Old No.152 Missouri Pacific RR

Old No.152 Missouri Pacific RR
Old No.152 Missouri Pacific Engine That Would Come to Warrensburg

WHS Class of 73

Search This Blog

January 2, 2017

1799 Major James N. Warnick Born - Mormon Wars - Home Guard - Osage Indians

1895 Book Link
Major James N. Warnick
a late prominent citizen of Warrensburg, Missouri, was one of the most distinguished of the early pioneers of Johnson county. He was born August 2, 1799 in Tennessee and in that state was reared to maturity. November 13, 1823, he was united in marriage with Siny P. Payton, daughter of John Payton, of Wilson county, Tennessee. They came to Missouri in May, 1833 and located temporarily in Lexington. In the autumn of the same year, Mr. and Mrs. James N. Warnick came to Johnson county, where they settled on a large tract of land in Post Oak township. When the Warnick family settled in Johnson county, it was the period of Indian depredations. Within a very brief period after their coming, the militia was called out to protect the settlers from murderous bands of Osage Indians, who were committing atrocities among the outlying settlements. James N. Warnick was a born leader of men and as captain of the home guard, heading one of the companies of militia, drove back the savages to their reservation. He later distinguished himself further during the Mormon trouble. 
At this time, he received his title as major, when his regiment was organized under the state militia laws and he was elected to that position in the army. Major Warnick used to relate his experiences in "going to mill," which was considered a great pleasure in the early days. When the corn had ripened, all the settlers were gathered in and a sort of party was held, known as a "husking bee," when the corn would be husked after which the women would prepare a splendid supper and the fun and frolic would begin. The corn was shelled on rainy days and in the evenings. Even the children could help with this work and enjoyed making cob houses while the older ones raised blisters on their thumbs shelling corn. When a grist of corn was ready, it was placed in a sack thrown across the horse's back and taken to the mill many miles away. This meant a twenty to forty-mile trip, for the mill on Grand river was twenty miles distant and the mill at Lexington was forty miles away, so the man, or boy, who went with the corn always planned to wait at the mill from one to three days before he could get his corn ground. There was always a large number of men and boys at the mill waiting for their grists and, as one saw very few visitors in those days, it was a treat to hear the other men and boys tell stories, while they were waiting. 
Missouri Mormon Wars
To Major James N. and Siny P. (Payton) Warnick were born eight children: Robert N., who married Amanda J. Oglesby and to them were born Sanford Francis and E. N. Warnick, the former the father of Oscar D. Warnick, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this volume, and Mrs. Theodore Shock, of Warrensburg, Missouri, and the latter, a prominent merchant of Warrensburg, Missouri; Nancy Elizabeth; John P.; William S. ; Margaret F. ; Matilda Jane; James H. ; and Siny E. In 1882, there were one hundred descendants of James H. and Siny P. Warnick living in Johnson county, all of whom were highly respected men and women. There is perhaps no family in Johnson county which has exerted so great influence for good as has the Warnick family. Major and Mrs. Warnick were worthy and consistent members of the Cumberland Presbyterian church and ever gave their most earnest support to all causes having for their object the betterment of the community. The first Sunday school was organized in 1849 by Rev. Samuel King, who was superintendent. Maj. James Warnick assisted in the school. It was taught in a little log school house near the site of Shiloh church.
The Shiloh Cumberland Presbyterian church was the first church in the township. It was organized by Rev. R. D. King in 1836. Their first building was erected in 1875, and dedicated by the Rev. J. H. Houx. Some of the pioneer pastors of this denomination here were. Reverends W. Compton, B. F. Thomas. H. R. Smith. J. R. Whitsett, G. V. Ridley, S. Finis King and the first elders were James Harris, John Foster, Robert Thompson, Abner Stewart and R. M. King.
POST OAK TOWNSHIP
Post Oak township was organized February 14, 1849, off of the south end of Warrensburg township. It was named from Post Oak creek, which received its name from the abundance of post oak timber adjoining the creek.
Geography.-Area, about 69 square miles, or 44,160 acres. Geographically. Post Oak township composes the upland between Post Oak creek and its tributaries on the west and Clear Fork on the east, both these streams heading in a water shed running east and west across the south end of the township. The M. K. & T. and Rock Island railroads occupy this water shed, and Leeton and Post Oak towns are situated on it.
Early Settlements.-The earliest settlement in this township was probably in 1830. James Harris and his son, John M. Harris, came here that year from Tennessee. Reverends Samuel King and R. D. King also settled here in 1830. Maj. James Warnick, one of the sturdy, substantial pioneers of the county, came here from Tennessee in 1833.
Major Warnick Gravesite Link
Birth: Aug. 2, 1799
Davidson County, Tennessee, USA
Death: Sep. 9, 1883 Warrensburg, Johnson County, Missouri, USA
Married Sina Peyton on November 13, 1823 in Wilson County, Tennessee.
Family links:
Spouse: Sinna Lavina Peyton Warnick (1806 - 1877)
Children:
Robert Newton Warnick (1824 - 1895)*
John Peyton Warnick (1830 - 1913)*
William Smith Warnick (1832 - 1913)*
Margarett Frances Warnick Estes (1835 - 1916)*
James Harvey Warnick (1837 - 1926)*
Sina E. Warnick Mack (1848 - 1899)*
*Calculated relationship

Major James Warnick, Inscription: Aged 84y 1m 7d

Burial: Mount Zion Cemetery Warrensburg Johnson County Missouri, USA
Post Oak Township, 6 miles South of Warrensburg on Highway 13, Section 24, Township 45 North, Range 26 West

WARNICK
Bettie Joe, 1868 -1889
C. Frank, 1877 -1907
Corrie L., 1871 -1890
D. Breffith, 1881 -1903
George W., 1885 -1916, died in France
Golda M., 1913 -1914, daughter of T. S. and M. E.
Major James, died September 9, 1883 age 84 years 1 month, 7 days
James D., 1875 -1899
James H., 1837 -1926
Jane N. Harris, July 24, 1837 -February 3, 1926, wife of John P.

John P., August 7, 1830 -January 10, 1913
Nancy Wallace, 1844 -1894
Robert, died May 5, 1877 age 18 years 9 months, 28 days, son of J. P.
and N. J.Sinna P., died December 28, 1877 age 71 years, 4 months, 27 days, wife of Major James Warnick
Sterling W., 1879 -1898
Thomas W., August 25, 1873 -September 2, 1875


Mt. Zion Cemetery

Mt. Zion Cumberland Presbyterian Church
In Post Oak Township near the Chalybeate spring, erected after the Civil War. A Bible name 2 Samuel 5:7, a part of Jerusalem.
POST OAK TOWNSHIP.

Post Oak township was organized February 14, 1849, off of the south end of Warrensburg township. It was named from Post Oak creek, which received its name from the abundance of post oak timber adjoining the creek.
Geography.-Area, about 69 square miles, or 44,160 acres. Geographically. Post Oak township composes the upland between Post Oak creek and its tributaries on the west and Clear Fork on the east, both these streams heading in a water shed running east and west across the south end of the township. The M. K. & T. and Rock Island railroads occupy this water shed, and Leeton and Post Oak towns are situated on it.
Early Settlements.-The earliest settlement in this township was probably in 1830. James Harris and his son, John M. Harris, came here that year from Tennessee. Reverends Samuel King and R. D. King also settled here in 1830. Maj. James Warnick, one of the sturdy, substantial pioneers of the county, came here from Tennessee in 1833. (Refer to his family history for a full sketch.) Robert Thompson settled here in 1832. Abner Stewart, John Marr and Daniel Marr settled here in 1834. Samuel Evans, a Kentuckian, came in 1837. B. F. Wall came from North Carolina in 1839 and became a well-to-do farmer. Other old settlers who located in this township prior to 1840, or during that year, were, Thomas Irwin. Thomas J. Young, S. Stone, Samuel Houston, Edward Nichols, Philip Stone, John Stone, William Strong, Joseph Stewart. B. F. Thomas, J. L. Glazebrook. John Marr, Alman Marr, Owen Cooper, James Hackler, Thomas lams, James Boone, Col. William Johnson, Addison McSpadden and Frank Dwyer.
Mills.-When Post Oak township was first settled, the nearest mill was at Lexington, forty miles to the north. A trip there frequently required a week to complete, as the patrons of those pioneer mills were sometimes required to wait one to three days to get their grinding done. Booneville, about sixty-five miles distant on the Missouri river, was the nearest general trading point.
Early Churches.-The early day circuit riders visited the pioneers in this section about the time the settlement became permanent and services were usually held in their homes.
In the fall of 1853, the first camp meeting was held by Rev. Samuel King and R. D. King, of the Cumberland Presbyterian church, in the grove near the residence of Rev. Samuel King.
The first Sunday school was organized in 1849 by Rev. Samuel King, who was superintendent. Maj. James Warnick assisted in the school. It was taught in a little log school house near the site of Shiloh church.
The Shiloh Cumberland Presbyterian church was the first church in the township. It was organized by Rev. R. D. King in 1836. Their first building was erected in 1875, and dedicated by the Rev. J. H. Houx. Some of the pioneer pastors of this denomination here were. Reverends W. Compton, B. F. Thomas. H. R. Smith. J. R. Whitsett, G. V. Ridley, S. Finis King and the first elders were James Harris, John Foster, Robert Thompson, Abner Stewart and R. M. King.
Providence Baptist church was organized in April. 1846, by. Elder William P. C. Caldwell. Pioneer pastors of this denomination here were Reverends W. P. C. Caldwell, David VV. Johnson, Amos Horn, C. F. Floyd, William Lauder, L. M. Horn, Israel Thompson. A. M. Cockrell and John S. Denton. Some of the early members were Samuel and Anna Evans, Benjamin and Melinda Childers. William B. and Sina Compton, Louis and Sarah McComb and Andrew J. Bell. The first building used by this organization was a union church building known as Shiloh, which was located eleven miles south and one and one-half miles west of Warrensburg.
The Methodist Episcopal Church, South, was organized about 1853 at Cornelia, by Rev. Warren Pettis. Among the early members were Daniel and Charity Coal, James, Elizabeth and Mebina Hackler, Lucy Taylor, Doctor Love. Cornelia Love, Mark and Charlotte Shumate.
Mount Zion Cumberland Presbyterian church was organized and erected a house of worship after the close of the Civil War. Rev. J. H. Houx preached here for a time. Among the early members were Robert N. Warnick, David Marr, Dr. Lee D. Ewing. John P. Warnick and Julius Woodford.

The German Baptist or Dunkard church of Post Oak township was organized January 25, 1869. Their first church building was completed in 1871. The first members were John J. Harshey, Catherine Harshey, S. S. Mohler, Mary A. Mohler. D. M. Mohler, May Mohler, E. Mohler, Anna Mohler, Samuel Fulker and May Fulker. Elder John J. Harshey was the first minister.
The Christian church was organized in April. 1872, by M. D. Todd, an evangelist, and a substantial frame building was erected the same year about one-half mile east of Cornelia. Dr. J. M. Ward contributed about half of the funds necessary for this building. The following named ministers preached here in the early history of this organization: Elder Hurley. George W. Logan. Benjamin F. Stephens and F. E. Meigs. Some of the original members were A. Louney and family, Allen Jones and wife, John Burnett and wife. Dr. J. M. Ward, Woodson Reavis and wife, William Wiley. William Blakey and wife and John Daugherty and wife.
Harmony Baptist church of Post Oak was organized in 1881 by Rev. A. M. Cockrell. A suitable church building was erected the same year. There were thirty-five original members of this church. This congregation was an offspring of old High Point church in Jefferson township.
Early Cemeteries.-Among the old cemeteries of the township, Shiloh cemetery, was laid out in 1840 and an infant child of James Stewart was buried there the same year. Here also rest the remains of Rev. Samuel King, one of the founders of the Cumberland Presbyterian church. Cornelia cemetery was an old one. The Dunkard cemetery, in section 21. township 44, range 25, was started in 1869. The first burial was that of a child of an emigrant family who were passing through here. Snelling cemetery was established about 1841. Greer cemetery was an early-day burying ground, as was also Mount Zion. Wall cemetery and Greenlee cemetery were family burial grounds and there were a number of other private burial places throughout the township. The first burial occurred in the township in 1837.
Early Schools.-A man named Baker taught the first school in this township in 1835. He was followed by Alexander Marr. Other pioneer teachers of that period were Salathiel Stone, Mr. Macklin, Mr. Townsley, J. M. Ward, Ben Thomas and Miss Mary Cull.
Among the early district schools were Bryson, Cornelia, Culley, Divers, Grinstead. Holmes, Marr, Thomas, Warnick and Washington. The following are some of the early teachers after the Civil War: John Farney. Mrs. M. J. Brownlee, William Warnick, Benjamin Woodford. Lula Caldwell, B. F. Pettis, J. W. McGiven, Parma Wash, Cora Wash, Nannie Holmes, Kate Lawler, Jerome Mohler, Silas P. Cully, A. J. Sparks, Miss Jones, Cora Wall.
Early Post offices. Cornelia was the first village and postoffice in the township. James K. Farr and James Morrow built the first houses here in 1853. The town was located in section 36. about eight miles south of Warrensburg. It was named by Dr. Love in honor of his wife who bore the name Cornelia. In the Civil War it was practically burned to the ground by Bill Stewart and his gang. This village was also known by the early settlers as Shanghai and is said to have been so called from the fact that Dr. Love, who lived here, was a chicken fancier and quite extensively engaged in raising a breed of chickens known as Shanghais. Cornelia was a post office long before the Civil War and remained one until establishment of rural routes. There have usually been there also a grocery store, blacksmith shop, a public school and two churches.
Post Oak post office was established in 1855, about five miles south of Cornelia on what was known as the Warrensburg and Clinton mail route. N. M. Irwin was first postmaster. This town is on the lines of the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific and the Missouri, Kansas & Texas railroads, which were afterwards built through here, and now has store, blacksmith shop, school house and several residences.
Aubrey post office was established in the northeast part of the township in 1875 and J. N. Herring was the postmaster. Stone post office, named for that prominent family, also gave service for a while.
Justices.-The following are the justices of the peace of the township as far back as the county records show, with dates of their election: 1852, John Oliphant, Thomas McSpadden, Thomas lams, Richard M. King; 1856, John Oliphant, Thomas lams, Robert Thompson, Salathiel Stone; 1860, John Oliphant, Thomas lams, Robert Thompson, P. C. Thornton; 1862, Thomas lams; 1870, John G. Gray, George M. Roberts; 1878, R. W. Warnick, Owen Cooper; 1882. R. W. Warnick, George Hippie: 1886, John E. Williams, Walter L. Stone; 1890, Adam Tustison, Walter Stone; 1894, Thomas C. Marlatt 1898, James C. Burks, Robert Smaltz; 1900, J. R. Grinstead; 1902, J. R. Grinstead: 1904, J. W. Marshall; 1906, J. M. Lowery, F. W. Sweeney; 1908, Alonzo Hunt, John Sheller; 1910, S. B. Sturgis, C. F. Gilchrist; 1914. S.. B. Sturgis, J. W. Shoemaker.
County Officers.-The following are the county officers who have been elected from the township since 1882, with the dates of their election:
1890-Robert N. Warnick (Democrat), probate judge.
1896-1898-Robert M. Lear (Democrat), sheriff.
1896-1898-William H. Buford (Democrat), county judge.
1902-1906-William A. Stephens (Democrat), presiding county judge.
1906-1910-J. R. Grinstead (Democrat), county clerk.
1908-1912-David Mohler (Democrat), surveyor.

County Road Improvements.-County road improvements made by Post Oak township since this system was established in 1911 were. up to January 1. 1918. twenty-four in number, and aggregated $1,320.70 furnished by citizens of the township, and $1,319.70 furnished by the county. In amount of this work. Post Oak township ranks second among the townships of the county.
Organizations.-The following is a complete list of all organizations of every kind in Post Oak township. Full details of each organization are in separate chapters on the different organizations.
Churches-Baptist. Harmony: Baptist. Leeton: Baptist, Providence; Brethren, Mineral Creek: Brethren. Union Mound: Christian. Leeton: Christian, Prairie View: Cumberland Presbyterian, Mt. Zion: Cumberland Presbyterian, Shiloh: Latter Day Saints. Post Oak: Methodist, Leeton; Methodist South, Cornelia: Primitive Baptist, Leeton.
Fraternal Organizations-Masons, Blue Lodge. Cold Springs: Modern Woodmen, Cornelia; Modern Woodmen. Leeton: Modern Woodmen, Post Oak; Royal Neighbors, Cornelia; Royal Neighbors, Leeton.
1917 War Organizations-Red Cross Leeton Branch.
Business Organizations-Bank of Leeton, Farmers Bank, West Lawn Telephone Company.
Homemakers Clubs-Hickory Grove, Shiloh.



Missouri Mormon Wars
In the 1830s, “Mormonism” commanded center stage in Missouri politics. Joseph Smith and the church he founded in New York State in 1830 quickly gained converts, attracting considerable attention throughout the northeastern United States. Originally named the Church of Christ, it subsequently became the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Believers were referred to as “Mormons” because of the church’s adherence to “The Book of Mormon,” their companion scripture to the Bible wherein the story of Jesus appearing to the ancestors of the Native Americans was told.
Haun's Mill
That same year, Smith dispatched a handful of missionaries to Missouri’s western border to preach the “restored gospel” to the Native American tribes concentrated there. In 1831 Smith proclaimed that God had designated western Missouri as the place where “Zion” would be “gathered” in anticipation of Christ’s second coming. His small band of missionaries soon became a steady stream of converts anxious to establish Zion in Missouri. 
Within a few years, the migration and settlement of Latter-day Saints in frontier Missouri led to events that would earn Mormonism a painful place in Missouri history. The state’s “Old Settlers” (usually recent immigrants to the Missouri frontier themselves) characterized the Mormon settlers as fanatics whose clannish behavior made a mockery of republican institutions by placing power in the hands of a single man. The Mormons claimed that they had done nothing wrong, and were attacked for their religious beliefs. Violence broke out in 1833 as the “Old Settlers” under the guise of “extra-legal” justice took the law into their own hands. 
It soon became clear that Missouri non-Mormons and Mormons could not live in the same area harmoniously. In 1836 a “separate but equal” proposal was finally devised to solve this problem, whereby the state legislature created a new county, “Caldwell,” in northwest Missouri as a sort of Mormon “Indian Reservation.” But the booming Mormon population, swelled by the immigration of thousands of eastern converts doomed this to failure, as Mormon settlers burst the borders of Caldwell County and spilled into neighboring counties. Violence broke out again at an election riot in 1838. Old Settler mobs and Mormon paramilitary units roamed the countryside. When the Mormons attacked a duly authorized militia under the belief it was an anti-Mormon mob, Missouri’s governor, Lilburn Boggs, ordered the Saints expelled from the state, or “exterminated,” if necessary. The conflict’s viciousness escalated, however, even without official sanction, when, on October 30, 1838, an organized mob launched a surprise attack on the small Mormon community of Haun’s Mill, massacring eighteen unsuspecting men and boys. Over the next year, around eight thousand church members, often ragged and deprived of their property, left Missouri for Illinois. 
The Missouri State Archives’ “Mormon War Papers” shed light on this frequently misunderstood episode of Missouri history. This collection includes documents such as Governor Bogg’s infamous “Extermination Order”, but also many lesser known, and less appreciated, documents that are well worthy of study, such as the report of the legislative joint committee appointed to investigate the “disturbances” between Mormons and non-Mormons. Included also are such items as legislative debates and the governors’ state of the state addresses in which the “Mormon problem” is discussed. The collection also includes the criminal hearing of Joseph Smith and other church leaders for treason and other crimes.
The Missouri State Archives would like to express its thanks to the Genealogical Society of Utah, the St. Louis Mercantile Library (and its director John Hoover), the Columbia Stake of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and Stephen S .Davis for their assistance in making these documents available.