes had been advised by Marshal Still and others that foul play had caused her sudden death, and at the conclusion of the funeral services, as the corpse was being borne to the hearse, the Mayor called a halt and demanded an examination and inquest. Drs. T. F. Murray, U. L. Bolton and E. L. Carter were called to make the examination, and with the most appalling results. They found that her skull was fractured and deeply gashed in a dozen places, producing concussion of the brain. Her limbs and entire body were literally bruised and scarred all over. She had received a blow on the lower back sufficient, to produce death, breaking the spinous processes of the spinal column. Her body was mangled and mutilated beyond description. Tesch and wife and son, Harry, are under arrest, and strongly guarded to prevent violence, of which there was rumor. A course of systematic brutality and cruel treatment seems to have been practiced upon her all summer, and the same has repeatedly been observed by the neighbors and reported by a colored washer man. The whole community is wild with excitement and indignation, The Coroner’s inquest was held this morning at the Mayor's office.

Held for Murder.
Holden. Mo , Oct 30 The coroner's jury returned a verdict this evening at 5 o'clock in the Tesch Marshall murder case, holding Sarah E Tesch as the principal and Fred. A. Tesch, her husband, as accessory before the fact. The testimony was all taken with closed doors and the people were not fully aware of its horrifying details, and when the facts became known they were found so much more revolting than anticipated that they created the most intense indignation. The prisoners were brought up from jail this evening to appear at the preliminary trial in the morning. Their attorney will then file an affidavit asking for a change of venue on account of the prejudice alleged to exist here against them. Frank S Tesch, the brother of the murdered Annie Marshal), arrived here last night from Denver. He is in the wholesale grocery business and is a very intelligent gentleman. He was not notified of his slater's death. He said she was as intelligent a woman as her murderess and he was Indignant at the statement made by the Tesch family that she was a half-witted girl. "There is some hidden mystery," said the brother, "about sister's death a motive back of all this brutality that the testimony does not solve. I believe it will come out yet and then all will be plain." The young man produced letters before the jury written by Mrs. Tesch, speaking highly of Annie's companionship to her, and of how contented the girl was and of the new dresses she bad presented to her. The woman also wrote that she hoped Annie's father and brother would not want her to go and live with them as she could not spare her. There were a number of letters of the same purport. The last letter written him by the dead girl was dated in the last part of last year and it intimated nothing wrong in the family relations. The brother now believes it was written at the dictation of Mrs. Tesch. When the brother read the testimony of one witness to the effect that he had seen the poor girl eating something out of the slop bucket which she was carrying to the hogs, his grief was pitiful.









Auditorium and Sales Pavilion, Holden, Mo Erected 1922
Old High School, Holden, MO







Holden, Missouri Murder (s) 1934
Holden, Missouri Veterans Parade about 1910







Holden, Missouri, 2nd Street, around 1910

Public School, Holden, MO about 1895












Dr. Henry J. Hallar, Holden Missouri postcard to Mrs. Holiday Hallar, mentions Jack, Sarah, Lilly

Front side of Dr. Henry Hallar postcard, Holden, MO



Holden, Missouri Baptist Church about 1895
Pumping station Holden, Missouri
MISSOURI BANDITS  - Los Angeles Herald
 Kill a Detective and Then Make Their Escape
Holden, Missouri Jan. 29.—John Jackson, a detective for tho Missouri, Kansas and Texas railroad from Sedalla was shot through the head by an unknown man here early this morning. Yesterday Superintendent D. Hardy, from the Missouri Pacific, learned that an attempt would be made to rob the express car on the east-bound Missouri Pacific train No. 8, due here at 3:08 a.m. for St. Louis. A posse was organized in Sedalia, and left here on a special train at 8:30 o'clock last night for Warrensburg, where the sheriff and special officers were taken aboard. When the train reached Holden the officers were informed that the suspected men were at a resort and it was decided to arrest them. The marshal of the town and Jackson started to make the arrest, saying they did not need any assistance. Jackson entered the house. One of the men fired and a bullet passed through Jackson's head Just over the right eye. The officer returned the bandit's shot, but he and his companions, of whom there were about six, escaped. Later, one of them, badly wounded, was captured. Jackson cannot recover. The arrested robber said his name was Shores and confessed numerous robberies, lie admitted having held up the Missouri Pacific agent at Independence, a few nights ago, and of having robbed tho Pittsfield, MIssouri post office last Friday night. It is believed that Shores and the man who shot Jackson and escaped, held up a Missouri Pacific Passenger trains west of Kansas City Jan. 9, robbing the sleeping car passengers. Blood hounds have been sent for to track the escaped robbers. The proprietors of the resort where the men were corralled have been arrested for harboring the robbers. It develops that a woman told the plan to rob the train to officials at Sedalia. Her identity is not known. The plan was for two men to board either train No. 8 or No. 10, eastbound, at Holden and ride to Centervlew, eight miles east, where the engine was to be detached, after which the robbers were to hold up the express messenger and passengers. In the house where the men were discovered was found a watch taken from the telegraph operator at Independence, Missouri by robbers who held him up In the Missouri Pacific station a few nights ago.

Holden, Missouri M. K. & T. Depot


The second railroad to be built in Johnson county was constructed 
under the name of the St. Louis & Santa Fe railroad. This road runs 
from Holden southwest through parts of Madison, Kingsville and Rose 
Hill townships, and through Harrisonville to Paola, Kansas. This 
road was built in 1870 and for a number of years was operated by 
the Missouri Pacific and is now a part of the M. K. & T.



 M. K & T. Train Depot Holden, Missouri Kansas and Texas
Kansas City journal. (Kansas City, Mo.), 07 Sept. 1899
2nd Annual Farm Product and livestock show Holden, Missouri about 1890?
Ben Scott?  Holden, Missouri
Jaimie Carpenter in Holden Missouri by E.P. Tompkins 1880's CDV ID'd
Lewis Corson in Holden Missouri by E.P. Tompkins Circa 1870's CDV ID'd



George Cast, Holden, Missouri
Railroad Map, Holden, Missouri

Historic Map - Holden, MO - 1869


Bird's eye view of Holden, Johnson Co., Missouri 1869. 
Reproduction map of the community known as Holden, MO, drawn by Prussian born Albert Ruger. 
Ruger emigrated to America where he first worked as a mason. He served with the Ohio 
Volunteers during the Civil War, where he began to draw views of Union camps. Following the war, 
Ruger began his panoramic mapping career in Battle Creek, Michigan. and sketched communities 
in twenty-two states.  Holden is a small city that even today is just 2.4 square miles. Holden lies to 
the east of Tornado Alley, and is located where the warm moist air from the gulf meets the cold 
dry air with the Jet Stream. It is 34 miles southeast of Independence, MO. The map features clearly 
labeled street names with lively scenes of carriage and pedestrian traffic.

1943 Pilots at Guadalcanal with Squadron F4U Corsair:
2nd row: 1stLt S. T. Synar, Muskogee, OK; 1stLt H. A. Olsson Jr., Phoenix, AZ; 
1st Lt J. D. Noble, Holden Missouri
http://marines.centreconnect.org/vmf112/squadron_f4u.html 



Place name:
Vitae Springs
Description:A sulphur springs about six miles southeast of Holden, named by the three daughters of W.W. Hall, who wanted to make a health resort out of it. Apparently they had in mind the genitive case of the Latin word "vita" (life), so that the name could be interpreted as "Springs of Life." (Ed. Little)
Source:Johnson, Bernice E. "Place Names In Six Of The West Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

Place name:St. Celia Seminary (earlier Holden College)
Description:This name which replaced Holden College (q.v.) was adopted when the school was purchased by an order of Catholic nuns for which it was named in 1895. No longer in existence. (O.G. Boisseau; Cockrell's HIST. JOHNSON 1918, 179)
Source:Johnson, Bernice E. "Place Names In Six Of The West Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.

THE HISTORY OF JOHNSON COUNTY, MISSOURI
Madison Township
Biographies for Madison Township, Pages 744-774
Kansas City Historical Co. 1881
THOMAS J. ALLISON, farmer, P.O. Holden, Missouri, was born in Jefferson county, Ohio, June 12, 1825. He was a stone cutter and mason, and followed the business when he returned to Ohio. In 1866 he again came to Missouri, and until 1865. He came to Missouri in 1857, where he remained until 1860, located in Cass county, where he had purchased land before his trip owns 450 acres of well improved land all in cultivation. He was married in Ohio. In 1869 he moved into Johnson county, locating near Holden.
 W. P. BAKER, blacksmith and wagon manufacturer, Holden, Missouri, was born in Monroe county, Missouri, Nov. 20th, 1840. When he was about eight years of age he came to Johnson county with his parents. He then moved to St. Clair county, where he remained about ten years, during which time he worked where he remained about eight years. He then came to Johnson county and
with his father in a cabinet shop. He served three years in the union army, after which he opened a blacksmith and wagon shop in Henry county, located in Holden, where he opened a shop and established his present married to Miss Mary Quinly of Henry county, Missouri, by whom he had business, which is manufacturing wagons and doing all kinds of repairing. He was first married to Miss Mary Christian of Warrensburg, in 1865, who died in January, 1873, leaving two children. He was again 1850 in St. Clair county, Missouri. Mr. and Mrs. Baker are both members three children. Mr. Bakers' father was a native of Kentucky and came to Missouri when a young man, and now lives in Henry county, and is a cabinet workman. His mother was also a native of Kentucky and died in of the Christian church. RICHARD BELL, he quit the road. In 1867 he built what is known as the Bell House, one proprietor of the Bell House, Holden, Missouri, is a native of New York. In 1852 he was engaged on the Mo. P. R.R., and ran on the first engine from St. Louis to Holden. He also built a brick business house on the main business street. He is somewhat retired now, but still looksafter his interests here and in Kansas City, and watches important investments. H.W. BOXMEYER, Holden P.O. The subject of this sketch is the son of John H. Boxmeyer, fall of '61, enlisted in the 3d Illinois cavalry. He with his regiment education in the schools of that country. When 19 years of age he emigrated to the United States, landing at New Orleans in the fall of 1857, remaining in New Orleans but a short time; he then moved to Cass county, Illinois, where he was engaged in farming; when the war of the rebellion came on, he espoused the cause of the Union, and in the early
March, 1868, he moved to Johnson county, Missouri, settling at Holden, participated in some of the hard fought battles of the war. At the battle of Guntown in June, '64, he was taken prisoner, and for five months was confined in the Andersonville prison. After peace was declared he returned to his Illinois home, where he remained about one year, when he removed to St. Louis, where he remained for two years. In and engaged in the grain and grocery business; he remained in the
are three children: Charles H., Bertram W. and Edith M. Mr. Boxmeyer
grocery business about eleven years, disposing of this business, he and his partner Mr. Bluhm erected large grain elevators, and have been extensively engaged since that time, in the buying and shipping of all kinds of grain. July 2, 1875, Mr. Boxmeyer married Miss Sarah Huzzard, a most estimable and refined lady of this city. From this union, there can truly be called a domstic man, and with his interesting little
half interest in the large and extensive grain elevators, besides family, he enjoys the pleasure and comforts of one of Holden's most beautiful homes. In his several business relations Mr. Boxmeyer is unostentatious, enjoying the confidence of all. In business Mr. Boxmeyer has been very successful; he owns a fine farm about two miles west of Holden, well improved, and under a high state of cultivation. In this city, he owns the fine residence he occupies on Main street, and also a interests in other business buildings. JAMES H. BRADLEY,
was also engaged in the manufacture of tobacco, which he sold to the postoffice, Holden, Missouri, was born in Tennessee, in 1798. When fifteen years old he moved to Kentucky, where he remained until 1830, when he came to the state of Missouri, and located near Columbus, then in Lafayette county, where he remained one year, and then moved into the neighborhood of what is now known as Rock Springs, and settled on and entered government land. His first house was made of logs, with a wooden chimney. In his early life he learned the saddler's trade. He seventeen he entered the confederate army under Gen. Marmaduke and merchants of Warrensburg, and quite extensively through Kansas. He also run quite an extensive brick manufactory, selling brick to parties in
Holden, and in the surrounding country. He afterwards engaged in farming and stock raising, and raising tobacco. In 1824 he was married to Miss Lucy S. Violett, by whom he had eight children; four of whom are living. Mr. and Mrs. B. are both members of the M. E. church. James C. Bradley, the fourth son, was born March 1, 1847. At the age of
came to Missouri and purchased land, and then returned and brought the served fourteen months. He returned home after the summer of 1865, and engaged in farming. He was married October 7, 1875, to Miss Emma Stark, by whom he has three children: Leslie H., Edwin H. and Elma T. Mrs. B.is a member of the M.E. church south. WM. T. BROWNLEE, deceased. Was a native of Pennsylvania, and was born in Washington county, January 18, 1808. He lived in his native county until he arrived at manhood. His early education was quite limited, and his mother being a widow, the care of the family fell upon him. In 1868 he
and Sada J., now Mrs. Albright. Robert is now in the wholesale grocery
family in 1869, and located two miles west of Centerview, Johnson county, where he remained about two years, after which he moved onto a farm on Black Water, where he remained until May 1, 1871, when he moved onto the farm on which his widow now lives, and where he continued to reside until his death, which occurred on the 29th day of December, 1879, caused by gun shot, fired by a man named Church. Mr. B. was an active and energetic farmer, and dealt largely in stock. He was first married to Miss Hester Brownlee, by whom he had two children, Robert L.
Holden city, watchmaker and jeweler. Was born in France in the year
business in Steubenville, Ohio. Mr. Brownlee was again married to Miss Mattie A. McNeal, daughter of Joseph McNeal, of Ohio. Mrs. Brownlee is a lady of culture and refinement, and rare domestic habits. She has had two sons, Rolla C. and William B. Mr. B's land estate consists of 677 acres, most of which is well improved, with good substantial buildings. Mr. and Mrs. B. were both members of the U.P. church, and at his death Mr. B. was an elder. He was always highly honored and respected as a neighbor, and always took a very active part in church and educational matters. LOUIS BERTHOUD,
business and he stands at the head among the best workmen in the county.
1835, February 14. He learned his trade as above in that country under the supervision of a skilled workman, and at an early age was master of the same. He came to the United States when seventeen years of age, and followed his business in the following prominent cities: Richmond, Indiana, Cleveland, Ohio, Leavenworth, Kansas, coming to this state from the last named place in 1866, and starting his present business in this city. Mr. Berthoud has built up a good business in all the departments. His thorough knowledge as a practical workman has increased each year's His store is made attractive with a varied stock of all goods pertaining
education in this way. When he was ten years of age, he moved with his
to the line, and no house in the county enjoys a reputation for straightforward and honorable dealing ahead of this, and Johnson county has good reason to feel proud of him as one of her adopted citizens. JOHN W. CAMPBELL, farmer and stock raiser, P.O. Holden, Missouri, was born in North Carolina, March 8, 1828. His father was a native of that state, and was a farmer by occupation, and was a soldier in the war of 1812. He died in 1857. John W. spent his youth on a farm. His early education was very limited; he, however, availed himself of every opportunity, and spent all his spare time in reading, and acquired a good English parents to the state of Indiana, where he remained until 1853, when he Payne in 1856. Miss Payne was a native of Illinois, and the daughter of removed to McDonough county, Illinois, and settled on a farm, where he remained until 1866, when he moved to Missouri, and settled in Johnson county, two and one-half miles northwest of Columbus, on a farm which he still owns, consisting of 240 acres of well-improved land. He commenced business for himself at the age of twenty-one, in very meagre circumstances. Soon after his arrival in Columbus township, he engaged in the stock business and has been extensively engaged in carrying on his farm, and dealing in cattle and hogs. He has always been successful in his dealings, associating experience with good judgment, and never engaging recklessly in any business. He was married to Miss Mary E. James M. Payne, a prominent farmer of that state. By this union they have had four children, three of whom are living: Martha E., Cora E.,
and Flora A. -the last two being twins and settled on his present farm, known as the Marion farm, containing
Mr. and Mrs. Campbell and one daughter are members of the Christian Church, and among its most liberal contributors. Mr. Campbell first moved to Holden in 1873, where he remained till 1874, when he moved back to the farm, where he remained two years, and again moved to Holden, where he has resided ever since. WASHINGTON CARNEY, farmer P. Holden, Missouri, was born in Kentucky in 1834. He lived in his native state until sixteen years of age, when he went to the state of Illinois, where he remained two years, and then came to Missouri, and located in Scotland county, in 1852. He came to Johnson county in 1866, 522 acres, 400 under fence, with good, substantial buildings. The main
January 15, 1819. He received a liberal education at the common and
branch of Blackwater runs through his farm, affording plenty of water for the stock all the year around. He was married in Scotland county, January 22, 1857, to Miss Sarah E. Fryrear, a native of Kentucky. By this union they have ten children: Sarah, Jefferson D., Robinson Lee, Joshua C., David P., Nora O., Lillie B., Gilbert, Charles S., and Vest. GEORGE D. CARPENTER, P. O. Holden, was born in Erie county, Pennsylvania, September 29, 1844, but was principally raised in western New York. Received primary education in the common schools, and afterward attended the Randolf academy of New York. Ahaz F. Carpenter, his father, who is an attorney, and a citizen very highly respected for his ability, integrity, and high moral standing. Is a native of New York, and born in Chautauqua county, select schools of his county. He spent a part of his youth in a
and Lotta C. Mr. and Mrs. Carpenter are worthy members of the
flouring-mill and learning the business thoroughly, he continued in milling until 1867, then engaged in the dry goods business, which he followed until 1869, when he moved to Holden, where he has resided ever since. He studied law in his native state. Soon after his arrival at Holden, he was appointed justice of the peace, and at the same time notary public, which office he has held continuously till the present time, with the exception of justice of peace one term. He was elected again in the fall of 1880 to justice of peace; in the spring of 1881 was elected town attorney, which office he holds at present. In 1842, on the 7th day of July, he was married to Miss Mary Jackson, a native of Erie county, Pennsylvania. The result of this union is five children, all living: Mary A., George D. (our subject), Elizabeth S., Henry P., Presbyterian Church. George D. Carpenter, who is our subject, came to
educated at the common schools. His father had acquired a large estate,
Holden the same year his father did and was identified with the insurance and real estate business, which he followed for some time, and at the same time carried on the dry goods business, which he continued until 1881, when he abandoned the insurance, but is still engaged in the sale of real estate. Mr. Carpenter was married, in 1871, to Miss Ella S. Barr, of Ohio, daughter of James Barr. By this union they have three children: Fred S., Charley P., and Clara. Mrs. Carpenter is a member of the Presbyterian Church. C. L. CARTER, physician, born in Ray county, March 1, 1832. His father, William Carter was a native of Virginia, emigrating to Tennessee at a very early day. (Born in 1806). William's father moved to Ray county when he was quite small and where he acquired a fair English education. His mother was a native of South Carolina, born July 15, 1808. C.L. Carter was but at his death it was squandered by the administrators. Thus the
parents were both natives of Kentucky. His father was a merchant and
youth was compelled to seek such employment as he could find. He began his career as a teacher, which he followed for a short time, then began the study of medicine, and in the spring of 1851 moved to Cass county and entered the St. Louis Medical College, and graduated with the honors of his class in 1857. In 1862 he entered the army as surgeon. On his return from the army he wrote a treatise on pathology, which was received with much favor by his alma mater as a text book. He came to this county in 1859 and has a fine residence in Holden. His landed estate numbers 1,200 acres, all in cultivation. The Doctor, aside from his extensive practice, devotes his spare time to the sciences, writing articles and corresponding with some of the leading medical journals of the day. W. L. CHRISTIAN, of the firm of Starkey & Christian, Holden, Missouri, is a native of Pettis county, Missouri, where he was born in September, 1838. His farmer, and came to Missouri about 1826. He moved his family to the
in the business of farming. He died in Hardin county in the year 1853.
state in 1835, and settled in eastern Missouri. He soon returned to Pettis county, where W. L. was born, whose youth was spent on a farm. His early education was obtained in the common schools. He afterward attended the Chapel Hill College, and then went to Salt Lake City, Utah; returning in 1861, he entered the army and served until 1866, when he came to Holden and formed a partnership with J. Starkey and engaged in the lumber business. He was united in marriage to Miss Emma J. Walton, of Holden, on the 30th of September, 1872. Miss Walton was a daughter of Judge Walton. By this union they have four children: Bert W., Floy, Ode and W. Perry. Mr. and Mrs. Christian are both acceptable members of the Christian church, and are among its most liberal contributors. HENRY C. CONNER, of the firm of Conner & Smith, is a native of Ohio, and was born in Hardin county, Ohio, on the nineteenth day of May, 1844. His father was a native of Delaware, and emigrated to Ohio at an early day and engaged
members of the M.E. church, and are among its most liberal contributors.
Henry spent his boyhood days on the farm, and followed the business till he was about twenty-five years of age. In 1868 he came to Missouri and settled in the city of Holden, Johnson county, where he has resided ever since. Soon after his arrival in Holden he engaged in the grain business with J.G. Cope. The two remained together about four years, when Mr. Cope retired from the firm and engaged in the banking business. Mr. Conner continued alone in the grain business about four years longer, when he transferred his business to the grist mill, buying out the interest of William Starkey, and forming a partnership with J. H. Smith, which still exists. They are engaged in buying and shipping grain and manufacturing flour, most of which is shipped to St. Louis, Missouri. In 1876 he was elected to the office of councilman of the city of Holden. He was married in the city of Holden, in 1875, to Miss Emma Cheney, of that city, who is a native of Illinois. By this union they have one daughter: Hettie E. Mr. and Mrs. Conner are acceptable W. M. COVENTRY,
time, the first business house established. Mr. C. followed the
P. O. Holden, one of the oldest settlers of Holden, is the subject of the following sketch. He was born in the state of Illinois, July 29, 1816, and is of English descent. His father was among the early settlers of St. Clair county, Illinois, and was for many years identified with the business interests of Bellville, he building the first mill in that city. He afterward emigrated and settled on what was known as the Amerson bottoms, where he resided until 1820, when he died. Mr. W.M. Coventry's youth was spent on a farm. His advantages for an education were somewhat limited, owing to the fact of there being so few schools at that early day. He, however, applied himself, and improved what opportunities he had, fitting himself for a business life. He commenced business in Madison county, Illinois, and remained there until the year 1865, when he moved to Missouri, settling in Holden. He has resided there ever since, engaged in the mercantile business, bringing the first stock of goods brought to Holden after the war, and, at that mercantile business for a number of years. Mr. Coventry was the first
23, 1842. His father, Joseph Crane, was one of the early settlers of
mayor of Holden, and has served several years as city councilman. He has also held positions on the board of education. Mr. Coventry had dealt largely in real estate. In 1869 he built the M.E. chapel, in Holden, and about the same time erected his fine residence. Mr. C. has laid out 3 additions to the town of Holden, and was for a number of years a stockholder and director in the Holden bank. Mr. Coventry has been twice married. He first married, in 1840, Miss Priscilla D. Stockland, who lived but a few years. From this union there was one child, who died shortly after the mother. He was again married, January 18, 1848, to Miss Elizabeth Semen, of St. Clair county, Ills. From this union there were three children: Sarah C., Mary E., Charles W. and James H. Sarah C. and Charles W. are both dead. Mr Coventry, as a business man, has been very successful, always engaging his time and money in all worthy and benevolent purposes. He is one of the leading members of the M.E. church of that city. HENRY B. CRANE, liveryman, Holden, Mo., was born in Muskegan county, Ohio, on January that part of the country, and was a farmer by occupation; he now lives
Davidson, his father, was a native of the same state, and came to
in Marion county. Henry spent his youth on a farm. At the age of 18 he left the farm and went to clerk for his brother. He then went to Illinois, and in 1861 he enlisted in the union army in company H, 59th Illinois volunteers, and served three years. He then retired to Marion county the home of his father, and engaged in the mercantile business with his father and brother for eighteen months. In 1866 he came to Missouri, and located in Holden. Soon after he arrived he accepted a clerkship with Peer, Nichols & Co., and was with them eight months, after which he engaged in the livery business with Van Mater, until March, 1867, when his brother J.H. Crane bought out Van Mater's interest, and the firm was H.B. Crane & Bro. On the 23d of March, 1881, he bought out his brother's interest and now continues the business himself. He is the oldest liveryman in the county, and established the first livery in that part of the county. He was appointed deputy marshal in Holden. He is a member of the Knights of Pythias, and Odd Fellows. N.B. DAVIDSON, farmer, P. O. Holden, Mo., was born in Alabama, Jan. 8, 1829. Wm. Missouri in 1830, and settled in Lafayette county, where he remained one
he spent one term at this institution, then he moved to Missouri,
year, and then moved to Johnson county, and settled on Walnut creek about eight miles north of Warrensburg, where he lived two years, and then moved out on a farm, four miles east of Holden, where he resided until his death, which occurred in May. 6, 1879. Nathan B. spent his youth on a farm, and in 1847 he crossed the plains. He returned in 1848 and engaged in farming and stock-raising. He was married Jan. 11, 1855, to Miss Louisa Hatton, daughter of Joseph Hatton, Esq. By this union they have four children: J. Walker, Mary J., Virginia and Missouri. During the late war his house was burned and his family turned out-of- doors. An attempt was also made to confiscate his lands. After peace was declared he went to work again with renewed energy, now owns 225 acres, all well improved, with good substantial buildings. Mr. Davidson has always been a peaceable and industrious citizen, and a kind neighbor. DR. SAMUEL DAY, P. O., Holden, was born in Licking county, Ohio, Nov. 10, 1846. His youth was spent on a farm, and he received a liberal education from the schools of his native county. When about 20 years old, he commenced the study of medicine, and entered the medical college at Cincinnati, Ohio;
he erected a small log house which was burnt by the jayhawkers on the
settling at Pittsville, Johnson county, where he began the practice of his profession. Here he remained until the fall of 1874, when he returned to the medical college at Cincinnati, took a regular course and graduated in February, 1875. He then returned to Missouri and resumed the practice of his profession. While located at Pittsville, Dr. Day enjoyed a large and extended practice. In the fall of 1880, he failing in health and wishing better school advantages for his children, moved his family to Holden. Here the Dr. took his position among the leading physicians of the city, where his skill and ability justly placed him. December 17, 1868, Dr. Day married Miss Laura A. Glancy, a native of Licking county, Ohio; from this union there are three children, viz: Clara C., Alice V. and Herman. The Dr. owns a fine residence in Holden, with extended grounds beautifully ornamented with fruit, evergreen and other trees. AMOS M. DEMASTERS, farmer, Sec. 27, P.O. Holden, Missouri. Was born in Johnson county, August 5th, 1860. His father, August J. Demasters, came to Missouri with his father's family and settled in Lafayette county. He removed to Johnson county at a very early day and entered government land, on which
in agricultural pursuits, in which he has been quite successful. In
8th of July, 1862. He was one of the earliest settlers of the county and lived on the old homestead until his death, which occurred in December 1864. His wife, Amos' mother, was a native of Kentucky. In 1868 she was again married to a very worthy gentleman by the name of J. N. Campbell, a native of Virginia, who came to Lafayette county in 1854, and to Johnson county in 1868 where he has lived ever since on the old homestead and takes care of the boys. Amos M. was married to Miss Susie Russell on February 9th, 1881. Miss Russell was a native of Kentucky. Wm. A. Demasters, brother of Amos M., was born in March 1864, and is a resident of this county. JAMES M. DORMAN, farmer, Sec. 4, P.O. Holden, Missouri, was born in 1839, in Owen county, Kentucky. He removed to Campbell county with his parents, when he was about eight years of age, where he remained until he was twenty-one, when he entered the confederate army, where he served two years, after which he went to Illinois, where he remained for four years, during which time he was married to Miss Christina Cook of Kentucky, August 1st, 1866. During the same year he emigrated to Johnson county, Missouri, where he was engaged as a teacher until 1878, when he engaged 1870 he moved on his present farm, consisting of 100 acres of well-
P.O. Holden, Missouri, was born in England in 1830, where he lived until
improved land. His father was a native of Maryland, and was born in 1804. His mother was born in the city of Hartford, Connecticut. She is still living and enjoys very fair health. Mr. and Mrs. Dorman are both members of the Baptist church, in good standing and contribute liberally to its support. J. J. FITZGEARLD, proprietor of the Bell House, Holden, Missouri, was born in Kentucky, July 28th, 1843. When quite small he moved with his parents to Louisville, and from thence to Indiana, and at the age of fifteen years he began railroading, and was employed as a brakesman. He was afterwards promoted to conductor on a passenger train and served ten years. He then engaged in the hotel business in Tyler, Texas, where he remained two years. In 1869 he came to St. Louis, Missouri, where he was again engaged as a passenger conductor on the Ohio &. Miss. R.R. for three years. In 1878 he moved to Breckenridge, Missouri, where he was appointed road master, and held the position until 1880. He then engaged in the hotel business in Brookfield, Mo. From there he went to Herman, where he was engaged in the ice business. He sold out his interest and came to Holden and bought out E.B. Bartlett, and has since conducted the Bell House of Holden. GEORGE GIBBS, seventeen years of age, when he came to America and located within six
agent, Holden, Missouri; was born in Franklin county, Missouri,
miles of Buffalo, with Hon. Lewis Allen, the noted fine-stock raiser, whose farm contains 1000 acres. He afterwards went to work with R.F. Elliott, the author of the book entitled, "The Hand Book of the Western Fruit Culturist," with whom he remained one year, after which he went to the State of Michigan, and purchased his first piece of land, and went to farming. During the California excitement, he went to that gold region and was quite successful. In 1853 he returned to Michigan, sold his farm and bought again in another part of the state, where he remained until 1862, when he returned to England and traveled over his native country. In 1863 he returned to this country and disposed of his farm, and became manager of a packing house, run by an English firm. He remained with them one year, and then went to Iowa, where he was engaged in the grain and lumber business for four years. In 1870 came to Missouri, and located on the farm on which he now lives. His success as a wheat grower is wonderful. He was married in 1850 to Miss Lucinda West of Ann Arbor, Michigan. He has four children: Ida A., Lillie E., Nellie C., and George B. Mrs. Gibbs is a member of the M.E. church, and Mr. G. of the Episcopal. He is a very successful farmer and his articles on agriculture have been copied in all parts of Great Britain. M.S. GRAY,
wheat growing, to which his land is well adapted. Previous to this he
December, 1841. His father was a traveling man. His early education was obtained in the common school, then known as Des Perse College in St. Louis county. He also attended Jones' Commercial College of St. Louis, Missouri. In 1860 he commenced rail-roading, and served as a brakeman until an accident occurred in which he lost his right leg. He then entered a freight office at Jefferson city. In 1865 he came to Holden and entered the R.R. office, where he has acted as agent ever since. He was married in 1870 to Miss Georgie E. Garnett of Holden, who was a native of Virginia. By this union they have three children: William D., M.S. Jr. and H. R. His father was from N.Y. and died in 1853 in St. Louis county. W. W. HALL, farmer and stock-raiser, Sec. 19, P.O. Holden, Missouri, was born in Logan county, Kentucky, May 26th, 1836. He spent his youth on a farm, and obtained his early education in the common schools of his neighborhood. He was married in his native county, in 1855, to Miss Martha Logan. In 1862 he moved to Illinois where he remained until 1869, when he moved to Johnson county, Missouri, and purchased a farm in Chilhowie township, where he remained about seven years, then sold out and bought his present farm, consisting of 160 acres of well improved land, with good substantial buildings. He is extensively engaged in
deputy assessor in 1880, and was reappointed in '81, which office he
fed stock. He has been township-treasurer of Chilhowie township, for two terms, and is at present a school director. Mr. and Mrs. Hall are both members of the Baptist church, having joined about 27 years ago. They have four children, three girls and one boy. Mr. Hall is a kind neighbor and universally esteemed by all who know him. He is the owner of the celebrated Chalybeate spring, situated in a most advantageous place for pleasure seekers and as a health resort. WILLIAM M. HAMILTON, farmer, Sec. 33, P.O. Holden, Missouri, is a native of Johnson county, and was born Dec. 14th, 1874. He received his early education in the common schools. His father, A.B. Hamilton, was a native of Tennessee. He was a farmer, and emigrated to Missouri, about the year 1833, stopping one year in Lafayette county, after which he came to Johnson county and settled on Sec. 28, obtaining most of his ]and from the government, which he improved for himself. He owned 420 acres and was quite an extensive stock raiser. He lived on the old homestead until his death, which occurred in September, 1878. Mm. M. Hamilton's mother was also a native of Tennessee. She died when William was quite young. Mr. Hamilton was married on March 12th, 1874, to Miss Mary M. Brown, a lady of culture and refinement. By this union they have one daughter, Dora, born Jan. 30th, 1875. Mr. Hamilton received the appointment of
Winchester. Young Harmon passed his youth like most of the boys of his
still holds. He also carries on his farm at the same time. Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton are both members of the Cumberland Presbyterian church. J.B. HANK, Holden, Missouri, is a native of West Virginia, born in Monroe county Jan. 22, 1832, and in 1838 he emigrated to Ohio with his parents, where he received his education, and spent his youth on a farm. His father and mother were both natives of Virginia. His father died in 1854, and his mother in 1848. J.B. is the third son of six, and moved to Knox county Illinois in 1856, where he remained about two years. He went to California in 1859, and remained until 1861, during which time he was a miner; from there he went to Nevada, and from there to Montana, and thence to Idaho, and in December, 1868, he came to Missouri, and settled in Johnson county, locating near Holden, where he has resided ever since. His farm contains 180 acres of land, well improved. He devotes most of his time to growing small grain, to which his farm is well adapted. Mr. H. has served four years as deputy sheriff of Johnson county. J.P. HARMON. Among, the business men of this township, none stands higher in the estimation of the public than J.P. Harmon, the subject of this sketch. He is a native of Kentucky, and was born Jan. 21, 1840. Louis Harmon was also a native of Kentucky, and lived for many years in New native county in farming, and acquiring an education. The father moved
war, after which he returned home, but went back to Mexico again and
to Missouri in the fall of 1845, and settled in the north-eastern part of Johnson county, where he resided until his death, which occurred in March 1863. In 1865 Mr. Harmon began business for himself; that of farming and dealing in live stock, which business he has continued ever since. He was married in the year 1867 to Miss Susan Patterson, a daughter of Samuel Patterson of Lafayette county. From this union there are two children, both of whom are yet living, viz: Sarah, and Mary. In the of fall of 188O, Mr. Harmon was elected from this county to the lower branch of the Legislature; and to his credit it can be said, that he made a faithful, competent, and worthy officer. Mr. Harmon is a man of more than ordinary intelligence, unassuming in appearance. In business, strictly honorable and honest, enjoying the confidence of all. Mr. Harmon owns a farm of about 500 acres, under a good state of cultivation. PLEASANT B. HILL, farmer, Madison township; postoffice, Holden. Was born in Tennessee March 22, 1823. He came to Missouri with his parents when about eleven years of age. His father was a native of South Carolina, and died in Johnson county, Missouri, on what is now known as the Brownlee farm in 1837. Pleasant spent his youth on a farm, and attended the common schools; but being the older son he worked hard to help maintain the family. When he arrived at manhood he went west and entered the Mexican traveled through the republic, and then went to New Orleans, and from
dentist, Holden, Missouri, is a native of Ohio, born in Knox county,
there he returned home. The following year he again went to Mexico, thence to California, where he remained ten years engaged in farming and mining. He returned again to Missouri about the time the war broke out, and entered the confederate army and served during the war, being most of the time in Missouri and Arkansas. In 1865 he was married to Miss May F. Mattock, of Kentucky, daughter of George C. Mattock, Esq., and has since been engaged in farming, and has been very successful. His farm and other lands amount to 417 acres. The family consists of three children: May C., William P. and Bellvinia. JOHN JOHNSON, blacksmith, Holden, Missouri. Was born in England in 1836, and came to the United States in 1865, landing at Jersey City. He went from there to Albany, where he opened a shop, having learned his trade in his native country. He run the shop about eighteen months, and then moved to Illinois, where he remained about twelve months. About the year 1868 he came to Missouri, and located in Holden, and resumed his trade, and has also run a wagon shop in connection with the blacksmith shop. In 1857 he was married to Miss Margaret Johnson, daughter of Andrew Johnson, a prominent citizen of that place. By this union they have six children living: Esther (now Mrs. Philips), Adam, Lizzie, Matthew, Lena and Earnest J. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson are both members of the Christian church. Mr. Johnson identified himself with the church when quite young. MARTIN V. JOHNSON, January 20, 1839. His father, Joseph Johnson, was a native of the same
after which he and his brother bought out Mr. Steele's interest, and
place. His grandfather was a native of Pennsylvania, and died at the remarkable age of eighty-seven years. Martin's father was a prominent farmer, and is still living in the enjoyment of fair health, and is about seventy-six years of age. Martin spent his youth on a farm and received his early education in the common schools. In 1860 he went to learn the dentist's trade with Dr. McBryer, of Ohio, and was engaged for some time in study and preparation, and then entered the dental college at Cincinnati, Ohio, and graduated in the spring of 1865, and went to Mt. Vernon, Ohio, and practiced until 1868, when he came to Holden, Missouri. Soon after his arrival he resumed his profession, and has been actively engaged ever since, and has been very successful. He was elected to the city council and held the position for five years. He is a director of the bank of Holden. He was married in Ohio in 1868, to Miss Malinda Bricker, of Knox county. The family consists of one son, Archie H. Johnson. Mr. Johnson has been a member of the Presbyterian church for eight years, and also one of the ruling elders, which position he held for six years. He also has been assistant superintendent of the Sabbath schools about seven years. GEORGE F. KENNEDY, of the firm of Kennedy Bros. & Co., Holden, Mo., is a native of Canada and was born in December, 1853. He came to the United States in 1874 via Detroit, Mich., and thence to Holden, Mo., where he engaged at once in the grocery business, serving five years as clerk for Wm. Steele, have continued in the business ever since. They are young men, but they
native of Alabama, and emigrated to Missouri in 1851 and settled at a
possess a large amount of business talent and ingenuity, and exhibit much judgement in making their purchases. The store room is 144 feet long and literally filled with goods. They study the wants of their customers, and their stock consists of everything in the grocery line. They commenced business in very meagre circumstances. George F. when he arrived in Holden had only 40 cents. He was married on the twenty-fifth day of June, 1879, to Miss Alice Sparks, a native of Bedford, Pa. He is a member of the Odd Fellows and also of the Knights of Honor. Their sales last year amounted to over thirty thousand dollars. THOMAS D. KENNEDY, of the firm of Kennedy Bros. & Co., is also a native of the same country as that of his brother, viz: Canada. He came to Missouri and was married on May the 12th, 1881, to Miss Mattie Fowler, of St. Louis, Mo., who at that time was residing with her uncle. He is a member of Knights of Honor. WM. G. KING, insurance and real estate agent, Holden, Mo., is a native of Johnson county, Mo., and was born June 23, 1852. His boyhood days were spent on a farm. His early education was obtained in the common schools. He afterward attended the State University of Missouri. He was appointed agent of the Mo. P. R.R. at Kingsville, which position he held for about eighteen months, when he resigned and engaged in the dry goods business, which he followed about eighteen months, when he disposed of this and occupied his time in looking after his lands and farms, which consist of 320 acres, all of which is well improved. His father, W.G. King, was a point called Centre Knob, where he remained until his death which
age of seventeen, went to learn the blacksmith and plow maker's trade,
occurred in March, 1859. On first coming to the country he bought five thousand acres of choice lands, most of which was in one large tract. His mother is still living, and resides at Kingsville. Mr. King was married in 1873 to Miss Mary A. Tagg. By this union they have two children: Irene C. and Clarence E. He came to Holden in 1881 and engaged in the insurance and real estate business, and is the successor to G.D. Carpenter. Mr. and Mrs. King are both members of the Presbyterian church in high standing, and contribute liberally to its support. W.H. LIDDLE, of the firm of Stearns & Liddle, is a native of Iowa, and was born in Lee county, Nov. 19th, 1837. He received a good English education and commenced business for himself at the age of 21, and engaged in farming, which he followed until 1860, when he came to Missouri and settled near Smithtown, Pettis county. Here he engaged in the nursery business until 1868, when he removed to Johnson county and located near Holden and resumed the same business in partnership with his brother, J.F. Liddle. In 1877 Mr. Liddle bought out the interest of J.S. Sherer, of the firm of Stearns & Sherer, and the firm then became Stearns & Liddle. He was married to Miss Mary M. McCormick, a native of Ohio, in April, 1867. They have two adopted children: Osker and Lilley. He has held several public offices and is an acceptable member of the Christian church. Mr. Liddle is also a member of the Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias and A.O.U.W. THOMAS S. McCLELAN, liveryman, Holden, Mo., was born in Green county, Ohio, June 8, 1830. He received a good English education at the common schools, and at the with the Franklin Bros., of Springfield, Ohio. He remained in that
farmer, section 27, P.O. Holden, Mo. Was born in Lincoln county,
business until 1866, when he sold out and came west, settling in Henry county, Missouri, where he engaged in farming and dealing in stock. He followed this until 1870 when he removed to Holden, Johnson county, Mo., where he has resided ever since. Soon after his arrival in Holden, he engaged in the livery and feed business, in which he has been very successful. He is an experienced horseman, keeping good and substantial rigs for the accommodation of his customers. He is a member of the A.O.U.W. On Nov. 1, 1854, he was married to Miss Henrietta B. McCleland of Green county, Ohio. They have five children living; Emma Z. (now Mrs. Holden,) Elizabeth, John H., Frank C., and May B. J.C. McCLURE, assistant cashier of Holden Bank, Holden, Mo., was born in Pulaski county Kentucky, Nov. 26, 1842. He went from Kentucky to Iowa, where he was married to Miss Martha Warford, on the 5th of March, 1863. On May the 5th, he started with his new bride in a wagon for Colorado. He stopped in Canon City, where he remained until 1867, during which time he was engaged in the cattle business. In 1867, he came to Holden, Mo., but still kept up his business in Colorado, and shipped the first train- load of cattle and sheep from Pueblo, over the Atchison, Topeka, & Santa Fe Railroad. He has been a stockholder in the Holden bank, since 1875, and has been a director for several years. Although starting out in life in very meagre circumstances, he has been very successful. His family consists of three children; Charles M., Ida May, and Minnie B. Mr. and Mrs. McClure are acceptable members the Baptist Church, and are among its most liberal contributors. THOMAS L. McMULLIN. Kentucky, August 3d, 1837, and came with his father to Missouri in 1840.
Thomas C., Gelina, Martha M., Wm. P., Geo. D., Lethe J., and James H.
His father, Dillord McMullin, was a native of Virginia. At an early day he emigrated to Kentucky, where he resided until be came to Missouri and settled with his family in Ray county, where he now lives, and is a farmer and extensive grain raiser. Thomas L.'s early education was very limited, but he employed all his spare hours in reading, and storing his mind with useful knowledge. At the age of nineteen years he commenced business for himself. He was married to Miss Martha Bailey of Indiana, on July 7th, 1858. He then engaged in the raising of tobacco, corn, and hemp, in which he was quite successful, and which he continued to follow until 1862, when he became a government employee, and crossed the plains as a teamster, where he was detained for two years, and then returned and volunteered in Co. B, 44th Mo. Infantry, and served about twelve months, and participated in several battles, among which were those of Rolla, and Franklin, and Cedar Point. He was honorably discharged in August, 1865, when he returned home and went to farming again, which he followed until February, 1873, when he removed to Johnson county, and settled on a farm known as the old Johnny Windsor farm. He sold this and bought near Columbia; in two years he sold out, and bought a farm near Pittsville; selling this he bought another near Holden known as the Fichlen farm; disposing of this he bought the place known as the Dan Hogan place, near Rock Spring church, and planted on it one of the oldest apple orchards in Johnson county. The farm consists of 409 acres of land, well improved, with three springs of excellent water and plenty of stone, coal, and rock quarries. Mr. McMullin has had nine children, eight of whom are living; Mary A. (now Mrs. Scritchfield,) John D.,
farmer , sec. 3, P.O., Holden, was born in St. Clair county, Ill., on
Mr. and Mrs. McMullin, and three of their children are members of the Missionary Baptist Church, and contribute liberally to its support. Mr. McMullin commenced life in very meagre circumstances, but by industry and perseverance, associated with good judgment has succeeded well in his line, and is a good neighbor, and has set a good example of what can be done by energy and perseverance. J.P. ORR, attorney, Holden, Mo., is a native of Ohio, and was born in August, 1832. He attended the common schools, after which he entered an academy located in his native county. When he was about twenty-five years of age, he commenced the study of law, and was admitted to the bar in 1865, after which he engaged in the practice of his profession. In 1865, he went to Illinois, and spent some time in traveling over the state. In 1868, he came to Kansas City, from there he removed to Leavenworth, Kansas, from there to Junction City. He then returned to Ohio, where he spent about six months, and then came to Holden, where he has resided ever since. Soon after his arrival, he opened a law office, and has been actively engaged since that time. He was elected City Attorney three times, in 1872, 1875, and 1879. He has been a stockholder and director in the bank of Holden, for a number of years. He was first married to Miss Elizabeth Smith, a native of Ohio, who died in 1862, leaving two children, John S. and Marshal F. He was again married in 1872, to Miss Utilla Galloday, of Holden, by whom he has one child, Laura C. Mr. Orr identified himself with the M.E. Church in 1852. He and his wife are both acceptable members and liberal contributors. Mr. Orr owns a most beautiful residence, indicative of taste and comfort throughout, with extensive grounds, and exquisite surroundings. JOSEPH POTTER,
profession of medicine, though his father desired him to study law. In
January 1, 1832. His father, Matthew Potter, was a native of Maine, and was a sailor in his young days. He emigrated to Illinois in 1818, and was one of the early settlers of that state, and was a farmer by occupation, and lived in St. Clair county until a year or two before his death, which occurred in 1875. Joseph spent his youth on his father's farm, and received his early education in the common schools of the day. He lived in his native county until 1860, when he removed to Missouri and settled in Johnson county, locating near Holden, where he has resided ever since. Soon after he arrived he went to farming and raising stock. He is at present turning his attention to the importing of fine cattle. He now owns a farm of 140 acres, well improved and with good substantial buildings. He hauled the lumber to build his first house, from Syracuse, which was then the terminus of the Missouri P. R.R., a distance of seventy miles. Mr. Potter has at different times held the office of road overseer. He was married in Illinois, May, 1858, to Miss E.J. Turner, a native of St. Clair county, by whom he has seven children, all living: Junius F., Hannah M., Mary E., Jessie, L. D., Frederick, and Laura M. Mr. and Mrs. Potter are both members of the M. E. church. Mr. Potter is also a member of the Mutual Protective society. I.P. RANDALL, physician, Holden, Mo., was born near Auburn, Cayuga county, N.Y., September 19, 1821. He emigrated with his parents to Ohio, in 1833, and settled in Summit county. He took an academical course under the tutorship of John McGregor. His father was a native of Rhode Island. His great-grandfather came from England and was of the original family known as the Randolphs. He was also one of the original owners of the tract of land on which Providence now stands. Isaac P. chose the
engaged in farming, after which he went to Litchfield, Montgomery
1839, he entered the Willoughby Medical College near Cleveland, which has been closed since 1841. He was married in 1841, to Miss Diana H. Clapp, daughter of Cela Clapp, of the city of Kent, Ohio. In 1842, he joined the Christian church, and in 1843 he commenced the practice of medicine in Ohio, where he resided till 1848, when he moved to the state of Wisconsin, locating in the city of Milwaukee, where he remained about two years, after which he removed to Waupun, Badge county, where he continued to practice until 1866, when he attended the Chicago Medical college and received the honorary degree of Doctor of Medicines. In the summer of 1866, he returned to his field of practice, where he remained until 1870. He then came to Missouri and located in Holden. He became a member of the Masonic fraternity in 1861, and was elected chaplain of the lodge. He has also been an elder of the Christian church. His youth was spent on a farm, and his early education was obtained in a little old log school house. JOHN C. REED, of the firm of Reed & Daniels, of the Holden city mills, was born in Alexandria, Va., which at that time belonged to the district of Columbia, June 23, 1818. Silas Reed, his father, was a native of Massachusetts and was one of the early settlers of Alexandria, having emigrated to Virginia in an early day, and was for many years a prominent merchant of that place; he afterwards moved to Scott county, Ill., where he continued to reside until his death, which occurred in 1848. John C. his son spent a greater part of his youth as clerk in a dry goods store. In 1838, greater inducements being offered he went west and settled in Scott county, Ill., where he engaged in agricultural pursuits, and continued till 1848, when he engaged in merchandizing, and carried on this business for three years; quitting this, he again
He has held the office of school director in his district, and is at
county, Illinois, which place he engaged in the milling business and burned out, and sustained a very heavy loss, having no insurance, but being a man of industrious habits and true courage, went to work and in a few years had regained all that he had lossed, having previously moved to Washville; he then moved to Lawrenceville, Illinois, and from this place moved to Holden, Johnson county, Mo., about the year 1868. Soon after his arrival at the place he built the Holden city flouring mill, which was the first in this part of the county. Soon after its completion he took A.L. Daniels in as partner, which firm has continued the business up to the present time. The firm has always done a good business and have established an enviable reputation for honest and fair dealing. Mr. Reed was married in 1841 to Miss Caroline Kinsey of Alexandria, daughter of Zenas Kinsey, Esq. By this union they have had ten children, four of whom are living: John K., Kate E., now Mrs. G.W. McCabe, J.S. Reed and Carrie H. Mr. Reed is little above the average size, kind and affable in his manners. Being a decided Presbyterian he has always been much interested in the progress of his denomination, and he has been quite as much appreciated in the various departments of christian work as in his worldly matters. Mrs. Reed is also a worthy member of the same church. T.J. ROBERTS, P.O. Holden, Missouri, was born in Tennessee, December 21, 1843, and when about fifteen years of age he came to Missouri, with his parents. He served about two years in the confederate army, and participated in several important battles. At the close of the war he returned to his home and was engaged in farming. In April, of 1866, he was united in marriage to Miss Sarah C. Hays, of Johnson county. By this union they have six children: Anna, Mary E., Adah, Minnie R., Maggie, and Bertie.
Scott was born September 29, 1790, in Baron county, Kentucky. Having
present clerk of the district. His farm consists of 130 acres of well- improved land, with good, substantial buildings. FRANK RUSSELL, minister in charge of Rock Spring Church, was born in Kentucky, March 18, 1847. He came to Missouri in 1856, with his parents. His father J. C. Russell, was a native of Kentucky, and came to Missouri and settled in Johnson county, on a farm, near Columbus. He now lives in Hazel Hill township. Frank attended a select school in Kentucky, and afterwards entered McGee College. Soon after leaving college he entered the ministry under the C.P. Church. He preached one year at Westport, and three years at Lee's Summit, during which time he occasionally preached at Rock Spring Church, and afterward devoted all his time to that church, where he has been for six years. Under his direction the church has advanced rapidly, and they now contemplate erecting a new building, and turning the old one into a store. Mr. Russell was married in October, 1875, to Miss Mary J. Lauderdale. By this union they have two children, Albert H. and Walter L. VALINTINE SCOTT, stock-dealer, Holden, born in Cooper county, Missouri, April 18, 1835. Here he grew to manhood, working on his father's farm and going to school. When nineteen years of age he commenced buying and selling stock. In 1865 he came to Holden, where he has since resided. He married, soon after coming to this county, Miss Anna Hill, daughter of W.P. Hill, an old resident of Missouri. Their children are: Arthur M., Lillie B., Claud, Charlie T., and Scott, the youngest. Mr. Scott is a good business man, and highly respected by those who know him. OBITUARY.--Died on the 4th day of July, 1859, at the residence of his son-in-law, Cornelius Edwards, Robert Scott, in the sixty-ninth year of his age. Thus has fallen another of her country's noblest sons. Mr. just grown up at the time our country engaged a second time in
He lived in his native county until he arrived at manhood, during which
hostilities with Great Britain, he marched with the Kentucky volunteers to the south and was in the battle at New Orleans. Throughout the campaign he deported himself with commendable propriety and courage. While on guard the night after the battle, he captured a British soldier, and delivered him over to the proper officers, as a prisoner of war. At the conclusion of the war he returned to his native county, and married. Soon after which he emigrated to Boonville, in 1817. Perhaps, few men have passed the trials and difficulties of an early settler with more patience and fortitude than did he. Possessed of a frank and mild disposition, of sterling integrity, of just and honorable principles, respectful of the rights and feelings of all humanity, and generous to the needy, gentle, kind, attentive to the afflicted, affectionate and constant to his family, he passed through life receiving, even to the end, the respect and confidence of all who knew him. The writer is unacquainted with his religious views but had good opportunity to observe the calm and quiet resignation, with which he passed away. During a long illness he never murmured, and when reduced to utter helplessness, no impatience or dissatisfaction was ever manifested. About eighteen hours before his decease, he quietly and calmly asked the writer if anything could be done to relieve him, and being informed that he was, perhaps, beyond the reach of remedies, he submissively answered: "I thought so, too. I know I cannot last but a day or two." From this time he slowly declined, and died at twenty minutes after one o'clock A.M., on the 4th day of July, 1859. Thus passed away a good citizen, a kind husband, a generous and affectionate father, and a man of great goodness and excellence of character.-D. IRA B. SMITH, farmer, P. 0. Holden, Mo., was born in Green Co., Ill., Oct. 26th, 1838. time he acquired a good education. He commenced business for himself in
Mamie K. and Julia B. Mr. and Mrs. Smith are acceptable members of the
1861, when he left home and went to California and engaged in the stock business. In 1868 he came to Missouri and settled in Johnson county, three miles south-west of Holden. His farm being new he went to work to improve it himself, after which he engaged in the stock business. Still continuing to raise wheat and corn. He has been one of the most successful farmers in his township. In 1876 he moved to Holden, where he lives most of the time, still carrying on his farm. He was married in Illinois in 1864 to Miss Nancy J. Barton, a native of Massachusetts, and a lady of culture and refinement. By this union they have three children: Belle I., Mary E. and Nellie. Mr. Smith's father was a native of Connecticut. His mother was a native of Massachusetts, and is still living and enjoys fair health, having attained the age of 83. Mr. Smith was once elected to the office of township supervisor and served one term. JOHN H. SMITH, of the firm of Conner & Smith, Holden, Mo., was born in Logan county, Kentucky, June, 1837. His father was a native of Kentucky, and his mother was a native of Virginia. His father was a miller and a merchant. John spent his youth in his father's mill. In 1839 he moved to St. Louis with his parents. He was educated in Lafayette Seminary. He came to Johnson county in 1854 and settled at Warrensburg, where his father resided until the time of his death, which occurred in the year 1872. John H. commenced business in 1855, engaging in the milling business and following this until the outbreak of the war. In 1865 he engaged in farming and continued to farm until 1868, at which time he again engaged in the milling business. In 1876 he tore down his mill and moved it to Holden and established in his present business, taking into partnership Mr. H.C. Conner. He was married in 1861 to Miss Lucy E. Violett, of Jackson township, of this county, who is a native of Kentucky. By this union they have four children: Gracie F., Edward,
Oliver D. and George E. The father and mother of Mr. Smithson were both
M.E. church South, and are among its most liberal contributors. WM. C. SMITH, son of Clark Smith, was born in the city of Newark, Ohio, October 1843. He lived in his native city until his majority. At the outbreak the war he enlisted in Co. D, 22d Ohio Infantry, serving three years, going as a private, and was mustered out as 1st lieutenant. He took part in the battles of Shiloh, Fort Donelson and others. During his whole term of service did not loose a day by sickness. He was taken prisoner and held two hours, and was recaptured by his own men. In 1864 he returned to his farm home. He then went to Illinois, thence to Jefferson City, Mo., and to Holden, this county. Here he engaged in the implement business and continued this two years, during which time he was elected city alderman, and in 1874 was elected mayor of Holden also in 1875, and held the office continuously until 1880, and in 1881 was elected justice of the peace, which office he holds at the present. He was a candidate for State senator and came within 39 votes of being elected. In 1868 he joined the Masons, and in 1867 the Odd Fellows; also is a member of Knights Templar, Knights of Honor, and belongs to the order A.O.U.W. He married in 1868 to Miss Elizabeth Wilson, of Licking county, Ohio. They have three sons and one daughter, viz.: Jennie, Wm P., Clarence B. and Edward E.T. Mr. Smith has always been one ever active in any enterprise tending to the prosperity of his honored city. H.D. SMITHSON, merchant, Holden, Mo. Was born at Paris, Ky., Oct. 20th, 1845. His father removed to Illinois in 1858 and to Missouri in 1866. H.D. came to Missouri in 1868 and to Holden in 1872, and farmed one year, the engaged in the mercantile business which he has followed to the present time. Sept. 1, 1880, he became associated with M.T. Roberson in merchandising. He was married in Kentucky to Miss Catherine E. Fox, Jan. 16, 1868, who is a native of Kentucky. They have two children: natives of Kentucky; his father died in 1872, but his mother is still
farmer by occupation. He emigrated to Missouri in 1832, and settled in
living. He has held the offices of city marshal and city collector. He is a member of the Masonic order, Knights of Honor, Knights of Pythias and the A.O.U.W. Mr. and Mrs. Smithson are worthy members the Baptist church. INGHAM STARKEY, lumber dealer; postoffice, Holden. Was born in Ohio, October 9, 1831, and spent his youth on a farm, and learned the carpenter's trade after twenty years of age. His father moved to Illinois in 1844, and came to Missouri in 1851. Ingham came to Holden, July, 1866, engaging in the lumber business. He served as town councilman for eight years. He has been one of the directors of the bank of Holden since its organization, in 1872. He was elected vice president, and in 1880-1 he was elected president. Mr. S. is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and has been master of the lodge. He was married in 1856 to Miss S.A. O'Neil, daughter of H. O'Neil. She is a native of Saline county, Missouri. By this union they have two children, Mattie W. and Charley E. Mr. and Mrs. S. are worthy members of the Presbyterian church. WILLIAM STEELE, president of Farmers' and Commercial bank, Holden, Mo. Was born in Scotland, February 10, 1846. He went to Canada in 1855, where he remained until he came to Missouri, in 1870, and located in Holden, where he arrived in May, and bought out a grocery store. He followed this for eight years, when he sold out and went into the grain business, and continued in this for two years. In 1881 he engaged in the Farmers' and Commercial bank of Holden. He has been a member of the school board for a number of years. He was married in 1873 to Miss Mary E. Kennedy, of Canada, by whom he has three children: E.K., Mary M. and James H. Mrs. Steele is a strict member of the Episcopal church. JESSE C. STRANGE, farmer and stock raiser, section 2; postoffice Holden, Missouri. The subject of this sketch was born in Lafayette county, Missouri, December 25, 1833. His father, S.K. Strange, was a native of Kentucky, and a Lafayette county, where he lived until 1834, when he removed to Johnson
1822. His father (John M.'s grandfather), came from Hamphier county,
county, and located at Columbus, where he remained until 1836, when he moved to Bear Creek, where he remained until his death, which occurred in 1837. At the age of twenty Jesse C. went to California, and remained three years, during which time he was engaged in mining. He then returned to Johnson county. When the war broke out he was absent for four years, when he returned and bought the farm on which he now lives, consisting of about 500 acres, most of which is well improved, with substantial buildings, and a good peach and apple orchard. His residence is neat and tasty, with all the modern improvements. During his residence on this farm, he has been extensively engaged in farming and dealing in stock. He was married to Miss Dorathy J. Lee, of Howard county, Missouri, who died leaving one son, Charles L. He was again married to Miss Sarah C. Carmichael, a native of Kentucky. By this union they have two children: John W. and Tippie D. Mr. and Mrs. Strange are both members of the Christian church. JOHN M. TAYLOR, of the firm of Taylor and Bettes, hardware, was born in Pleasant county West Virginia, November 24, 1854. He attended the state university of Missouri and received a good English education. In 1875 he entered the Ontario College of Pharmacy, and graduated in 1878. He then came Holden and entered the drug business with Z.T. Miller. The style of the firm was Miller & Taylor. He remained in partnership with Mr. Miller until January, 1881, when he sold out and formed a partnership with A.O. Bettes, and bought out the firm of H.C. Bettes & Sons, hardware. The members of the present firm of Taylor & Bettes are both young men, but have the time and energy necessary to success. Their stock includes hardware, stoves, tinware and agricultural implements. Mr. Taylor is a member of the Knights of Honor, and is an acceptable member of the Presbyterian church. He came to Missouri in 1867, and located in Holden. Wm. C. Taylor, his father, was a native of old Virginia. He was born in Tyler county (now Pleasant County), West Virginia, March 18,
and entered Center college, then located at Danville, Kentucky, an old
east of the mountains, and was a farmer, and was also a distant relative of Zachary Taylor, and belonged to one of the first families of Virginia. Wm. C. lived on a farm until he was seventeen years of age. He received a good common school education, and has since been a self- educator. In 1837 he went to Washington county, Ohio, and located at Marietta, one of the oldest towns in the state. Here he accepted a clerkship with Thos. W. Enoch, and held this position some twelve years. He afterward studied law and was admitted to the bar. He was appointed deputy clerk of the court of common pleas, which deputy was ex-officio clerk of the higher courts. He held the position by appointment for several years. In 1866 he removed to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he engaged in the commission business for one year. In 1867 he came to Missouri and located in Holden. In 1868 he was elected to the town council. He has also held the position of city school director for a term of years. During his stay in Holden he has been a conveyancer, and has given considerable attention to the settlement of estates in the county. He was first married in 1851 to Miss Margaret Y. McCracken, who was a graduate of Marietta female seminary. She died leaving one son, John M. Mr. Taylor was again married to Miss Sarah Saxton, a native of Canada, who came to Johnson county about the same time Mr. Taylor did. Mrs. Taylor was a member of the M.E. church in Canada. HON. CHARLES C. TEVIS, who for many years has been a prominent farmer and stock dealer of this county, was born in Madison county, Kentucky, March, 1845. Cyrus Tevis his father, was also a native of Kentucky and was an enterprising farmer, but died when the subject of this notice was about one year old. Charles C. lived in his native county until nineteen years of age, during which time he received a liberal education in the common schools
and well established institute, where he took a regular course and
vacancy caused by the resignation of one of the members of the faculty.
graduated in 1867. After which he was engaged as tutor to fill a
one year after his arrival he embarked in the grocery business which he
In 1869 he removed to Johnson county, Mo., and located at Holden. About
business he had proved himself master of the situation. He has been
followed eighteen months, when he disposed of this and engaged in the stock business, and at the same time farming extensively in which
faithfully and filling the position with much credit to himself and
twice called upon to fill the responsible position as representative of his county, and was elected in the fall of 1876, serving his people
majority. He has served several years on the school board; was also a
satisfaction to his constituents. He was again called on to serve the second time, and was again elected in the fall of 1878 by a handsome candidate before the convention for State senator, and came within two
of which Mr. Tevis was a member. This union has been blessed by six
votes of being nominated. He was married in Princeton, Kentucky, to Miss May Hawthorne, December 23d, 1868, daughter of the Rev. J. Hawthorne, a prominent minister of the Presbyterian church of Princeton, children--Una, James, Ruth, Rose, Mary and Daniel. Mrs. Tevis died July
system and of education generally, always ready and willing to help any
7, 1879, leaving the above named children. Mr. Tevis' landed estate numbers about 800 acres, the largest portion of which is well improved. Personally Mr. Tevis is of a retiring mind, medium size, mild and affable in his deportment, a liberal advocate and of the common school enterprise tending to the public good. His residence is a very
native of Ohio, and a farmer by occupation. Mr. Van Matre's early life
substantial one, large, and of the modern improvements necessary for comfort and convenience; the spot on which it stands is sitely with all the shade and ornamental trees to render it attractive and healthy. ABNER VAN MATRE was born in Indiana, May 14, 1837. His father, David Van Matre was a was spent on his father's farm. He received a good liberal education
He was mustered out of service September, 1864, then returned to his
from the common schools of his native county. When the war came on Mr. V. enlisted as a volunteer soldier in the Union army, serving until the close of the war. He was engaged in some of the hard fought battles of the war, among which was, the fight of Vicksburg, Fort Gibson, Jackson, Champion Hill, Black River bridge, and at the final siege of Vicksburg. Indiana home. When about twenty years old Mr. V. married Miss Elizabeth
Matre was elected to the office of justice of the peace; after serving
A. Stewart, of his native county; from this union there are seven children, viz.: Lillian H., Peter C., Osee B., Minter T. S., James E. S., Maria D. A., and David J. In the year 1865, Mr. Van Matre moved his family to Missouri, settling at Holden, where he has since resided. Since Mr. V.'s residence in Missouri, he has been engaged in the practice of law, in which profession he stands well. In 1866, Mr. Van in this office for about three years, he then was elected city attorney,
mention than the subject of this notice. He is a native of Ireland, and
which office he filled for a number of years with credit to his constituents and honor to himself. At the spring elections of 1881, the citizens of Holden, appreciating his services in other offices, elected him to the responsible position of mayor of their city. To Mr. V.'s credit, it can be said, he has made as faithful and efficient officer as the city has ever had. ANDREW WARD. Among the successful business men of Holden, none are more worthy of born upon its virgin soil in the month of October, 1831. He came to the
which time he acted as dispatcher, and continued until 1878 when he
United States in the year 1846, landing at New York city. He embarked next from this place to Williamsport, Pennsylvania, where he remained about six years, then moved to the state of Missouri, stopping awhile at St. Louis, in which place he was employed by the Missouri Pacific Railroad, and where he remained until 1866, when he moved to Holden, this county, and still was in the employ of the same company, and continued with this company for an unusually long term of years, during retired, having served the company faithfully for a period of over
children born: James W., a very worthy and intelligent boy, who now
twenty-five years. After which he engaged in the ice business, which he is following at the present time. Mr. Ward purchased ten acres of land, most beautifully located, and on which he has erected a very substantial residence, surrounded with elegant shade trees, and extremely beautiful in appearance, and commanding in view. Here he intends making his permanent home, and has wisely chosen this beautiful spot on which to spend the remainder of his days. He married Miss Hannah McPhaden, of Williamsport, Penn., a most estimable lady, and by whom he has had three
whom he graduated in 1877. His system of teaching exceeds everything
holds a responsible position as clerk in the store of F.H. Miller; also Katie, a blooming young girl, and Hannah, the pride of the family. Personally Mr. Ward is mild, and unassuming, of sterling integrity, and is universally esteemed by all who know him. WILLLIAM WHITE, president of Holden college, was born in Toronto, Canada, in 1850. He was educated in his native country, and attended the Toronto University. He afterwards turned his attention to music, and placed himself under the instruction of E.A. Robbins, the celebrated artist of Boston, under yet presented. His object is to have thoroughness at every step. He
valuation was one million dollars. Mr. Young sold out his furniture
was married November 9, 1832, to Miss M.H. Smith. By this union they have had three children, one of whom is now living: Ethel A. GEORGE S. YOUNG, Holden, Missouri, was born in Middletown, Maryland, in January, 1840. He emigrated to Missouri in 1866, locating at Holden, where he has lived ever since. He was a carpenter and builder, which occupation he followed for a short time, and then went into the wholesale and retail furniture business, in which he engaged extensively, shipping to Fort Scott and other important points. At that time the county was almost a wilderness, the population not exceeding ten thousand, and the assessed
of his own state. By this union they have had seven children, three of
business in March, 1881, and was elected president of the Farmers' and Commercial bank, which position he declined, and accepted that of the vice-presidency of the bank. In 1876 he was elected a member of the board of education, and held the position continually until April, 1881, acquitting himself with great credit. He was elected a member of the council in 1868-70. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and also of the Presbyterian church. He has held a commission in, and represents that district in the grand lodge of Odd Fellows. He was married in Baltimore, Maryland, March 21, 1866, to Miss Estella V. Hyatt, a native whom are living: Daisie L., Blanche E. and John H. HENRY P. CARPENTER.
have had three children, two of whom are living: Reuben A., and
Among the enterprising business men of Holden, who was born in the state of New York, August 6, 1848, may be mentioned Mr. C. He left his native state and came to Missouri in 1869, stopping in Cass county, where he remained two years. Then he moved to Johnson county, locating at Pittsville, where he engaged in the mercantile business, which he followed successfully until 1880, when he come to Holden and engaged in the retail grocery trade. On the 1st day of January, 1882, he moved into an elegantly fitted up room in the New Block, where he is doing a fine business. He was married in 1873 to Miss Martha E. Fine, daughter of B.H. Fine, Esq., who came to Missouri in 1829. From this union they Frederick L. Lost one daughter four years old. MILTON T. ROBERSON;
with the firm of Morrison & Bro., holding this position for ten years.
of the firm of Smithson & Roberson, Holden. Was born in Boyle county, Kentucky, Sept. 28, 1845. He was reared in his native county. Entering Center College at the age of fourteen, pursued his studies until he was sixteen, when he entered the army, enlisting in the 4th Ky. U.S. troops and served twenty-one months, and was afterward transferred to the quarter-master's department, which position he held until the close of the war, after which he returned to his father's farm, where he remained until 1868, where he was married to Miss Mattie J. Bradshaw, daughter of Fredrick Bradshaw, Esq., of Kentucky. Mr. Roberson came to Missouri in 1869, and soon after located in Holden, where he accepted a clerkship In 1880 he formed a co-partnership with Mr. H.D. Smithson, under the
Holden, Missouri, and soon after engaged in the grain trade, in which he
firm name of Smithson & Roberson. These gentlemen are now running the leading dry goods store of Holden. Mr. R. is a prominent Mason and is at present worshipful master of the Holden Lodge No. 262. His family consists of three boys: Cormilus B., Frank B., and Emmet B. JOHN G. COPE, prominent among the business men of Holden, none are more worthy or have contributed more largely for the development of the Queen City, than the subject of this notice. Mr. Cope was born in Harrison county, Ohio, April 9th, 1838. His boyhood days were spent on his father's farm, receiving his primary education at the common school, after which he attended a select one. He then began his career as a teacher, which he followed successfully for a period of eight years. In 1869 he came to dealt largely, and continued until 1872, when he disposed of this and
then went to the Delaware College, Ohio, where he continued several
bought an interest in the Holden Bank, and shortly afterward became its cashier, which position he holds at present. He has served one term as member of the city council, and also member of the school board. In 1859 Mr. Cope was married to Miss Lizzie H. Cary of Wyandotte, Ohio, daughter of Geo. S. Cary, Esq. Mr. Cope has a large and substantial residence, beautiful grounds decorated with evergreens, and other shrubbery. His family consists of four children: Mary E., Frank C., Bertha E. and Charles. J.D. GUNTER, contractor and builder of the Holden College, is a native of Kentucky, born September 16, 1837, and principally raised in Ohio. He received a good English education; spending some time in pursuing his studies at the North University, Indianapolis, Indiana; quitting this school, he sessions; leaving this he went to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he learned the
but an infant in 1831. In 1860 he located at Holden, Mo., where he has
carpenter's trade and also acquired a good knowledge of architecture and building under the direction of Wm. Lilley. He then went south to New Orleans, where he carried on the carpenter and builder's business until the outbreak of the civil war. In 1868 he came to Sedalia, Missouri, where he remained until the following year, when he moved to Holden, Missouri. Since which time he has been actively engaged in contracting and building. His fine work being the best evidence of his skill. In 1866 he was married to Miss Permelia Hockensmith of Indianapolis, Indiana, daughter of Benjamin Hockensmith. R.L. BOLTON, physician. Prominent among the citizens of Holden is Dr. Bolton, who is a native of North Carolina, born Nov. 15th, 1830. After studying medicine he entered the Eclectic Medical School of Cincinnati, Ohio, where he graduated in 1861. He came to Missouri with his parents when
provost duty. On Oct. 5th, 1866, was mustered out and returned to Ohio,
been a resident since and where he has enjoyed a large practice. In 1865 he was married to Miss D. Bradley, daughter of R.D. Bradley, an old settler of this county. Socially the Dr. is a genial gentleman. B. F. METZLER, tradesman and speculator. Was born in Mahoning county, Ohio, June 23d, 1839. Received his first lessons at the common schools. When eighteen years of age he started to a graded school and then went to Iowa where he attended the Collegiate Institute in Delaware county, at which place he pursued his studies for some years. In 1862 he entered the army, enlisting in Co. K, 21st Iowa Infantry, and served until 1865, participating in the following battles: Vicksburg, Spanish Fort, Fort Blakely, and many other important engagements. Being mustered out at Baton Rouge he returned to Ohio and soon after was appointed 2d lieutenant of the 85th Colored Infantry of New Orleans, where they did
This file was contributed for use in the USGenWeb
and in the fall of the same year moved to Holden, Mo., where he has been a resident ever since. Mr. Metzler is secretary of the building committee of the Holden College. He was married August 31st, 1866, to Miss Minerva Williams, a native of Ohio, born in Licking county. They have five children: Charley O., Dora A., Eddie E., Lena and Clide. USGENWEB NOTICE: In keeping with our policy of providing free information on the Internet, data may be used by non-commercial entities, as long as this message remains on all copied material. These electronic pages may NOT be reproduced in any format for profit or for presentation by other persons or organizations. Persons or organizations desiring to use this material for purposes other than stated above must obtain the written consent of the file contributor.
Archives by: Bill Pennington

Source: "History of Johnson County, Missouri" by Ewing Cockrell, 1918

 Transcribed by  Karen Hammer -2009

MADISON TOWNSHIP.
Madison Township was one of the first four townships organized in the county and at that time consisted of nearly one-fourth of the area of the county, situated in the southwestern part. It was organized May 4, 1835. It was named for President James Madison.
Early Settlements.-The early settlers came from the east and penetrated the new and unsettled country, generally, from the Missouri river on the north, and few, if any, located south of the Blackwater prior to 1830. The Ferguson family were about the first to cross Blackwater and settle in what is now Madison township. Most of the early settlers lived north of the present site of Holden and a few located west of that point. They lived near the two branches of Pin Oak. Among the early settlers were: Samuel and Aaron Ferguson, James Bradley, William Davidson, Squire A. B. Hamilton. P. H. Ray, Archy Ray, and their father, High Ray, Moses Tapscott, August Demasters, Squire J. G. Doyle, Matthew Cummings, William Cummings, Sanford Cummings, Joseph Mason, John Windsor, Reuben Fox, John Utt, Thomas Tapscott, G. Hays, Joseph Christian, Jacob Sams, Jacob Beck, Charles S. Ferguson, Martin Ferguson, Pleasant R. Ferguson, Joseph Matthews, William Burden, Sr., and Jr., Eldridge Burden. George Conley, John Miller, William Miller, James Thompson, George Medlock, G. Cunningham, Barrett Duff, Squire Thompson, Williamson, G. K. Roberts and Doctor Roberts.

Up to 1868 Madison township retained all its original territory, which contained practically all of the present township of Kingsville and Rose Hill and a portion of Chilhowee. Early elections were held at the oldest settlement in the southwest part of the county in 1858. The following names appear on the poll books for the election held that year. Many are misspelled, but many will be recognized and their descendants are still living where their fathers did: James L. Chinn, Elijah Chinn, J. W. Smith, J. J. Armstrong, S. J. Reed, Peyton D. Huff, C. C. Wheeler, H. S. Barksdale, James H. McCarty. E. Hocketts, J. N. Mills, William M. Bruce, Ambrose England, H. H. Hale, Samuel Reed, James L. Wilson, D. W. Skaggs, B. F. Fisher, William Townsend. John V. McCarty, Squire Asburg, W. T. Roberts, William J. Townsend. William F. Long, William M. Harris, William C. Sharp, R. L. Jackson, Michael Baker, L. Jones. H. Isley, Philip Isley, Christy Gates, W. E. Temple-ton, John W. Ham. J. G. Hutson, Andrew Flinkle, Cary Elliott, Peter Campbell. Martin Burly, L. P. Lisk, James M. Moore, W. W. Ham, G.W. Stranger, John Hinkie, G. H. Barnett, B. Wooldridge, W. A. Campbell, Thomas Moore, S. A. Duncan, G. W. L. Bradley, J. S. Gilkey, William M. Tutt, R. S. Wooldridge, Edward Welch, T. L. Dye, James E. Summons, A. A. Doak, John M. Lurby, Joel P. Lowing, William Owsley, John A. Townsend, William Smith, D. B. Reavis, E. Doman, B. F. Lewis, R. L. England. R. L. Elder, Davis Owsley, E. Welch, Thomas Hinkie, John Howard, Andrew Worth, A. C. Umstadt, A. H. Boggs, Noah Crual, James Bones, P. H. Duncan, R. M. Anderson, W. F. Carpenter, Sidney Scott, B. F. Cross, James Hinkie. William Hutson, William Harlow, David Bradshaw, G. W. Vowill, James Fox. William H. Fruners, A. G. Fulton, J. F. R. Turner, R. H. Atkins, Samuel P. Rimsy, John H. Bailey, John B. Bailey, W. P. Day, B. S. Durrett, J. B. Pemberton, W. A. Givens, J. W. West, L. C. Camden, William Welch, Henry Stumpff, Matthew Cummins, E. T. Peyton, William Wiseman, John F. West, James D. Smith, George M. Strange, William G. King. Miles Bradshaw, W. L. Suart, Morris Hodges, R. L. Skillman, T. N.. Carpenter, G. H. Duncan, B. F. Umstadt, William Allen, John Umstadt, James G. Atkins, Adam Thomas, William Cummins, C. P. Smith, Josiah Holden, Martin Orr, S. W. Pemberton, J. A. Turner, John Hughes, D. M. Holden, Sanford Vineen, James Alexander, Brinkley Hornsby, John H. Priestly, G. A. Flowon, John A. Doak, George S. Hammon, Dennis Dunham, N. T. Doak, Jessie Coats, John Taggart, Alfred White, J. Cocke, J. C. Parsons, G. J. Farrensworth, W. D. Turner, Sanford Cummins, Porter Magor, J. B. Anderson; James Savage, Martin P. Foster, William P. Foster, William Hill, M. W. Fulton, John S. Graves, Benjamin Cross, D. S. W. Boston, J. G. Cocke, R. S. Gilliland, F. R. Jackson, John Enirson, G. B. Summons, C. H. Harris, A. G. Beard, M. P. Fisher, James Furgeson, W. J. Climont, William Hodges. John Orr, H. H. Dobyns, W. S. Wood, John C. Gilbert, F. M. Scott, J. S. B. Strange, W. P. Carrington, A. M. Potts, Samuel Smith, A. O. Faumhill, S. V. Turner, William H. Reese, James Corkran, J.C. Rogers, W. H. Anderson, Samuel Craig, Thomas Durrall, Thomas J. Jones, Isaac Jacobs, John W. Barsdale, George W. Gloyd, John Baker, John W. Tackitt, Daniel Gloyd, S. L. Smith, James A. Wilson, Cyrus Plouman, B. E. McVey, William Adams, Thomas A. Jennings, William P. Hulse, A. H. Stout, William T. Kennedy, William Burden. S. A. Scott, W. C. Duncan, William H. Camden, Selborn Naylor, David Davenport, Nathaniel Baker, A. J. Fulton, S. N. Copsland, William Payne, R. Z. R. Wall, William S. Hughes.

At this election John Baker and John H. Bailey were clerks. The judges were Dennis Dunham, Alfred White, N. T. Doak, and the justice of the peace was

Watson W. Ham.
Few of the early pioneers of Madison township are left to tell the story of the trials and hardships of the settlement and development of this section of the county. Squire John A. Doak, now residing in Holden, is one of the survivors of the early pioneers, and though he is eighty-three years old, he is still vigorous in mind and body and remembers well the early conditions seventy-five years ago. He came here with his parents from Lafayette county when he was eight years old, in 1842, and settled six miles south of where Holden now stands, on Bear creek. They were one of the first families to settle in that locality. The city of Holden was* then not even dreamed of. Lexington, forty-five miles distant, was the nearest trading point. There were no roads and travelers followed the trails which ran straight across the country, following the most accessible routes regardless of section lines. The trip to Lexington, which the settlers were required to make about twice each year, required about four days to complete. The settlements were all located along the streams. The timber which grew along the creeks afforded both fuel and building materials, as well as natural shelter. There were no luxuries, but much comfort and the standards of democracy and hospitality were high.
Early Churches.-The earliest church in the township was Rock Spring Cumberland Presbyterian church, which is still in existence. According to the old History of Johnson County, it was organized May 21, 1835, by Rev. R. D. Morrow. According to a very complete history of the church by Miss May Windsor, taken chiefly from the records, it was organized May 1, 1837, as the New Hope congregation, and in 1843 the name was changed to Rock Spring. It was the common place of worship for this neighborhood for many years before the Civil War. For full history, see article by Miss Windsor in the chapter on the -Cumberland Presbyterian church.
Round Grove Methodist Episcopal Church, South, was organized May 16, 1879 by Rev. S. P. Cobb. They worshipped in the Round Grove school house. The charter members were: J. D. Ellisten, Silas Elliston, V. K. Shepherd, J. P. Lowrey, F. Lowrey, D. P. Woodruff, O. W. Strange, V. Strange, C. L. Woolfolk, P. R. Ferguson, J. V. Tapscott, M. A. Tapscott, Sr., M. A. Tapscott, Jr., F. L. Tapscott.
Other early churches were in Holden town, and their early history is given under that of the town.
Early Schools.-One of the early schools was Round Grove. It was established before the Civil War. 1'hree generations of one family have attended this school, and of the last, one is now its teacher. Catherine Hayes, daughter of Mr. Hayes and Mary Ann (Cockrell) Hayes, was taught there by Thomas Murray. Her daughter, Ada, wife of John F. Baker, the stockman of Holden, went there, first to John Morrin, and Mrs. Baker's daughter, Catherine Baker, attended the same school under Charles Gauss and is now its teacher. The first building was of logs and located a mile west of the present location. It was moved after the Civil War. For other school information, see chapter on education.
Justices.-The following are the justices of the peace of the township as far back as the county court records show, with dates of their election: 1842, Leroy Duncan; 1844, Leroy Duncan, Peter Campbell, John Newton, John Umstadt; 1852, Dennis Dunham, Watson W. Ham, Peter Campbell, William Deshager; 1856, Watson W. Ham, William Deshager, Andrew A. Johnson, Martin C. Randleman; 1860, Silas Hulett, Watson W. Ham, F. C. Howerdin; 1864, Brinkley Hornsby; 1870, F. L. Hobson, B. A. Craine; 1878, R. M. Burriss, W. C. Smith; 1880, G. F. Carpenter; 1882, P. D. Brooks, G. F. Carpenter; 1886. J. H. Hawes, Joseph Potter, W. W. Gaunt; 1894, W. W. Gaunt, J. H. Hawes, J. W. C. Hulse; 1898, W. W. Gaunt, J. H. Hawes, J. W. Greenwood; 1902, W. W. Gaunt, John Skerlock, J. W. Greenwood; 1904, E. B. White, J. W. Greenwood; 1906, E. B. White, O. G. Boisseau; 1910, W. H. Zion, J. W. Greenwood, E. B. White; 1914, W. H. George. J. W. Greenwood, George S. Young.
County Officers.-The following are the county officers who have been elected from the township since 1882, with the dates of their election:
1882-G. W. Patton (Democrat), recorder.
1886-88-W. M. Hamilton (Democrat), assessor.
1890-Robert McLin (Democrat), representative.
1890-92-Andrew S. Campbell (Democrat), assessor.
1890-L. F. Murray (Democrat), coroner.
1894-Frank B. Fulkerson (Republican), prosecuting attorney. 1894-W. S. Dunham (Republican), sheriff. 1896-98-R. N. Horn (Democrat), coroner. 1898-R. H. Tatlow (Democrat), county judge. 1898-1900-George S. Young (Democrat), representative. 1904-06-P. L. Ferguson (Democrat), treasurer. 1908-1910-W. L. Chaney (Democrat), prosecuting attorney. 1912-Emory Thompson (Democrat), coroner. 1916-S. A. Murray (Democrat), coroner.
County Road Improvements.-County road improvements made by Madison township since this system was established in 1911 were, up to January, 1916, eleven in number, and aggregated $677 furnished by the citizens of the township, and $640 by the county.
Organizations.-The following is a complete list of all organizations of every kind in Madison township. Full details of each organization are in this book in separate chapters on the different organizations.
Churches-Baptist, Holden; Catholic, Holden; Christian, Holden, Cumberland Presbyterian, Rock Spring; Latter Day Saints, Holden; Methodist, Holden; Presbyterian, Holden; Methodist, Negro; African Methodist, Negro.
Fraternal Organizations-Eastern Star, Knights of Pythias, Maccabees, Masons, 266 Haggai chapter; Modern Woodmen, Odd Fellows; Rebekahs, Royal Neighbors, Woodmen of the World.
1917 War Organizations-Red Cross, Holden Branch; Home Guards.
Business Organizations-Bank of Holden, Farmers and Commercial Bank, First National Bank, Citizens Telephone Company, Home Telephone Company.
Miscellaneous-Civic Society, Woman's Christian Temperance Union, D. A. R., Benevolent Association, Shakespeare Club.
Total number of organizations in township is thirty.
HOLDEN
Location.-Holden is on the Missouri Pacific and the Missouri, Kansas & Texas railroads fifty miles from Kansas City.
Holden was built in anticipation of the Pacific railroad. Up to 1857, the present site of Holden was a wild, unbroken prairie, much still owned by the government. During that year the Pacific railroad had reached Jefferson City from the east and the preliminary survey had been made through this section. Isaac Jacobs thought the present site of Holden would be a favorable location for a town on the new railroad line. He accordingly purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land from the original patentee. Sometime after this purchase he associated with him Sanford Cummings and they laid off and platted the original town of Holden. The town was laid out in lots 72 by 144 feet in dimensions and offered for sale at fifty dollars each. A plat of the town was recorded April 27, 1858, by Isaac Jacobs.
Mr. Jacobs was enterprising and pushed the new town vigorously, and had a public sale of the lots. It was said that each lot was sold with a condition that no spirituous liquors should be made or sold upon the premises except for medicinal purposes, upon violation of which the lot was to be forfeited to the trustees of the town, by them sold and the proceeds applied to the support of the schools. Mr. Jacobs also agreed to expend in the. building up and improvement of the town all proceeds derived from the sale of lots. Over thirty lots were sold in one day at public auction for prices ranging from twenty-five to eighty dollars.
Holden was named in honor of Maj. N. B. Holden, who was prominent in the early-day affairs of Johnson county. He was a member of the Legislature and a prominent factor in bringing the Pacific railroad through Johnson county, and was identified with the early-day growth and development of Holden.
First Buildings.-In 1858 Jacobs and Cummings erected a small building on the corner of Second and Olive streets and here opened a general store. They next built a small store building on the corner of Lexington and Market streets. About the same time Dr. C. L. Carter bought two lots on Second and Olive streets and erected the first frame residence in Holden. The following winter, Joseph T. Mason and son built a hotel, which was destroyed by fire during the war. Horatio Cox built the first blacksmith shop the same year. In the spring of 1859 the first school house was built on First and Livingston streets. This school house was also used as a church for a number of years and William Roop, of the Protestant Methodist church, preached here. In the summer of 1859, H. W. and H. H. Mize erected a building and engaged in the general mercantile business. The first Masonic hall was over this store. W. C. Painter erected a blacksmith shop here in 1860, and Doctor Bolton erected an office in 1860 and began the practice of medicine here. However, Dr. C. L. Carter was the first practicing physician. James Bradley built the first brick building in the town, which was a one-story structure, in 1860. This was burned in the early part of the Civil War.
When the Civil War broke out the town had sixteen families, a population of about one hundred. During the Civil War some of the best buildings were burned and the town made no progress. In 1865 the railroad reached Holden and this, with the return of peace, gave the town new life. Soon a number of important business houses were established here. Hubbard and Coventry established an extensive dry goods business. H. C. Bettes opened a hardware store. W. J. Lee engaged in the dry goods business and James S. Peel and W. B. Nichols also engaged in business here. I. Starkey and William Christian established a lumber yard here, which at this writing is conducted by the son, C. E. Starkey. All these businesses were established in 1866. From that time on, Holden has made substantial progress.
Organization.-The first town organization of Holden was perfected in 1868. with the following officers: J. M. Hubbard, mayor; George L. Wells, J. O. Parish, Abe Metzler and J. C. Richards, councilmen; Ed. Steams, marshal; David Nation (husband of Carrie Nation), attorney, and J. W. Mack, clerk. The town was first incorporated in 1851 and the original charter was amended in 1873. Since the original town of Holden was platted several additions to the town have been officially recorded.
First Schools.-The first school building was erected shortly after the town was founded, in 1859. In 1867, the public school system of Holden was established on a firm basis. In 1870, a brick school house was erected containing four rooms but in a few years this was found too small and another building, a frame one, was erected. Since that time the school accommodations have kept pace with the requirements of the city and at present Holden has a modern high school building in addition to her grade schools and one school for the colored pupils.
A complete list of the early teachers who taught in the Holden schools from 1870 to 1881 are the following: Mr. S. H. Hatch, Mrs. E. J. Dudley, Miss M. H. Reed, Miss Kellogg, John A. Young, Sallie Brooks, Sallie Hubbard, M. H. Reed, Jennie Wise, Kate Humphreys, John H. Lea, M. K. Beatty, P. R. Carroll, Bettie Lewis, Sallie Hubbard, W. A. Smith, A. L. Clothier, Carrie Gloyd, Saidie Hubbard. George W. Sindlinger, Ida C. Clothier, Mary Brown, Julia McGrew. M. E. Lewis, M. C. Halbert, E. W. Stowell, M. E. Brown, Alice B. Cline, Anna E. Sharp, E. W. Stowell, Lizzie Hanishaw, Anna S. Carroll, George B. Longan, M. Brown, R. M. Cook, Eva Hengy, Mary C. Hank, Tillie Stephens, Mary Bobbs, Lutie Umstadt, W. D. Guttery, M. E. Hopkins, Anna P. Stark, A. C Jones, Maggie Sparks and Clara Wise.
Holden College was an important educational institution located in Holden for a number of years. It was established here in 1881 by Prof. W. White, a native of Canada, and of wide experience in college work. This college was successfully conducted for a number of years when the building was sold to an order of Catholic nuns and by them conducted under the name of St. Celia Seminary. After being conducted by this order for a number of years as a successful educational institution, the property passed into the hands of private ownership. Recently it has been purchased by the Latter Day Saints church and after elaborate improvements, it is now used as a home for aged members of that denomination.
First Postoffice.-The first postoffice in the vicinity of Holden was established here before the town was laid out. It was on the Jefferson-Independence stage route and kept by Isaac Jacobs. After Mr. Jacobs laid the town out and built a store here, the postoffice was moved to his store. The office remained there during the Civil War and Mr. Jacobs continued to serve as postmaster although very little mail was handled here during the war. In the spring of 1866, William Coventry, who started a store here, became postmaster. Two years later he was succeeded by T. J. Tygart, a real estate man, and in 1869 \Y. J. Alack became postmaster, and continued at least as long as 1881.
Early Cemetery.-For a number of years after Holden was built there was no regular cemetery laid out and established by law. The inhabitants buried their dead in what was known as the old burying ground, which is now occupied by the public school in the southern part of town.
The Holden cemetery was regularly laid out and platted by Luther Wagner, a civil engineer, and the plat recorded May 17, 1869, and at that time about one hundred and twenty-five graves were removed from the old burying ground to the new one. The new cemetery is under control and jurisdiction of the city of Holden and is located about one and one-fourth miles southwest of the Missouri Pacific depot and originally contained ten acres, but additions have since been made and a concrete sidewalk was built to it.
Early Churches.-The Methodist Episcopal church was organized by Rev. G. H. Reed in 1867. The erection of a church building was begun in 1869 and was completed and dedicated in August, 1871, by Rev. Doctor Dant. This was known as "Coventry" chapel. The first Sunday school was organized in connection with this denomination by Mrs. J. E. Gardner at her residence in 1869.
The Evangelical Association was organized at Holden in 1879 by Rey. Koepsell and Rev. Schaefer and a church edifice was erected the same year. The first members of this denomination here were William Kotch, Lizzie Kotch, Philip Ulrich, R. Ulrich. H. Hagemeyer, C. Hagemeyer, E. Henzy, J. Miller, Charles Hagemeyer, S. Hagemeyer, E. Scheer, F. and R. Witzell, F. Winkenhoeper, H. Rorman, M. Spath. R. Markley, J. Rorman. Among the early pastors of this denomination were Reverend Messrs. Falgeht, Emmell, Harter, Koepsell and Schafer. This congregation has since disbanded.
The first Baptist church was organized March 23, 1878, by C. N. Webster, and erected a building at the corner of Sixth and Market streets in 1879.
The first Christian church was organized here in 1865 by Elder Stout and erected a building shortly after the organization was effected.
The first Presbyterian church was organized November 4, 1866, by Rev. S. G. Clark.
St. Patricks Catholic church was organized by Father M. G. Alaskin in May, 1869, and a church erected the same year.
The Methodist Episcopal church (colored) was organized in 1874 by Rev. William Wheeler and reorganized in 1879 by Rev. R. Bush.
The African Methodist church (colored) was organized by the colored people in 1876 and two years later a church was built in the southern part of the town
by Rev. P. D. Yocum.
Banks.-The Bank of Holden was established May 15, 1872, by I. M. Smith and Louis Cheney. It is the oldest bank now in existence in the county.
The Farmers & Commercial Bank was organized March 17, 1881. William M. Steele was especially active in its early establishment.
Holden Today.-Today, Holden has six white and two negro churches, sixteen civic and fraternal organizations, city-owned waterworks, and light plant, a mill, three banks, two newspapers, first-class hotel, fine high school, good hospital and good streets, sidewalks and well-improved homes.
The time was when Holden and Warrensburg sought to become big towns. This ambition has developed into the higher one of becoming good towns. In this Holden is achieving rapid and substantial success. For many years it held the largest and most successful country fair in Johnson county, and one of the best in the state. The old fair grounds still testify to the size and importance of these big gatherings. Today Holden in its place has the largest and best Chautauqua Association in the county. It not only has a fine high school building and equipment, but in that school is organized a cadet company, active and efficient, that is giving the students a practical and moral training they get nowhere else, and this company is supported wholly by the voluntary work of the superintendent-Professor Robeson-and school board and students. In many other ways, the strong and valuable community spirit of Holden has produced, and is today producing, in peace and in the great war, results that make the world a better place for the men and women who live in it.
City Officers.-The following is a complete list of the officers of Holden from its organization to the present time:
Mayors.-1868, J. M. Hubbard; 1869, J. C. Richards, W. G. Finley; 1870, Geo. S. Walton; 1871. J. W. Mack; 1872, F. B. Hawes; 1873, W. B. Nichols; 1874-1877, W. C. Smith; 1878, M. A. Powell; 1879-1880, W. C. Smith; 1881, A. Van Matre; 1882. B. F. Metzler; 1883-1884, J. W. Kyger; 1885-1889, J. H. Hawes; 1890-1891, G. S. Young; 1892-1893, J. H. Hawes; 1893, F. C Borden; 1894-95, J. H. Hawes; 1896-1899, T. J. Halsey; 1898-1899, J. Z. Brothers; 1901-1903. W. D. Gray; 1904-1909, O. G. Boisseau; 1910-1913. W. G. Thompson: 1914-1917, Emery G. Thompson.
Councilmen.-1868, George L. Wells. J. O. Parish, Abe Metzler, J. C. Richards; 1869, I. Starkey, J. F. Tygard, George Young, John Ellis; 1870. Charles Bluhm, J. Wallace, James McMullin. John Ellis; 1871, W. C. Smith, G. S. Young, Edward Davis. William Hill; 1872, I. Nichols, J. C. Richards. I. Starkey, J. G. Cope; 1873, J. G. Cope, R. T. Leaverton, I. Starkey. W. C. Taylor: 1874. M. V. Johnson, T. M. Mills. I. Starkey, John Ormsby: 1875, M. V. Johnson, J. Ormsby, H. C. Conner, I. Starkey; 1876, M. V. Johnson, J. Ormsby, H. C. Conner, S. S. Metzler: 1877. M. V. Johnson. J. Ormsby. H. C. Conner, S. S. Metzler; 1878, M. V. Johnson, J. H. Ormsby, S. S. Metzler, H. C. Conner; 1879. I. Starkey, J. H. Ormsby. John Gibson. H. C. Conner: 1880, I. Starkey, J. H. Ormsby; John Gibson, H. C. Conner; 1881, I. Starkey, J. H. Ormsby, H. C. Conner. John Gibson: 1882. I. Starkey. J. H. Ormsby, H. C. Conner, John Gibson; 1883. H. C. Conner, J. H. Ormsby, John Gibson. M. T. Robinson; 1884, J. W. Scott. J. H. Ormsby, John Gibson, M. T. Robinson; 1885, J. W. Scott, J. M. Taylor, J. H. Blewitt, W. P. Baker; 1886, E. P. Tompkins, J. M. Taylor, H. M. Garnett, W. P. Baker, Joseph Huber; 1887, Joseph Huber. J. M. Taylor, C. W. Etter, T. A. Hoffman ; 1888, Joseph Huber, J. M. Taylor. T. J. Wolf, C. W. Etter, W. P. Baker; 1889, Joseph Huber, J. V. Murray, C. W. Etter, W. P. Baker; 1890, J. F. Rittner, J. V. Murray, C. W. Etter, T. J. Wolf; 1891, J. F. Rittner, J. V. Murray, W. P. Baker, T. J. Wolf; 1892, J. L. Burris, J. V. Murray, W. P. Baker, G. S. Young: 1893, O. A. Bettes, Lon Hank, J. F. Rittner, G. S. Young; 1894, O. A. Bettes, Lon Hank. J. F. Rittner, J. C. Stalzner; 1896, J. Z. Brothers, Lon Hank, J. F. Rittner, Marion Grubb, J. W. Page. W. F. Shields, C. H. Hartzell. J. H. Ormsby: 1897, J. Brothers, Lon Hank, J. F. Rittner. C. H. Hartzell, B. Stern, W. F. Shields. T. McMullen, J. W. Page; 1898, B. Stern, W. F. Shields. F. A. Tesch, G. C. Scheer. J. H. Smith. Lon Hank. J. S. Arnold. J. W. Page; 1899. J. S. Phillips, Lon Hank. J. S. Arnold. G. C. Scheer, W. D. Gray, H. S. Gooch, Charles Bluhm, J. W. Page; 1900, J. S. Phillips, Lon Hank, Charles Bluhm, G. C. Scheer, W. D. Gray, H. S. Gooch, F.A. Tesch, I. Roby; 1901, J. S. Phillips, Lon Hank, Charles Bluhm, G.C. Scheer, W. D. Gray, H. S. Gooch, F. A. Tesch, I. Roby; 1902, J. S. Phillips, Lon Hank, Charles Bluhm, G. C. Scheer, W. D. Gray, H. S. Gooch, F. A. Tesch, R. D. Bailey; 1903, Harry Hebel, Lon Hank, F. A. Tesch, G. C. Scheer, Charles Gibson, C. M. Baldwin, Charles Bluhm, I. Roby; 1904, Harry Hebel. Lon Hank, F. A. Tesch, H. W. Higgins, J. W. Pierce. C. M. Baldwin, Charles Bluhm. W. A. Caldwell; 1905, Harry Hebel, Lon Hank, F. A. Tesch, Brad Harmon. J. W. Pierce, C. M. Baldwin, Charles Bluhm. W. A. Caldwell; 1906. Harry Hebel, Lon Hank, F. A. Tesch. W. A. Caldwell. W. D. Gray, C. M. Baldwin, Charles Bluhm, Joseph Riley: 1907. Harry Hebel. Lon Hank, F. A. Tesch, W. A. Caldwell, W. D. Gray. C. M. Baldwin, Charles Bluhm. Joseph Riley. H. E. Tesch; 1908, Harry Hebel. Lon Hank, H. E. Tesch. Joseph Riley, Joseph Rowell, C. M. Baldwin, Charles Bluhm, E. H. Golladay; 1909, L. L. Bierly. Lon Hank, H. E. Tesch. J. W. Riley, G. B. Kirk. C. M. Baldwin, Charles Bluhm. E. H. Golladay; 1910, L. L. Bierly, Lon Hank, F. R. Huber. J. W. Riley, G. B. Kirk, C. M. Baldwin, Charles Bluhm, E. H. Golladay: 1911. R. W. Conrad, Lon Hank. F. R. Huber, J. W. Riley. G. B. Kirk. Brad Harmon, O. W. White, E. H. Golladay; 1912, R. W. Conrad, Lon Hank, F. R. Huber, J. W. Riley, Dr. E. Thompson, Brad Harmon, O. W. White, E. H. Golladay; 1913, R. W. Conrad. Lon Hank, H. E. Tesch, E. H. Golladay, E. Thompson, E. K. Steele. A. G. Anderson. F. R. Huber: 1914, R. W. Conrad, Lon Hank, H. E. Tesch, E. H. Golladay, G. B. Raker, E. K. Steele, A. G. Anderson, J. F. Baker: 1915. R. W. Conrad, Lon Hank, H. E. Tesch, E. FT. Golladay. G. B. Raker. E. K. Steele, A. G. Anderson. J. F. Baker. Dr. A. B. Newland to succeed Tesch: 1916. R. W. Conrad, Lon Flank, O. G. Boisseau. E. H. Golladay. W. A. Caldwell, E. K. Steele. O. W. White. J. F. Baker: 1917, W. A. Caldwell. Lon Hank. O. G. Boisseau. E. H. Golladay, George Bleich, E. K. Steele, Dr. O. J. Phillips, J. F. Baker.
Lon Hank has served twenty-five years consecutively on the city council, from April, 1893. This is the longest service of any elected city or county officers, and he was elected by the people more times than any other city or county officer. City elections in Holden are non-partisan.
Attorneys.-1868, D. Nation; 1869, D. Nation: 1870, D. Nation; 1871-72, A. Van Matre; 1873, J. P. Orr; 1874, J. E. Johnston; 1875-78, J. P. Orr: 1879, A. Van Matre; 1881, A. H. Carpenter; 1884, S. T. Allen; 1886, Joseph January; 1887, R. O. McLin: 1888. A. Van Matre; 1889-1890, R. O. McLin; 1891-94, J. H. January; 1895, C. C. Christian; 1896. F. B. Fulkerson and D. T. Boisseau; 1897-98, D. T. Boisseau; 1900, T. C. Hornbuckle: 1902, J. P. Orr; 1904, M. D. Aber; 1905-08, W. L. Chaney; 1909, H. A. Schoenwetter; 1910. J. P. Orr; 1912, H. A. Schoenwetter; 1914. S. T. White.
Clerks.-1868, J. W. Mack: 1869. David Nation: 1870, A. P. Espenscheid: 1871, H. Martin Williams: 1872. J. H. Hawes; 1873, George N. Richards; 1874, J. H. Hawes; 1875-76, George Patton; 1877-79. John W. Mittong; 1880, James Steele: 1881, J. H. Hawes; 1882, R. L. Narron; 1883-84, John M. Taylor: 1885-87. P. C. Van Matre; 1889, W. G. Braddy; 1890, G. R. Johnson: 1893, J. H. Tevis: 1894-1917. Jesse Bower.
Marshals.-1868. Edward Steams; 1869. B. F. Metzler: 1870, J. F. Power; 1871. T. Sharp: 1872, T. Dudley: 1873, A. B. Sparks: 1874, H. D. Smithson; 1875, J. M. Duke; 1876, E. A. Lucas: 1877-1881, H. H. Still; 1882, T. H. Moore; 1883-85, H. H. Still; 1886. Joe Hessler: 1887, H. H. Still; 1888-1890, D. S. Child: 1891-94. W. S. Dunham: 1895, James H. Nay; 1896, H. H. Still: 1898-1909, H. H. Roop; 1910, L. W. Grimes; 1912, H. E. Burton; 1914-16. L. W. Grimes.
Treasurers.-1871-72. D. Golladay: 1873, E. R. Stevens; 1874-1881, George V. Hall; 1881, George V. Hall, died April 26, 1881. and David Golladay elected to fill vacancy; 1883-1891. Z. T. Miller; 1896. G. R. Johnson; 1898-1902, D. L. Eves; 1904-1906. G. C. Batsell; 1908-1916, C. E. Starkey.
Street Commissioners.-1880, R. A. Snead: 1881-1884, D. J. Harlan; 1886-1890, John Wallace; 1892. Richard Watson: 1893, J. Wallace: 1894, R. Watson; 1899, A. C. Hartman; 1900-1903, B. F.. Elliott; 1904-1909. J. M. Haggard;" 1910-1911, L. W. Grimes; 1912-1913, H. E. Burton: 1914-1917, L. W. Grimes.
Police Judges.-1896-1909, J. W. Greenwood; 1910, E. B. White; 1912-1917. J. W. Greenwood.
Assessors.-1896, W. L. Christian: 1898-1904, O. C. Byler; 1905-1906, J. A. Wilkerson: 1908, O. C. Byler; 1910-1912. Thomas N. Crib-bins; 1916, O. C. Byler; 1917, George F. Mullen.
Collectors.-1896. G. W. Estes; 1897, A. M. Sankey; 1898-1902, C. E. Starkey; 1904-1917, Jesse Bower.
BACK
Johnson County, Missouri Genealogy Trails
 © 2006 - 2008 by Genealogy Trails  -  All Rights Reserved - With full rights reserved for original submitters. 


Place name:Holden
Description:In the southwestern part of Madison Township; laid out in 1857 by Isaac Jacobs and Sanford Cummings and named for Major W.B. Holden, a member of the legislature, instrumental in bringing the Missouri Pacific Railroad through the country. Mr. Holden was a native of New York. He settled in Johnson County in 1839. (O.G. Boisseau; HIST. JOHNSON 1881, 451)
Source:Johnson, Bernice E. "Place Names In Six Of The West Central Counties Of Missouri." M.A. thesis., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1933.
AUGUST 2-8, 1864. -- Civil War Operations near Holden, Mo., with skirmish (8th) on Norris Creek. Report of Capt. Melville U. FOSTER, Seventh Missouri State Militia Cavalry. August 6, Corporal SKIDMORE, with twenty men, Company G, went to Lost Creek; returned; traveled twenty miles. August 8, Lieutenant Combs, with forage train, run into a squad of bushwhackers in Norris Creek; had skirmish; had 1 horse slightly wounded.
August 11-19, 1864. -- Civil War Operations in Johnson County, Mo., with skirmish (12th) near Holden. Report of Capt. Melville U. FOSTER, Seventh Missouri State Militia Cavalry. August 16, took Lieutenant MARR and thirty men; went to Norris Creek; found nobody; went to Honey Creek; saw three bushwhackers; ran them out of their huts. Returned on the 19th; traveled seventy miles. Same day Captain BAKER and Lieutenant Combs, with thirty men, drove Panther and Walnut Creeks; traveled thirty miles. August 17, Lieutenant PHARIS, with twenty-five men, was sent in pursuit of the gang that burned the stage. Could not find them. Returned on the 18th; traveled forty miles.
AUGUST 22-30, 1864. -- Operations in La Fayette County, Mo. Report of Capt. Melville U. FOSTER, Seventh Missouri State Militia Cavalry. Civil War HOLDEN, MO., August 31, 1864. I have the honor to report marches, scouts, &c., of my command: August 22, took Lieutenant PHARIS and thirty men of both companies and arrested the families of DURRETT, STONER, COWARDEN, and SCOTT, for feeding bushwhackers; returned same day; traveled thirty miles. August 24, Lieutenants PHARIS and MARR, with forty men of both companies, escorted prisoners to Warrensburg; returned next day; traveled thirty miles. Same day Lieutenant Combs, with thirty-five men, escorted Paymaster MEARS to Chapel Hill, Missouri; traveled thirty miles. August 267 took thirty-five men of both companies, in obedience to telegram from district headquarters; proceeded to Big Creek to co-operate with Captain QUEEN, from Warrensburg, Missouri; drove Walnut Creek; jumped three bushwhackers; drew blood, but got no one.


The Sedalia weekly bazoo., April 27, 1886
New Telephone Line (Holden, Missouri)
Warrensburg and Holden come to the front with 14,000 company.
2012 Holden, Missouri
2012 Holden, Missouri
2012 Holden, Missouri
2012 Holden, Missouri
2012 Holden, Missouri
2012 Holden, Missouri
2012 Holden, Missouri
2012 Holden, Missouri
2012 Holden, Missouri
2012 Holden, Missouri
2012 Holden, Missouri
2012 Holden, Missouri
2012 Holden, Missouri

Dr. Charles Leonidas Carter was born March 1, 1832 at Smith’s Crossroad (now Dayton), Rhea County, Tennessee.   He moved to Missouri in 1851 taking a position as Assistant County Assessor in Cass County, Missouri where his uncle Joseph H. Carter was the County Assessor.  Charles attended the St. Louis Medical College and upon graduating first practiced medicine at Pleasant Hill, Cass County. He moved to Holden, Johnson County, Missouri about 1858 where he built the first dwelling in Holden in addition to a physician’s office. His mother Ruth McFarland Carter was living with him at the start of the Civil War. His brother, William Landon Carter also of Holden, took Ruth to Pike County, Illinois where she would be cared for the duration of the war. On April 1, 1863 Charles enlisted with the 6th Missouri State Militia as Asst. Surgeon after passing the army examination twenty-four points higher than the regulation required. In nine months he was promoted and put in charge of Branch B of Clay General Hospital at Louisville, Kentucky.  Shortly afterwards he was called to the front and put in charge of the sick and wounded of the 17th Army Corps at Marietta, Georgia.  On Oct 4, 1863 he was captured and held until the next morning but attended to the enemy’s wounded men until he was released.  At the fall of Atlanta, Charles was sent there, but due to failing health, he resigned in November of 1864 and returned to Holden.



William Landon Carter was born March 20, 1835 at Smith’s Crossroad (now Dayton), Rhea County, TN and moved to Missouri with his widowed mother in 1852.   At the start of the Civil War he took his mother,Ruth McFarland Carter to Pike County, Illinois where she would be cared for during his absence.  He then enlisted in the Union Army in Pike County. The Adjutant Generals Report shows William L. Carter from Milton starting out as a Sergeant in Co. I, 99th Illinois Infantry.  He was immediately promoted to Sergeant Major.  When the Regiment was consolidated, he was retained as Sgt Major and then promoted to 2nd Lieutenant of Co. C 99th Consolidated Illinois Infantry.  He mustered as a 2nd Lt. on Feb 15, 1865 and mustered out on July 31, 1865.


Latour Train Depot - Missouri

Latour, Missouri Passenger Train Station

Identifier: p01178
Title: 
Latour, Missouri Depot
Creator: 
Howard D. Killam
Description: 
The railroad depot at Latour, Missouri, used by the St. Louis-San Francisco Railway CompanyLatour…was laid out when the St. Louis & San Francisco R.R., was built in 1885.
County: 
Johnson
Division:
 Eastern
Subdivision: Clinton
Branch: 
Clinton
Station: 
D60
Freight: 
479
Milepost: 
59.6 miles from Kansas City
Date Original: 
April 6, 1957
Source: 
3.5 x 5 inch black and white photograph
Quick City, Missouri Passenger Train built 1884


photograph