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October 23, 2013

Whiteman Air Force Base - Sedalia Army Airfield, Missouri

Whiteman AFB is the home of the 509th Bomb Wing, which operates and maintains the Air Force’s premier weapon’s system, the B-2 Stealth Bomber, the AF Reserve 442nd Fighter Wing, the Missouri Army National Guard 1st Battalion 135th Aviation Unit and the US Navy Reserve Mobile Inshore Undersea Warfare Unit 114.
In 1942, the Army Air Corps chose the site of Sedalia Army Airfield for its glider program. The field trained glider pilots and paratroopers during World War II, one of just a handful of facilities doing so at the time, and later transformed into a bomber base in time for the Cold War. It was the first installation to receive the B-47 Stratojet in 1951.
By 1955, the airfield was renamed for 2nd Lt. George A. Whiteman, a local Missourian killed in the attack on Pearl Harbor. Whiteman AFB spent most of the next few decades as a strategic missile and bomber base.

B-2A Spirit 393rd Bomb Squadron, 509th Bomb Wing
Whiteman Air Force Base, WAFB, Missouri

SEDALIA ARMY AIR FIELD
The proud heritage of Whiteman Air Force Base dates back to 1942 when US Army Air Corp officials selected the site of the present-day base to be the home of Sedalia Army Air Field and a training base for WACO glider pilots.
In the spring of 1942, the massive buildup for World War II prompted the U.S. Army to search for a site near Sedalia, Mis­souri, as a glider training base. Among those areas were the state fair­grounds at the southeast extremity of Sedalia and near neigh­boring Dres­den, Missouri. Both sites were rejected due to lack of room for expansion. As the Army was prepar­ing to pack up and seek a location outside the area, Mr. A.G. Taubert, Mayor of Warrens­burg, met a Colonel Cox who was in charge of the survey and told him of a location ideal for an air base. Upon arrival at Knob Noster, the colonel became irate as he still had not seen a place remotely resembling a po­tential airfield site. Mr. Taubert drove up the next hill. Upon spying the large open field before him, Taubert stopped the car and Colonel Cox climbed out on top of the brand new Chevy to survey the land. Satisfied, the colonel returned to his base selec­tion board and recommended purchasing the area.
In May 1942, construction workers de­scended upon an area known to locals as the "Blue Flats" because of the color of the soil and began building a railroad spur for the new air base. The new railroad line, laid by the Missouri-Pacific Rail­road, was only the be­ginn­ing. The first building on base, an H-shaped admini­strative building also rose from the dusty Mis­souri farm land. The runways, the main impetus for the base, required 27,800 square yards of concrete. The entire runway was poured in 18 hours during a driving Midwestern rainstorm. The base reached a major milestone on 6 August 1942 when the Army declared the field officially open. 
Life for the pioneers of the field was not easy. One soldier remembered "There were dogs and cats all about and snakes crawling around in the lazy fall days. It rained so much that every­thing was grizzly gray and muddy yellow. There were no day­rooms, no theater, and no chapel. All you could do in the evening was write letters while you sat on the edge of your bunk." An officer recalled "The cars stuck in mud all over the field and you usually drove a vehicle as far as you could, then hike the rest of the way. The boys drank milk and pop out of barrels. Every officer had about 67 addi­tional duties." However, the citizens of the local com­munities pitched in to help the new arrivals. Sedalia and Warrensburg quickly set up USOs with reading and writing rooms. Chaperons brought young women to and from dances. To ease the pain of homesickness during the Yuletide sea­son, the USOs sent a gift to every man on base at Christmas 1942.
During the fall of 1942 base clerks faced a perplexing problem: the Army could not decide what to call the base. The first change came on 23 September 1942 when the "Sedalia" was dropped from the original address, leaving the base to be known only as Army Air Base, Warrens­burg, Missouri. The second change followed shortly. The address was changed to read Army Air Base, Knob Noster, Missouri. This, too, did not last long. On 12 November 1942, the new name, one which the base clerks fervently hoped would be the last, was Sedalia Army Air Field, Warrensburg, Missouri.

Sedalia Glider Base became one of the eight bases in the United States dedicated to training glider pilots for combat missions performed by the Troop Carrier Com­mand. Pilots flew C-46 or C-47 trans­ports and several types of cargo and personnel gliders, usually the Waco CG-4A. The forest green, fabric-covered gliders could carry 15 fully equipped men or a quarter-ton truck plus a smaller crew. They were towed in either single or double tow behind the trans­port aircraft and could land on fields not equipped for larger air­craft.
In the opening months of 1945 Sedalia AAFld began converting from C-47s to C-46s. By July and August 1945, the base had assumed the function of providing central instructor training for all combat crew train­ing bases throughout the I Troop Carrier Command. This program provided skills and teaching methods in all aspects of troop carrier flying. However, World War II finally ended on 14 August 1945. The base newspaper headline for that historic day declared "The Damn Thing's Over: Officially Ends 6 P.M." 

Following the war, the airfield remained in service as an operational location for Army Air Corp C-46 and C-47 transports. In December 1947, the base was inactivated but with the birth of the US Air Force as a separate, independent service, and the subsequent formation of the Strategic Air Command (SAC), the site was renamed and took on a new mission.

SEDALIA AIR FORCE BASE
In August 1951, SAC selected Sedalia AFB to be one of its new bombardment wings, with the first all-jet bomber, the B-47 Stratojet, and the KC-97 aerial refueling tanker assigned to the unit. Construction of facilities was conducted by the 4224th Air Base Squadron until October 20, 1952, when the base was turned over to the 340th Bombardment Wing. The first B-47 arrived on March 25, 1954 and six months later the first KC-97 arrived.

Aside from bomber operations, Sedalia AFB continued changing and growing. Further construction was approved and new facilities were opened. An ex­panded Base Exchange, post office, and officers' and non­commissioned officers' clubs opened in 1954. Work also began on recreational facilities for personnel in September 1954. Facilities included in this program were a gym­nasium, swimming pool, base­ball diamonds, tennis and basketball courts, and a football field.


WHITEMAN AIR FORCE BASE
One of the major events affecting the base began in 1954 when the Air Force initiated a program renaming bases to recognize airmen who had performed in an exceptional manner. Nominations were accepted from the surrounding communities to give the air base a new name. A board of officers was appointed to select three choices from a listing of six de­ceased Air Force heroes. The list included: General Hoyt S. Vandenberg, Lt. Charles A. Petty (Warrensburg), Lt. Eugene T. Tipton (War­rensburg), L­t. George A. Whiteman (Sedalia), Lt. Horace G. Roop and Lt. James D. Spore (Clinton).
On August 24, 1955 the US Air Force informed Mrs. Earlie Whiteman of Sedalia that the recently reopened Sedalia Air Force Base would be renamed Whiteman Air Force Base in tribute to her son, 2nd Lt. George A. Whiteman. The dedication and renaming ceremony took place on December 3, 1955.

As the base continued to mature in 1956, more buildings appeared on the skyline. With an increase in married personnel being assigned, housing became more critical. As a result, 400 housing units were requested. Bids were opened on and a $6.6 million contract for on-base housing construc­tion was awarded. Whiteman had within its five short years become a showplace as many federal and foreign govern­ment leaders con­tinually visited the base for a look at a typical SAC flying unit. 

It was during this period that two Air Force legends crossed paths for the first time. In July 1958, the 509th Bombardment Wing was moving its aircraft from Walker AFB, New Mexico, to Pease AFB, New Hampshire, when bad weather forced the 509th’s airborne aircraft to Whiteman. The 509th’s B-47s remained for the night before proceeding to Pease. As a result of this chance meeting, the first recorded contact between the 509th and Whiteman had been made.

Despite the amount of work done on Whiteman to improve life in general, more changes were at hand. The reli­able B-47 air­craft was being phased out of the Air Force's inventory for the newer and more advanced B-52 Stratofortress. Even though Whiteman had served well as a B-47 base, there were no plans to continue the tradition with B-52s. SAC had other plans for White­man.

351 STRATEGIC MISSILE WING
The story of the 351 Strategic Missile Wing (SMW) at Whiteman began in April 1961 when test borings made in the area around the base determined the geological make-up would support a land-based ICBM system. Three months later the DOD announced plans to base the Minuteman I ICMB system at Whiteman. Groundbreaking ceremonies with a host of dignitaries in attendance were held in April 1962 at the site now called Oscar-01. 
The project called for the excavation of 867,000 cubic yards of earth and rock. Contractors used 168,000 yards of concrete, 25,355 tons of reinforcing steel and 15,120 tons of structural steel, and the installation of a vast underground intersite network with enough cable to run from Whiteman AFB to 100 miles beyond Los Angeles. Amazingly, the construction and equipping of the 150 missile sites and 15 launch control centers took only two years, two months, and two weeks to complete. On June 29, 1964, the 351st went on full operational alert.

During the period May 1965 to October 1967 the Minuteman I was upgraded to the Minuteman II. Other modernization programs in the following decades improved the system and increased the survivability of the missile. In the mid-1980s the Minuteman Integrated Life Extension (Rivet MILE) program improved the safety, maintainability, and reliability of the missile facilities.
On 26 June 1976, wing personnel banded together to dedicate the Bi­centennial Peace Park.  The new park contained a Minuteman I missile, a B-47 bomber, and a UH-1H helicopter. Placed inside the missile and the bomber were time capsules containing artifacts from 1976. The boxes are to be opened when Whiteman is placed on inac­tive status or the year 2076, whichever oc­curs first.
On 11 June 1982, the base experienced a tragedy when a helicopter be­longing to Whiteman's Detachment 9, 37th Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Squadron, went down. The accident took the lives of the two pilots and four security policemen on board.

On July 31, 1991, President George H.W. Bush and Premier Mikhail Gorbachev signed the historic Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START) which called for dismantling and destruction of the Minuteman II ICBMs. President Bush ordered a stand-down of all Minuteman II missiles from alert well before the requirements of START called for such action. Less than 24 hours later, the 351st reported to SAC that its missile were off alert.

Two years later the wing’s first launch control center, India-01, shut down operations. On May 7, 1993, the last reentry vehicle was removed from Golf-02, and on December 8, 1993 the wing imploded its first silo, India-02. On May 18, 1995, the last Minuteman II missile, located at Juliet-03, was removed from its site. The 351st SMW was officially inactivated on July 31, 1995.

509 BOMB WING
In 1988, as part of a rapid evolution which pushed technology to its limits, Congressman Ike Skelton announced the B-2 Advanced Technology Bomber would be based at Whiteman. The 509 Bomb Wing traces its histori­cal roots to its World War II ancestor, the 509 Composite Group, which was formed with one mission in mind: to drop the atomic bomb. The Group made history on August 6, 1945, when the B-29 "Enola Gay," piloted by Colonel Paul W. Tibbets, Jr., dropped the first atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan. On August 9, 1945, the “Bockscar,” piloted by Major Charles Sweeney visited the Japanese mainland and unleashed the atomic inferno upon Nagasaki.

On September 30, 1990, the 509th Bomb Wing was transferred to Whiteman AFB and in July 1993, accepted host responsibilities for the base. On 20 July 1993, Whiteman received its first perma­nently assigned aircraft in almost 30 years. Piloted by General Ronald A. Marcotte, T-38 #62-609, complete with a B-2-like paint scheme, touched down on the White­man runway at approximately 1000 hours.

On December 17, 1993, the ninetieth anniversary of Orville Wright’s historic first successful, controlled, heavier than air powered flight at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, the world’s most sophisticated and advanced aircraft, the B-2 Advanced Technology Bomber arrived at Whiteman Air Force Base. At approximately 1400 hours local, a low whine was heard and the gath­ered throng looked skyward to see a dark bat-shaped aircraft fly over. The Spirit of Missouri circled the field once and then landed. After taxing to the appointed spot, the engines stopped, the crew hatch opened and General John Michael Loh, ACC Commander, stepped off the plane, and into Air Force history.

Operation ALLIED FORCE
The B-2 first saw combat on March 23, 1999, during NATO operations in Serbia and Kosovo, the first sustained offensive combat air offensive conducted solely from US soil. Over a period of two months, the 509 generated 49 B-2 sorties flown directly from Missouri to Europe and return. Although the B-2s accounted for only 1 percent of all NATO sorties, the aircraft’s all-weather, precision capability allowed it to deliver 11 percent of the munitions used in the air campaign. The missions lasted an average of 29 hours, demonstrating the global reach of the B-2.

Operation ENDURING FREEDOM
Following the terrorist attacks on New York City and Washington, D.C. on September 11, 2001, the 509 quickly transitioned to a wartime mode by joining forces with the 314th Airlift Wing, Little Rock, AR, and the Missouri Air National Guard’s 139th Airlift Wing, St. Joseph, MO, to send Missouri Task Force-1 to assist rescue efforts at the World Trade Center.
In October 2001 the B-2 bombers led America’s strike force in Afghanistan, hitting the first targets in the country to “kick down the door” for the air campaign which followed. The bombers again flew from Missouri to their targets before landing at a forward location in the Indian Ocean to exchange crews which the engines continued to run. The combat missions lasted more than 40 hours, with the aircraft operating continuously for more than 70 hours without incident before returning to Whiteman.
After twice proving its ability to fly combat missions from Missouri, the wing stepped up efforts to deploy the B-2 from forward locations. By late 2002, the AF had completed special shelters for the aircraft at an overseas operating location. The shelters provided a controlled climate similar to the facilities at Whiteman for specialized work on the aircraft skin in order to maintain its stealth characteristics. This ability to sustain operations from a forward location added a new dimension of flexibility to potential air campaigns.

Operation IRAQI FREEDOM
The new shelters were put to use when the B-2 bombers again led a coalition air strike against the regime of Saddam Hussein, beginning on March 21, 2003. The famous “shock and awe” campaign saw unprecedented use of precision-guided munitions by the B-2 in an effort to minimize collateral damage and destroy key targets. The campaign also marked another milestone for the 509 BW, as B-2s flew combat missions from both Whiteman AFB and a forward deployed location simultaneously.

On December 17, 2003, the world celebrated the centennial of the first powered flight by the Wright Brothers. At the same time, the 509 Bomb Wing celebrated the 10-year anniversary of the Spirit of Missouri’s arrival at Whiteman. Only a decade after delivery, the B-2 was now a proven weapon system, a veteran of three campaigns and first-ever forward deployment. In recognition of the maturity of the system and the unit, the Air Force declared the B-2 Fully Operational Capable.
Since that day in 2003, the B-2’s forward presence has become a reality and proved that it can deliver combat airpower, any time and any place. The deployment to Guam, which began in February 2005, provided a continuous bomber presence in the Asia Pacific region and augmented Pacific Command’s establishment of a deterrent force. The 80-day tour, the longest in the bomber’s 13-year history, also marked the first B-2 deployment since the aircraft was declared fully operational.

THE FUTURE AND WHITEMAN AIR FORCE BASE
Whiteman Air Force Base is also home of the Air Force Reserve's 442nd Fighter Wing, flying A-10 Thunderbolt IIs; the Army National Guard's 1-135th Attack Battalion, flying the AH-64 Apache; and the Navy Reserve's Maritime Expeditionary Security Division 13, which provides light, mobile, short-duration, point defense Anti-Terrorism Force Protection forces for USN ships and aircraft and other high value assets in locations where U.S. or host-nation security infrastructure is either inadequate or non-existent.
In October 2008, the 131st Bomb Wing was activated at Whiteman AFB. As an Air National Guard “Classic Associate Unit” of the 509 Bomb Wing, the 131st BW retains a separate organizational structure and chain of command while its personnel are functionally integrated within the 509 BW, which maintains principal responsibility for the aircraft. This association enables both units to train and deploy personnel in support of the USAF B-2 mission.

The most powerful weapon at Whiteman is the Airmen. Airmen from all units have recently deployed in support of global combat operations. These warriors were also on the front lines of disaster bringing relief to the Gulf Coast after Hurricane Katrina devastated the region in September 2005. Whether serving at home or in forward locations, Whiteman Airmen exemplify the phrase, “Service before Self.”

In the opening months of 1945 Sedalia AAFld began converting from C-47s to C-46s. By July and August 1945, the base had assumed the function of providing central instructor training for all combat crew train­ing bases throughout the I Troop Carrier Command. This program provided skills and teaching methods in all aspects of troop carrier flying. However, World War II finally ended on 14 August 1945. The base newspaper headline for that historic day declared "The Damn Thing's Over: Officially Ends 6 P.M."


Sedalia Army Air Field Class A Pass  Squadron A 322nd AAF Base Unit
Sedalia Army Airfield, Whiteman Air Force Base, POW CAMP





WACO CG4A Glider, Used at Sedalia Army Airfield, Johnson County, MO





Skytrains in Train

Serial 316101, ship 20, in the lead, is a C-47A.
The crews of these two C-47 Skytrains, along with whatever chase plane the photographer was in, clearly were having fun on this day, switching out positions for the photog.

The back of the photo on the left is marked "Photographic Section, Sedalia Army Air Field, Warrensburg Missouri" (the back of the second print isn't marked at all). Sedalia was established in November 1942 as a training base for WACO glider pilots, so these two C-47s likely were primarily used as glider tow planes. During the early months of 1945, the base's C-47s were replaced by Curtiss C-46 Commandos, so that plus the tail numbers of these planes place the date the photos were shot somewhere between late 1943 and early 1945.



Ship 26 is either serial 316140 or 316149, the image just isn't clear enough to be certain, either way, it is a C-47


Following the war, the airfield remained in service as an operational location for Army Air Corp C-46 and C-47 transports. In December 1947, the base was inactivated but with the birth of the US Air Force as a separate, independent service, and the subsequent formation of the Strategic Air Command (SAC), the site was renamed and took on a new mission.






Sedalia Army Airfield C-47s in formation.
Barracks at Whiteman Air Force Base







Company A 880th Airborne Engineers Aviation Battalion 1944 Army Whiteman Air Force Base

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Ralph Foster was a WWII pilot, and a famed midget race car driver. In his later years he used his piloting skills to combat forest fires, make archaelogical expeditions to South America, and helped to map much of

the Orange County & Los Angeles County regions in aerial shots.

Ralph flew C-47s and the like and towed gliders like this  Waco CG-4A. He took his training at Laurinburg- Maxton Army Air Base. He served in the 12th Troop Carrier Command at Sedalia Army Air Field in Missouri until about 1946 ~ when he was transfered to Hawaii to fly fighter aircraft for the 81st.  






WWII photographs, Photographed &/or developed by Ralph Foster when he was stationed at Sedalia Army Air Field in (Warrensburg/Knob Noster)Missouri. Lieutenant Foster was a pilot flying C-46 and towing Waco Gliders and the like for the Troop Carrier Command.  We see Bob Hope with Vera Vague & Jerry Colonna. We see an air show where parachutists line up to board an aircraft ~ and then two pics of them as they descend from the sky out of C-46 Commandos. We see nurse cadets with Col. J.B. McCauley /the injured being evacuated from a plane / and a dog that's become a flying mascot for a group of soldiers - possibly parachutists as well.













WWII photographs, Photographed &/or developed by Ralph Foster when he was stationed at Sedalia Army Air Field in (Warrensburg/Knob Noster)Missouri. Lieutenant Foster was a pilot flying C-46 and towing Waco Gliders and the like for the Troop Carrier Command.  We see Bob Hope with Vera Vague & Jerry Colonna. We see an air show where parachutists line up to board an aircraft ~ and then two pics of them as they descend from the sky out of C-46 Commandos. We see nurse cadets with Col. J.B. McCauley /the injured being evacuated from a plane / and a dog that's become a flying mascot for a group of soldiers - possibly parachutists as well.

WWII photographs, Photographed &/or developed by Ralph Foster when he was stationed at Sedalia Army Air Field in (Warrensburg/Knob Noster)Missouri. Lieutenant Foster was a pilot flying C-46 and towing Waco Gliders and the like for the Troop Carrier Command.  We see Bob Hope with Vera Vague & Jerry Colonna. We see an air show where parachutists line up to board an aircraft ~ and then two pics of them as they descend from the sky out of C-46 Commandos. We see nurse cadets with Col. J.B. McCauley /the injured being evacuated from a plane / and a dog that's become a flying mascot for a group of soldiers - possibly parachutists as well.


WWII photographs, Photographed &/or developed by Ralph Foster when he was stationed at Sedalia Army Air Field in (Warrensburg/Knob Noster)Missouri. Lieutenant Foster was a pilot flying C-46 and towing Waco Gliders and the like for the Troop Carrier Command.  We see Bob Hope with Vera Vague & Jerry Colonna. We see an air show where parachutists line up to board an aircraft ~ and then two pics of them as they descend from the sky out of C-46 Commandos. We see nurse cadets with Col. J.B. McCauley /the injured being evacuated from a plane / and a dog that's become a flying mascot for a group of soldiers - possibly parachutists as well.




































D-Day
82nd Airborne members check their equipment before boarding a 442nd Troop Carrier Group C-47 bound for Drop Zone "T" near St. Mere Eglise in Normandy on D-Day, June 6, 1944. The 442nd Troop Carrier Group launched 45 C-47s with approximately 20 soldiers in each aircraft. The 442nd TCG was the World War II predecessor of the 442nd Fighter Wing, an Air Force Reserve Command A-10 Thunderbolt II unit based at Whiteman Air Force Base, Mo. (Photo courtesy of the Herky Barbour estate) 

WHITEMAN AIR FORCE BASE, Mo.
 -- (Editor's Note: This is a reprint of a June 2009 story by now-retired Master Sgt. Bill Huntington, 442nd Fighter Wing Public Affairs).
D-DAY Remember 442nd Troop Carrier
The 442nd Fighter Wing flag is adorned with battle streamers reflecting the unit's accomplishments through its history. One streamer, a simple blue ribbon with two words embroidered in white on it, reads "Normandy Invasion."
Seventy years ago, in the early hours of June 6, 1944, the 442nd Troop Carrier Group launched 45 C-47 Skytrain transports, laden with 700 members of the 82nd Airborne's 507th Parachute Infantry Regiment, destined for the French countryside just northwest of the small town of St. Mere Eglise.
The journey to Normandy and "Drop Zone T" on D-Day began only nine months before at Sedalia Army Air Field, now Whiteman Air Force Base, as the Group formed from a collection of veteran aviators, volunteers and draftees under the command of then-Major Charles M. Smith. Major Smith organized four flying squadrons, the 303rd, 304th, 305th and 306th Troop Carrier Squadrons, each commanded respectively by Robert G. Whittington, Jr., Kenneth L. Glassburn, John A. Crandall and Royal S. Thompson. Also assigned to the 442nd were the100th Service Group and the 464th Air Service Group, with additional subordinate units.
The Group trained around the central Missouri area flying the C-47 and the Waco CG-4A combat assault glider. Before their departure to Europe in March 1944, the Group also trained in Alliance, Neb., Baer Field, Ind. and Pope Field, N.C.
Landon Cozad, a 24-year-old first lieutenant, and a C-47 pilot, came on board with the 442nd in November of 1943 when the group was at Alliance, Neb., and was assigned to the 303rd TCS.
Cozad said of Alliance, and of the subsequent locations, that all of their training had a greater purpose than just being good pilots.
At Pope Field the group would work with the airborne paratroopers based at nearby Ft. Bragg to gain a sense of what it would be like to drop them when D-day arrived.
"We were at Pope for two months in training," said Bill Silberkleit, a navigator with the 305th Troop Carrier Squadron. "We doing practice drops and getting to know the people we would be flying with."
As a navigator, Silberkleit, assigned to the 305th Troop Carrier Squadron, had to take a different training path and had joined up with the 442nd after it arrived at Pope Field.
The air echelon of the 442nd flew the C-47s across the Atlantic by way of South America Ascension Island and Africa while the rest of the Group departed New York City aboard the refitted-for-war ocean liner, the Queen Mary.
The dangerous nature of their business hit the Group in North Africa when they lost one C-47 in a crash landing.
"There was a hell of a sandstorm that day and even though we flew at high altitudes, which was unusual for us, there was still sand at that altitude," Cozad said. "They lost an engine and I think the problem with a single engine landing is that you are afraid you won't make it to the field. As a result they overshot."
The crash claimed all but one person aboard the aircraft as it plowed into tall tree stumps from a recently logged area off the end of the runway. Despite the losses, the 442nd moved northward.
Both air and ground components of the Group arrived within a day of each other at the 442nd's new duty station at Fulbeck, England, a rural air field 120 miles north of London.
As the group settled in to their new surroundings Bill Silberkleit received temporary duty orders.
"I was there about three weeks when I was assigned to North Witham for pathfinder training," Silberkleit said.
Even though he'd been at Fulbeck a short while it was long enough to get a sense of how many other airfields were in the area.
"One thing interesting about Fulbeck is that there were three airfields within three miles of each other, he said. "Many times people would come in for final approach and find out they were coming in at the wrong air field. They were all that close together."
Indeed with the sheer number of installations across the countryside, it could almost said that England had become one huge airfield.
For Jack Prince, a 303rd TCS C-47 pilot, life at Fulbeck was a continuation of what had been practiced at the stateside airfields.
"We did a hell of a lot of shooting landings, towing gliders and formation flying at Fulbeck," Mr. Cozad said.
Prince concurred.
"We did do a lot of formation flying, some practice parachute drops and we practiced pulling gliders there," Prince added. "We were just doing what we would be doing when we got to (Normandy)."
It wasn't all work for the Airmen and when off duty the 442nd members visited nearby towns and villages.
"We went a couple of times to Nottingham and had some fun there," Cozad said of the town made famous by the exploits of English legend Robin Hood.
While group members did visit historic sites in their off duty times more often than not, they took advantage of local pubs, gatherings and dances for entertainment.
Almost exactly a month after arriving in England, the 442nd experienced another loss on April 25, when a 303rd TCS C-47 crashed after takeoff from Membury Airfield - a Troop Carrier base halfway between London and Bristol - killing all 14 aboard the aircraft.
On the ground English farmer, Ernest Huzzey, was farming the same field where the crash occurred.
"It was banking," he said. "It was flying over the woods. It clipped the top of a tree and brought it down. It exploded when it hit the ground, not far from where I had just been working. There were 14 or 15 of them."
Fourteen members of the 442nd TCG - most from the 303rd squadron -- died in the crash, the single largest loss of life in the history of the unit.
A group of 303rd TCS members, led by Colonel Smith, with Maj. Whittington, 303rd TCS commander, attended a funeral service for the men on Saturday, April 29, at Brookwood American Cemetery near Bagshot, England. One of the Airmen, because of his religious faith, had been buried at the same cemetery two days earlier. The next day, a memorial service, led by Group Chaplain Robert Tindall, was held at the chapel back at Fulbeck.
As D-day preparations progressed through into May, Colonel Smith, kept the unit on task meeting their training requirements and focused them on being proficient in dropping paratroopers. The glider pilots sensed that they might not be part of the initial assault. Still, they worked to be sure the Group was ready, and many times they worked in areas outside of flying.
In glider pilot Jim Clark's journal he made the following entries.
June 1, 1944 - Up early to make sure all things are going well at transportation. Many things tell me that the invasion is getting closer every day.
June 3, 1944 - Things are hot now - I spent the day overseeing that our tow ships are properly marked. We put black and white stripes two-feet wide on each wing and the fuselage. Each plane is equipped with life rafts, life preservers, flak suits and ammunition for all firearms.
June 4, 1944 - A rainbow appeared in the sky this evening - a good omen. It doesn't look as if our gliders are going to be used in the first assault and we are disappointed.
Despite the disappointment, Clark spent the day working on the tow tropes and intercom connection wires to ensure all was in good shape when they were called upon.
While Clark pursued his task, over at Witham, navigator Bill Silberkleit learned that the invasion was at hand, or so they thought. As it would turn out, weather in the English Channel prevented the June 5th assault and Supreme Allied Commander General Dwight Eisenhower put the operation on a 24-hour hold.
"On June 4th, they briefed us about D-day, which was supposed to happen on June 5th, and sent us back to our units with the instructions not to tell anyone what we knew," Silberkleit said. "Of course it was delayed a day and I had to sit on that."
"We had a mock run through of going every day for a week or so and we never were told which day that we were going to go," Kozad added. "We'd march down to the flight line and the paratroopers would be lounging around in the grass under the wing, sometimes to be in the shade. Then we'd all board the airplane but we never went.
"One day we marched down there and they took us into a meeting room and they said, 'Today's the day.' We all set our watches and I took some notes," he said. "We were given maps and escape kits with a little American money in them."
"When they decided it was a no-go, they quarantined everybody and you couldn't go anywhere," Prince said. "So we just kind of hung around waiting for them to say it was time to go."
Finally, in the late evening hours of June 5, aircrews and paratroopers alike made their way to the C-47s, each silhouetted by the full moon, and loaded up for the mission.
"They all had about three-hundred pounds of equipment on them and they couldn't even get on board," Silberkleit said of the paratroopers. "We had to take two of us to sort of push them up piggy back to get them into the aircraft. They just had so much stuff on them.
"They were gung ho they were all really ready to go," he said. "I didn't see any of them that were reluctant; they weren't frightened, that's for damned sure."
At 19 minutes after midnight, Mission Boston, serial 26 - comprised of 45 C-47s of the 442nd Troop Carrier Group - took off into the night sky to begin what became termed as the "Longest Day."
After the Group formed up the serial turned south and in the lead ship, with Colonel Smith at the controls, navigator Bill Silberkleit guided the group over the darkened English countryside.
"We flew from Fulbeck down towards southern England to a jumping-off point down there near Bournemouth," Silberkleit said. "From there we would fly down toward our destination flying right between the two Channel Islands coming in to the Cherbourg Peninsula."
"We came in over and between the Jersey and Guernsey Islands on to the west coast of the peninsula," Prince added. "The closer we got the cloudier it got. There was just a layer of clouds right at the altitude that we wanted to fly, around 1,500 feet. So we dropped down a little ways and tried to get under it."
"I had radar on board my aircraft and as I approached the coast I was able to pinpoint myself along the coast line," Silberkleit said. "As soon as we crossed the coast line, the sky was sort of lit up (with antiaircraft fire). There were tracers and everything coming up that you could think of. (To me) it was not a frightening thing, it was very fascinating. You don't think of those things that might happen or what is involved, you are intrigued with what you are doing at the particular time"
Driving inland toward drop zone T, the Group prepared to drop its "sticks" of paratroopers. Some of the Group was still on course while others ran into a thick cloud bank and lost sight of the formation.
"We were flying at about 450 feet above the ground and we didn't see any fog," Silberkleit said. "To us (in the lead ship) everything looked perfect. I was astounded later to find out that our unit was stacked up (because of fog) and that there were a lot of aircraft in the clouds and above the clouds that could not see where we (were).
At 2:44 a.m., the green jump light was switched on in Colonel Smith's aircraft and each ship, in turn, disgorged its heavily-laden paratroopers over Normandy.
In 2008, at a reunion of 82nd Airborne soldiers from D-Day, Silberkleit was able to talk with one of the paratroopers who had jumped from his plane that night.
"He told me that we dropped him right on the area where he was supposed to go," Silberkleit said. "It made me feel really good. I do know that we had some aircraft in our unit that dropped theirs (paratroopers) miles away. They were the ones that experienced the fog and the overcast. One of my navigator friends told me they had to come back around a second time to make their drop. They had missed it the first time in."
As soon as each plane dropped its paratroopers, the aircraft went to full throttle and quickly descended to avoid anti-aircraft fire as they headed for the coast of France and then England. Even with that, the night was not without losses for the 442nd.
"Our planes returned at about 0530," Clark later wrote in his journal. "We apparently lost three and some others had holes from flak and machine-gun fire, but the mission had to be rated a success."
One of those losses was Mr. Prince's plane, and although he managed to walk away from the crash landing, he and his crew had to spend the next more than two weeks in hiding until the Germans were driven from the area. Their arrival back at Fulbeck created quite a stir among those who had feared the worst for the missing Airmen.
"Everyone in the squadron assumed they were held captive or they were dead until one day they showed up in the Mess Hall (back at Fulbeck) with long scraggly beards," Cozad said.
The group would fly three more missions over the Cherbourg peninsula in the days following D-day. On June 10, the Group was ordered to leave Fulbeck for a new airfield in western Britain which would put them closer to France and the missions to come.
Following the night of nights that was their D-day, the 442nd TCG would go on to lead or participate in every major airborne operation in the European theatre of war.

Crashes at Sedalia Army Airfield
Status:
Date:Sunday 5 September 1943
Time:23:27
Type:Silhouette image of generic DC3 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Douglas C-53D-DO Skytrooper
Operator:United States Army Air Force - USAAF
Registration:42-68841
C/n / msn:11768
First flight:
Engines:2 Pratt & Whitney R-1830-92
Crew:Fatalities: 4 / Occupants: 4
Passengers:Fatalities: 7 / Occupants: 7
Total:Fatalities: 11 / Occupants: 11
Airplane damage:Damaged beyond repair
Location:16 km (10 mls) S of Sedalia, MO (   United States of America)
Phase:En route (ENR)
Nature:Military
Departure airport:?
Destination airport:?
Narrative:
The C-53 broke up when encoutering an area of severe winds at 6000 ft altitude.




Saturday 10 July 1943
Type:Silhouette image of generic DC3 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Douglas C-47A-35-DL
Operator:United States Army Air Force - USAAF
Registration:42-23801
C/n / msn:9663
First flight:
Engines:2 Pratt & Whitney R-1830-92
Crew:Fatalities: 3 / Occupants: 4
Passengers:Fatalities: 3 / Occupants: 15
Total:Fatalities: 6 / Occupants: 19
Airplane damage:Damaged beyond repair
Location:Sedalia Army Air Field, MO (SZL) (   United States of Americashow on map
Phase:Landing (LDG)
Nature:Military
Departure airport:Alliance AAF, NE (AIA/KAIA), United States of America
Destination airport:Sedalia Army Air Field, MO (SZL/KSZL), United States of America
Narrative:
While attempting to land on runway 31 the left wing fell off to the left from a height of about 50 ft. The C-47 cartwheeled and burst into flames.



Status:
Date:Monday 10 May 1965
Time:06:01
Type:Silhouette image of generic DC6 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Douglas DC-6A
Operator:Aaxico Airlines
Registration:N6579C
C/n / msn:45480/980
First flight:1958
Total airframe hrs:20557
Crew:Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 3
Passengers:Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 0
Total:Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 3
Airplane damage:Damaged beyond repair
Location:near Knobnoster-Whiteman AFB, MO (   United States of America)
Phase:Approach (APR)
Nature:Cargo
Departure airport:Oklahoma City-Tinker AFB, OK (TIK/KTIK), United States of America
Destination airport:Warrensburg-Whiteman AFB, MO (SZL/KSZL), United States of America
Flightnumber:1416B
Narrative:
The DC-6 departed Tinker AFB on an IFR flight plan to Whiteman AFB. The crew soon cancelled IFR and continued VFR. The flight was cleared for a straight-in visual approach to runway 36. At that time a line of thunderstorms was located west of the field with portions moving across the approach path. The approach was continued with the flight encountering heavy rain and an area of reduced visibility. The DC-6 struck trees 4204 feet short of the runway threshold and 740 feet right of the extended centreline. The plane broke up and slid 1200 feet before coming to rest. A fire started near the left inboard fuel tanks.

PROBABLE CAUSE: "An improperly executed landing approach into an area of adverse weather, during which the aircraft was allowed to descend to an altitude too low to avoid striking trees."

Sedalia Army Air Field, Accidents, Fatalities, Missouri "Airplane Crash" Whiteman Air Force Base today
Last updated: 5 November 2013

 Sedalia Army Air Field, Missouri
Country:United States of America
IATA code:SZL
ICAO code:KSZL
Elevation:870 feet / 265 m
Airport also known as:
1945Sedalia Army Air Field, MO
1955Warrensburg-Whiteman AFB, MO

datetyperegistrationoperatorfat.locationpiccat
24-JUN-1967Douglas C-124C Globemaster II50-0086USAF0Warrensburg-...A1
16-JUL-1945Curtiss C-46D-10-CU44-77557USAAF2Sedalia Army...A1
14-MAR-1945Curtiss C-46D-15-CU44-77962USAAFSedalia Army...A1
20-OCT-1944Douglas C-47-DL (DC-3)41-18557USAAFSedalia Army...A1
14-SEP-1944Douglas C-47A-50-DL (DC-3)42-24321USAAF2near Warrensburg-...A1
14-SEP-1944Douglas C-47A-50-DL (DC-3)42-24317USAAF2near Warrensburg-...A1
12-SEP-1944Douglas C-47A-30-DL (DC-3)42-23777USAAFSedalia Army...A1
04-SEP-1944Douglas C-47A-30-DK (DC-3)43-48011USAAFSedalia Army...A1
30-JUL-1944Douglas C-47-DL (DC-3)42-32838USAAFSedalia Army...A1
30-JUL-1944Douglas C-47A-30-DL (DC-3)42-23769USAAFSedalia Army...A1
23-JUL-1944Douglas C-47A-80-DL (DC-3)43-15269USAAFSedalia Army...A1
21-JUL-1944Douglas C-47-DL (DC-3)41-38604USAAFSedalia Army...A1
05-JUL-1944Douglas C-47A-40-DL (DC-3)42-24075USAAFSedalia Army...A1
21-APR-1944Douglas C-47A-60-DL (DC-3)43-30688USAAFSedalia Army...A1
21-APR-1944Douglas C-47A-50-DL (DC-3)42-24320USAAFSedalia Army...A1
21-APR-1944Douglas C-47A-40-DL (DC-3)42-24029USAAFSedalia Army...A1
11-MAR-1944Douglas C-47A-1-DL (DC-3)42-23312USAAFSedalia Army...A1
22-NOV-1943Douglas C-47A-65-DL (DC-3)42-100490USAAFSedalia Army...A1
25-SEP-1943Douglas C-47A-45-DL (DC-3)42-24126USAAFSedalia Army...A1
10-SEP-1943Douglas C-47A-35-DL (DC-3)42-23915USAAFSedalia Army...A1
24-AUG-1943Douglas C-47A-45-DL (DC-3)42-24125USAAFSedalia Army...A1
28-JUL-1943Douglas C-47A-15-DL (DC-3)42-23385USAAFSedalia Army...A1
10-JUL-1943Douglas C-47A-35-DL (DC-3)42-23801USAAF6Sedalia Army...A1
04-JUL-1943Douglas C-47A-30-DL (DC-3)42-23777USAAFSedalia Army...A1
18-JUN-1943Douglas C-47A-30-DL (DC-3)42-23784USAAFSedalia Army...A1

datetyperegistrationoperatorfat.locationpiccat
16-JUL-1945Curtiss C-46D-10-CU44-77557USAAF2Sedalia Army...A1


27-APR-1945Curtiss C-46D-10-CU44-77706USAAF11near Claude, TXA1
22-MAR-1945Curtiss C-46A-55-CK43-47184USAAF2near Slater, MOA1
22-MAR-1945Curtiss C-46D-5-CU44-77320USAAF2near Slater, MOA1

datetyperegistrationoperatorfat.locationpiccat
16-JUL-1945Curtiss C-46D-10-CU44-77557USAAF2Sedalia Army...A1
22-MAR-1945Curtiss C-46A-55-CK43-47184USAAF2near Slater, MOA1
22-MAR-1945Curtiss C-46D-5-CU44-77320USAAF2near Slater, MOA1
14-MAR-1945Curtiss C-46D-15-CU44-77962USAAFSedalia Army...A1
14-SEP-1944Douglas C-47A-50-DL (DC-3)42-24321USAAF2near Warrensburg-...A1
14-SEP-1944Douglas C-47A-50-DL (DC-3)42-24317USAAF2near Warrensburg-...A1
10-JUL-1943Douglas C-47A-35-DL (DC-3)42-23801USAAF6Sedalia Army...A1







SEDALIA AIR FORCE BASE
In August 1951, SAC selected Sedalia AFB to be one of its new bombardment wings, with the first all-jet bomber, the B-47 Stratojet, and the KC-97 aerial refueling tanker assigned to the unit. Construction of facilities was conducted by the 4224th Air Base Squadron until October 20, 1952, when the base was turned over to the 340th Bombardment Wing. The first B-47 arrived on March 25, 1954 and six months later the first KC-97 arrived.
Aside from bomber operations, Sedalia AFB continued changing and growing. Further construction was approved and new facilities were opened. An ex­panded Base Exchange, post office, and officers' and non­commissioned officers' clubs opened in 1954. Work also began on recreational facilities for personnel in September 1954. Facilities included in this program were a gym­nasium, swimming pool, base­ball diamonds, tennis and basketball courts, and a football field.
Main Gate Whiteman Air Force Base, c. 1955
B-47 Whiteman Air Force Base

B-47
Flightline WAFB MO
Press photo from 1965 featuring In Special Ceremonies At Whiteman Monday Posthumous Decorations Were Awarded Capt. Richard D. Goss, Air Force officer killed in Viet Nam. Receiving the medals and citations from Brig. Gen. Richard N. Ellis, commander, 17th Strategic Missile Division, were (left to right) the captain's widow, Karen; his son, Gregory, 8, of Knob Noster and his mother, Mrs. Cecil Goss of McMinnville, Oreg.

RICHARD DEAN GOSS

is honored on Panel 1E, Row 63 of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

  • Wall Name:RICHARD D GOSS
  • Date of Birth:10/12/1932
  • Date of Casualty:8/29/1964
  • Home of Record:Seattle
  • County of Record:
  • State:WA
  • Branch of Service:AIR FORCE
  • Rank:CAPT
  • Panel/Row:1E, 63
  • Casualty Province:BIEN HOA

Richard Dean Goss
ON THE WALL:Panel 1E Line 63
PERSONAL DATA:
  Home of      RecordSeattle, WA
  Date of birth:10/12/1932
  This page Copyright© 1997-2013 www.VirtualWall.org
MILITARY DATA:
  Service:United States Air Force
  Grade at loss:O3
  Rank/Rate:Captain
  ID No:3039058
  MOS/RATING:1115:Pilot, Tactical Aircraft
  Length Service:12
  Unit:1ST AIR COMMANDO SQDN, 34TH TAC GROUP, 13TH AF
CASUALTY DATA:
  Start Tour:Not Recorded
  Incident Date:08/29/1964
  Casualty Date:08/29/1964
  Age at Loss:31
  Location:Bien Hoa Province, South Vietnam
  Remains:Body recovered
  Casualty Type:Hostile, died outright
  Casualty Reason:Fixed Wing - Crew
  Casualty Air loss or crash over land
  URL: www.VirtualWall.org/dg/GossRD01a.htm


Link to Tributes
THE VIRTUAL WALL ®   www.VirtualWall.org

USAF fixed-wing losses in Viet Nam
A-1 Skyraider --191 total, 150 in combat- First loss A-1E 52-132465 (1st Air Commando Squadron, 34th TG) shot down during the night of 28-29 August 1964 near Bien Hoa, SVN  Bien_Hoa
Combat and Operations History
1964-1964 MAAGV/MACV
1964-1964 Vietnam War/Operations 1961-1965
 Additional Information
Last Known Activity Captain Goss's aircraft, an A-1E (#52-132465), was the first USAF A-1E to be lost in the war when it was shot down by AAA, crashing 200 yards from the runway at Bien Hoa AB, RVN. Captain Goss was killed along with his Vietnamese co-pilot while practicing night landings. 
118 kb
Capt. Richard Goss, USAF


Information Related to your TWS Remembrance Profile #80283

I am the wife of Capt. Richard D. Goss who was killed at Bien Hoa, Vietnam 29 August 64.
His interment is at Evergreen Washalli, in Seattle, WA. Dick graduated from Lincoln High School, Seattle, WA in 1950. He attended Linfield College in McMinnville, Oregon from 1950 to 1952 when he enlisted in the AF. Dick never lived In Los Angeles, CA., his home address on the Vietnam Wall in Wa D.C. His mother resided in Los Angeles for a few years while his brother was attending Optometry School in LA before moving back to McMinnville, Oregon in 1956.

Dick left four children, Gregory Dean, 8 years, Carol 6 years, Laura 5 years, and Richard Dean II, 21 months. Even now after 48 years his loss has left a void with his family that never can be filled.

Please contact me.
Karen A Goss McGough
12314 24th Avenue N. E.
Seattle, Wa 98125-5260
(H) 206-363-9365 (C) 206-948-7471
Email Address: k2mcgough@msn.com
Phone: 206-363-9365

From his wife, this note: Captain Goss left a wife and four children, Gregory Dean, 8 years, Carol 6 years, Laura 5 years, and Richard Dean II, 21 months at his passing. Even now after 48 years his loss has left a void with his family that never can be filled. 

Captain Goss received his commission in 1955, He had previously been an enlisted airman.
On a very stormy night, I was on duty at Bien Hoa AB, RVN, the night of 29 Aug 1964. I was a member of the U.S. Air Force, attached to the 34th Tactical Group. I was assigned to drive an O11-A crash truck and my duty field was Fire Protection Specialist (Crash Rescue). As I recall, most of my shift was at late chow when I all at once noted a large fireball off the end of the runway and a few seconds later, we got an emergency response call from the tower of a aircraft crash. Those of us available responded immediately and headed, in our crash trucks, toward the crash site. I was alone in my crash truck which normally has a crew of 5 but I knew the others would be responding from the mess hall and would eventually catch up with me. We went as far as we could at the end of the runway but the aircraft which we could see was on fire was across a mine field which we could not cross. The plane was still several hundred yards from us. Very soon, the helicopter fire-fighting crew flew overhead and were soon at the crash site. We saw it return overhead but was soon seen to once again head for the crash site. I later learned that the pilot was Capt. Richard Goss and he had not survived the crash and the second trip in by the chopper crew was to find and return his vietnamese observer who had been with him and it was not known that a second person was on board until the captain was returned to the tower area. The observer was deceased as well. Both likely died in the original crash and explosions that followed, likely due to munitions on board. Crash site photos seen later, taken by the base photolab, showed the plane to be utterly destroyed and scattered over a wide area by the crash and explosions that followed. The pilot alert trailers were adjacent to our firehouse and a number of pilots quartered there were extremely remorseful following the death of Capt. Goss. I never knew him personally but saw a picture of him taken at an earlier date showing a handsome young man with a mustache. I later found out he was from Los Angeles. That was my first experience with a serious crash resulting in death of those aboard and I will forever remember that night. Peace be upon you Capt. Goss and may your soul rest in peace. Our country is forever indebted to you for your sacrifice. Some years ago I did get the priviledge of looking for and finding his name on the first panel of the Vietnam Wall. BobGV (View posts)


Press photo from 1964 featuring From Left Carol Goss, Holding Richard, 
2nd: Gregory, and Laura Goss Children looked at photographs of their father 
(Capt. Richard Goss) USAF

Karen Goss McGough looks at photographs of her first husband, Capt.Richard Goss, who died in Vietnam in 1964.  Due to an error, Richard's name was left off of the Vietnam Memorial. dated June 19 1987


USAF fixed-wing


Downed USAF Douglas A-1E, pilot was later awarded theMedal of HonorA-1 Skyraider-- --191 total, 150 in combat
–First loss A-1E 52-132465 (1st Air Commando Squadron, 34th TG) shot down during the night of 28–29 August 1964 near Bien Hoa, SVN. 
press photo from 1964 featuring Capt. Richard D. Goss Rites To Be Friday Funeral services for Air Force Capt. Richard D. Goss, 31, will be at 2 o'clock Friday in the Johnson & Hamilton chapel. Military graveside services will follow at Evergreen. 

Press photo from 1954 featuring Off Duty: Pvt. Karen A Balster, 12036 25th Av. N. E., a member of Seattle's Women Marine Classification Platoon, tried surf fishing while on two weeks' summer training at an Diego. Women in the reserve unit have time for fun and relaxation despite a strenuous training program.


press photo from 1954 featuring Richard D. Goss Aviation Cadet Richard D. Goss, formerly of Seattle, has arrived at Reese Air Force Base, Tex., to learn basic flying training. He recently completed primary training at Hondo, Tex.

Add caption


a 357 Colt Python that he’d been wearing when his plane was shot down and was supposedly lost, turned
 up on guntrader.com.  Long story short, the veteran who had brought it back from Vietnam to restore 
(heavily damaged) and return to the family – he couldn’t locate us because my his hometown was
listed as Los Angeles – his family has always lived in Seattle (They ried to change years ago but
Department of Defense wouldn’t budge.) In any event, the gun is safely back. They were able 
to track down the veteran who tried to return it to the family so many years ago, and he was so grief 
stricken to hear a friend he’d just given it to a few years before (he didn’t want his estate to dispose of it 
so he thought he was controlling its disposition by giving to another veteran with a son in the Army, who 
sold it to a pawn broker) – he bought it for $2,400 and got it back to the family. 



WHITEMAN AIR FORCE BASE
One of the major events affecting the base began in 1954 when the Air Force initiated a program renaming bases to recognize airmen who had performed in an exceptional manner. Nominations were accepted from the surrounding communities to give the air base a new name.  A board of officers was appointed to select three choices from a listing of six de­ceased Air Force heroes. The list included: General Hoyt S. Vandenberg, Lt. Charles A. Petty (Warrensburg), Lt. Eugene T. Tipton (War­rensburg), L­t. George A. Whiteman (Sedalia), Lt. Horace G. Roop and Lt. James D. Spore (Clinton).

On August 24, 1955 the US Air Force informed Mrs. Earlie Whiteman of Sedalia that the recently reopened Sedalia Air Force Base would be renamed Whiteman Air Force Base in tribute to her son, 2nd Lt. George A. Whiteman. The dedication and renaming ceremony took place on December 3, 1955.

As the base continued to mature in 1956, more buildings appeared on the skyline. With an increase in married personnel being assigned, housing became more critical. As a result, 400 housing units were requested. Bids were opened on and a $6.6 million contract for on-base housing construc­tion was awarded. Whiteman had within its five short years become a showplace as many federal and foreign govern­ment leaders con­tinually visited the base for a look at a typical SAC flying unit.

It was during this period that two Air Force legends crossed paths for the first time. In July 1958, the 509th Bombardment Wing was moving its aircraft from Walker AFB, New Mexico, to Pease AFB, New Hampshire, when bad weather forced the 509th’s airborne aircraft to Whiteman. The 509th’s B-47s remained for the night before proceeding to Pease. As a result of this chance meeting, the first recorded contact between the 509th and Whiteman had been made.
B-47
Despite the amount of work done on Whiteman to improve life in general, more changes were at hand. The reli­able B-47 air­craft was being phased out of the Air Force's inventory for the newer and more advanced B-52 Stratofortress. Even though Whiteman had served well as a B-47 base, there were no plans to continue the tradition with B-52s. SAC had other plans for White­man.

351 STRATEGIC MISSILE WING
The story of the 351 Strategic Missile Wing (SMW) at Whiteman began in April 1961 when test borings made in the area around the base determined the geological make-up would support a land-based ICBM system. Three months later the DOD announced plans to base the Minuteman I ICMB system at Whiteman. Groundbreaking ceremonies with a host of dignitaries in attendance were held in April 1962 at the site now called Oscar-01.
The project called for the excavation of 867,000 cubic yards of earth and rock. Contractors used 168,000 yards of concrete, 25,355 tons of reinforcing steel and 15,120 tons of structural steel, and the installation of a vast underground intersite network with enough cable to run from Whiteman AFB to 100 miles beyond Los Angeles. Amazingly, the construction and equipping of the 150 missile sites and 15 launch control centers took only two years, two months, and two weeks to complete. On June 29, 1964, the 351st went on full operational alert.
During the period May 1965 to October 1967 the Minuteman I was upgraded to the Minuteman II. Other modernization programs in the following decades improved the system and increased the survivability of the missile. In the mid-1980s the Minuteman Integrated Life Extension (Rivet MILE) program improved the safety, maintainability, and reliability of the missile facilities.

On 26 June 1976, wing personnel banded together to dedicate the Bi­centennial Peace Park.  The new park contained a Minuteman I missile, a B-47 bomber, and a UH-1H helicopter. Placed inside the missile and the bomber were time capsules containing artifacts from 1976. The boxes are to be opened when Whiteman is placed on inac­tive status or the year 2076, whichever oc­curs first.

On 11 June 1982, the base experienced a tragedy when a helicopter be­longing to Whiteman's Detachment 9, 37th Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Squadron, went down. The accident took the lives of the two pilots and four security policemen on board.
On July 31, 1991, President George H.W. Bush and Premier Mikhail Gorbachev signed the historic Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START) which called for dismantling and destruction of the Minuteman II ICBMs. President Bush ordered a stand-down of all Minuteman II missiles from alert well before the requirements of START called for such action. Less than 24 hours later, the 351st reported to SAC that its missile were off alert.
Two years later the wing’s first launch control center, India-01, shut down operations. On May 7, 1993, the last reentry vehicle was removed from Golf-02, and on December 8, 1993 the wing imploded its first silo, India-02. On May 18, 1995, the last Minuteman II missile, located at Juliet-03, was removed from its site. The 351st SMW was officially inactivated on July 31, 1995.



509 BOMB WING 

In 1988, as part of a rapid evolution which pushed technology to its limits, Congressman Ike Skelton announced the B-2 Advanced Technology Bomber would be based at Whiteman. The 509 Bomb Wing traces its histori­cal roots to its World War II ancestor, the 509 Composite Group, which was formed with one mission in mind: to drop the atomic bomb. The Group made history on August 6, 1945, when the B-29 "Enola Gay," piloted by Colonel Paul W. Tibbets, Jr., dropped the first atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan. On August 9, 1945, the “Bockscar,” piloted by Major Charles Sweeney visited the Japanese mainland and unleashed the atomic inferno upon Nagasaki.

On September 30, 1990, the 509th Bomb Wing was transferred to Whiteman AFB and in July 1993, accepted host responsibilities for the base. On 20 July 1993, Whiteman received its first perma­nently assigned aircraft in almost 30 years. Piloted by General Ronald A. Marcotte, T-38 #62-609, complete with a B-2-like paint scheme, touched down on the White­man runway at approximately 1000 hours.

On December 17, 1993, the ninetieth anniversary of Orville Wright’s historic first successful, controlled, heavier than air powered flight at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, the world’s most sophisticated and advanced aircraft, the B-2 Advanced Technology Bomber arrived at Whiteman Air Force Base. At approximately 1400 hours local, a low whine was heard and the gath­ered throng looked skyward to see a dark bat-shaped aircraft fly over. The Spirit of Missouri circled the field once and then landed. After taxing to the appointed spot, the engines stopped, the crew hatch opened and General John Michael Loh, ACC Commander, stepped off the plane, and into Air Force history.

Operation ALLIED FORCE
The B-2 first saw combat on March 23, 1999, during NATO operations in Serbia and Kosovo, the first sustained offensive combat air offensive conducted solely from US soil. Over a period of two months, the 509 generated 49 B-2 sorties flown directly from Missouri to Europe and return. Although the B-2s accounted for only 1 percent of all NATO sorties, the aircraft’s all-weather, precision capability allowed it to deliver 11 percent of the munitions used in the air campaign. The missions lasted an average of 29 hours, demonstrating the global reach of the B-2.
Operation ENDURING FREEDOM
Following the terrorist attacks on New York City and Washington, D.C. on September 11, 2001, the 509 quickly transitioned to a wartime mode by joining forces with the 314th Airlift Wing, Little Rock, AR, and the Missouri Air National Guard’s 139th Airlift Wing, St. Joseph, MO, to send Missouri Task Force-1 to assist rescue efforts at the World Trade Center.
In October 2001 the B-2 bombers led America’s strike force in Afghanistan, hitting the first targets in the country to “kick down the door” for the air campaign which followed. The bombers again flew from Missouri to their targets before landing at a forward location in the Indian Ocean to exchange crews which the engines continued to run. The combat missions lasted more than 40 hours, with the aircraft operating continuously for more than 70 hours without incident before returning to Whiteman.
After twice proving its ability to fly combat missions from Missouri, the wing stepped up efforts to deploy the B-2 from forward locations. By late 2002, the AF had completed special shelters for the aircraft at an overseas operating location. The shelters provided a controlled climate similar to the facilities at Whiteman for specialized work on the aircraft skin in order to maintain its stealth characteristics. This ability to sustain operations from a forward location added a new dimension of flexibility to potential air campaigns.
Operation IRAQI FREEDOM
The new shelters were put to use when the B-2 bombers again led a coalition air strike against the regime of Saddam Hussein, beginning on March 21, 2003. The famous “shock and awe” campaign saw unprecedented use of precision-guided munitions by the B-2 in an effort to minimize collateral damage and destroy key targets. The campaign also marked another milestone for the 509 BW, as B-2s flew combat missions from both Whiteman AFB and a forward deployed location simultaneously.
On December 17, 2003, the world celebrated the centennial of the first powered flight by the Wright Brothers. At the same time, the 509 Bomb Wing celebrated the 10-year anniversary of the Spirit of Missouri’s arrival at Whiteman. Only a decade after delivery, the B-2 was now a proven weapon system, a veteran of three campaigns and first-ever forward deployment. In recognition of the maturity of the system and the unit, the Air Force declared the B-2 Fully Operational Capable.

Since that day in 2003, the B-2’s forward presence has become a reality and proved that it can deliver combat airpower, any time and any place. The deployment to Guam, which began in February 2005, provided a continuous bomber presence in the Asia Pacific region and augmented Pacific Command’s establishment of a deterrent force. The 80-day tour, the longest in the bomber’s 13-year history, also marked the first B-2 deployment since the aircraft was declared fully operational.

THE FUTURE AND WHITEMAN AIR FORCE BASE

Whiteman Air Force Base is also home of the Air Force Reserve's 442nd Fighter Wing, flying A-10 Thunderbolt IIs; the Army National Guard's 1-135th Attack Battalion, flying the AH-64 Apache; and the Navy Reserve's Maritime Expeditionary Security Division 13, which provides light, mobile, short-duration, point defense Anti-Terrorism Force Protection forces for USN ships and aircraft and other high value assets in locations where U.S. or host-nation security infrastructure is either inadequate or non-existent.
In October 2008, the 131st Bomb Wing was activated at Whiteman AFB. As an Air National Guard “Classic Associate Unit” of the 509 Bomb Wing, the 131st BW retains a separate organizational structure and chain of command while its personnel are functionally integrated within the 509 BW, which maintains principal responsibility for the aircraft. This association enables both units to train and deploy personnel in support of the USAF B-2 mission.
The most powerful weapon at Whiteman is the Airmen. Airmen from all units have recently deployed in support of global combat operations. These warriors were also on the front lines of disaster bringing relief to the Gulf Coast after Hurricane Katrina devastated the region in September 2005. Whether serving at home or in forward locations, Whiteman Airmen exemplify the phrase, “Service before Self.”

Brett, Chen, Leonard visit Whiteman Air Force Base

jan 13, 2012
Hall of Famer George Brett, pitcher Bruce Chen and Royals Hall of Fame pitcher Dennis Leonard made two Caravan appearances today.  First, the group visited patients at the Kansas City VA Medical Center.  They then traveled east to Whiteman Air Force Base near Knob Noster, Mo.  Our group signed autographs for the airmen and their families.  They also took a close up look at the B-2…very cool!



This series of reports investigates charges of frequent mishandling of nuclear weapons at Whiteman Air Force Base. It is based on interviews conducted by The Daily Star-Journal during the past three months in collaboration with WDAF-TV, Channel 4, in Kansas City. The television station's series, "Failsafe," is being broadcast this week during its 10 p.m. newscast.

By Kenneth Amos
Star-Journal News Editor(Second of a serles)

Name: Essex, Eugene R.
Rank: Captain
Serial Number: 554-52-XXXX
Assignment: 351st Missile Security Squadron (SAC)
Base: Whiteman Air Force Base, Missouri
Age: 40 years old
Past duties: Vietnam veteran, career intelligence officer, missile-launch officer, and executive-support officer.
Present: Working for the deputy commander of the WAFB Combat Support Group.
Future: ??????????

The past two years have been "a living hell" for Capt. Essex and his family: albeit a self-made hell.
The 16-year veteran of the United States Air Force contends he has experienced a number of violations "of A-l sorts since I was 17 years old and came on active duty." Capt. Essex, who spent three years early in his career at Strategic Air Command headquarters in Omaha, Neb. as an intelligence officer specializing in Soviet electronic warfare and Soviet radar, has been stationed at Whiteman Air Force Base for the past four years. He and his wife, Laurel, and four children live at 314 Grover St.
The captain claims the violations he has witnessed range from persons simply ripping off a pen that belongs to the government, to stealing "tens of thousands of dollars of material airplanes, or whatever."
Although the latter contention seems far from trivial, there are problems much more serious in nature which, he maintains, occur with regularity at WAFB. This has prompted Capt. Essex to speak out. Those problems deal with nuclear safety and the possible compromise of national security. His allegations, brought to light in re cent months, triggered an investigation by Missouri Fourth District Congressman Ike Skelton, who yesterday received a report from the Air Force Inspector General Howard Leaf acknowledging problems related to weapons handling exist at WAFB.

Violations Reported
Adhering to Air Force regulations, Capt. Essex reported what he believed to be serious nuclear-safety violations to his commanding officers. Instead of receiving a commendation, or even something as simple as a pat on the back, Capt. Essex contends he was locked up in a "hard-core" mental institution threatened with injections of drugs, and has been the subject of continual harassment at the hands of his superiors at Whiteman.
The Air Force was asked for its response as to whether or not Capt. Essex is or has been a trusted officer, and to assess his character and career. The response it gave was a general description of duties and positions he has held throughout his career. Going by the book has changed the course of the unassuming life Capt. Essex once led. Instead of looking forward to retirement in a little more than three years, possibly as a major, and then working as the civilian counterpart of an intelligence officer thereafter, Essex now faces the unknown.
By his quest for the truth, he candidly admits his career has been jeopardized and he has been left to wonder about his future every day. "They've essentially ruined me as a professional in anything."
He contends the Air Force is now trying to force him out the door, and estimates it has cost them more than $100,000 to perpetrate a coverup regarding the seriousness of his charges.
His plight began approximately two years ago as a member of a two-man team that goes underground into a missile-launch facility. In the facility are the controls responsible for launching nuclear weapons.
Each of five capsules in a strategic missile squadron is in charge of 10 missiles that are connected with 40 others, for a total of 50 missiles. The five capsules are "tied together" to control the 50 missiles. There are three strategic missile squadrons — the 508th, 509th and 510th—controlling a total of 150 missiles.
In this complex network, two officers are "in the hole" at all times, for a total of 30 officers online.

Problems Begin
On occasion, Capt. Essex, the commander, was crewed with a then-27-year-old lieutenant—who he claims was a self admitted heavy drinker and drug user with a history of passing out while on duty.
Capt. Essex said the lieutenant, to him, admitted hallucinating, seeing such things as a woman who appears up out of a bush, and being worried about hearing voices. Capt. Essex dutifully reported to his super visor the lieutenant was "incompetent and unable to do his job." His reports contained allegations that while crewed together underground the lieutenant went berserk, not once, but several times.
One winter day Capt. Essex and the lieutenant were snowed in "November capsule," located approximately 45 minutes from WAFB, beyond regular-duty hours. They faced the possibility of being underground for two days instead of the normal 24 hours. Capt. Essex said he observed the lieutenant in an agitated state, worsening with each passing hour beyond the normal changeover time. At the 30-hour mark a ringing telephone, according to Capt. Essex, set the lieutenant off.
"I answered the phone. This individual ... screamed, yelled an obscenity and leaped toward me with the phone in his hand," so as to do bodily harm.
When the incident was reported, Capt. Essex said his supervisor said, "Yeah, Gene, we know this guy. We know he gets upset. We know he gets a little bit crazy. But all you have to do is tell him to shut up and sit down and you can control him."
According to Air Force regulations, if a person demonstrates emotional in stability (about anything from marriage problems to financial troubles) ... he must be removed from control of nuclear weapons until the particular problem is resolved.
Removal from duty is done in accordance with the Personnel Reliability Program (PRP). The program establishes the requirements and responsibilities for screening, selecting and continuously evaluating all personnel who control, handle, have access to, control the launch of, or control entry to Minuteman weapons on weapons systems. It also provides for the selection and retention of personnel who are emotionally stable and have demonstrated good judgement and pro fessional competence. It provides guidance for the removal of all individuals of questionable reliability.
The process of removing persons from this type of duty is known as "pulling their PRP." Assignment of a person to and removal from a personnel reliability position, according to the Air Force, is purely an administrative action and not a form of reward or punishment. Removal of a person from such a position requires reassignment to other duties, either temporarily or permanently.
Capt. Essex requested to never again be crewed with the individual and said he was told he would not be.
What happened?
A few months later "they crewed me with him permanently," Capt. Essex said laughing in disbelief.
But it was not a laughing matter to Capt. Essex at the time, as he again asked his immediate supervisor and his commander not to be crewed with the lieutenant. He said, "If you think he's competent, then I'm telling you that together as a crew we're not competent. And you're putting two people down there in the hole, an incompetent crew controlling nuclear weapons." The captain was told if he could not control the individual, he was not a fit commander.
"I couldn't believe it." Capt. Essex said. The veteran officer pondered the situation and concluded he may have possibly been wrong about the lieutenant. The two-man team had eight more alerts together, each further confirming Capt. Essex's earlier evaluation of the man. "What I felt was that the person needed professional counseling, which I couldn't give him."

It Happened Again The next major incident involving the pair occurred during Global Shield exercises in 1979.
Global Shield is an annual large-scale, no-notice, 20-day training exercise designed to test the command's capability to carry out Emergency War Orders which support the U.S. policy if deterrence fails, and to realistically measure SAC's response to a set of pre-planned events leading up to a simulated attack on the U.S.
Again, the lieutenant exhibited behavior considered by his commander undesirable for a missile-launch officer.
According to Capt. Essex, the crew's operations officer threatened them with a bad rating for changing over (turning control of the missile-launch facility over to another crew) too early during a learning exercise, even though records indicate they were not instructed when to do so.
At this indictment, the lieutenant "became very agitated" and argued with the major about the point for about one-half hour on the telephone, according to Capt. Essex, during a self explanatory sequence known as "communications minimize." The captain claims for the next 12 hours the lieutenant was walking around, "smashing his fists together. He was angry. He would leap up and start cussing." The crew that eventually succeeded Capt. Essex and the lieutenant later testified he was still in this state "when we were changed over."
"This is especially unacceptable because we were controlilng live Minutemen weapons," Capt. Essex said.
Once again, the captain reported the unusual behavior to his major, who proceeded, in front of a witness to threaten Capt. Essex with the establishment of an Unfavorable Information File (UIF), which according to Capt. Essex means death to the career of that officer.
The rub, Capt. Essex said, was that the man he had been reporting turned out to be the son of a retired colonel, who was the friend of a general, who just happened to be the commander of the he Strategic Air Command. The Air Force, however, maintains Capt. Essex's charges of influence are unfounded. Its response indicated that no time had there been any outside influence on anyone in the wing to affect the outcome of (the) investigation into Capt. Essex's allegations.

Investigation Takes Place Capt. Essex said a "token" investigation labeled him as being the problem, marking the beginning of his miseries.
At this juncture, Capt. Essex began contacting congressmen and attempted to secure information regarding the investigation through the Freedom of Information Act. He had not been allowed to know the findings of the investigation, but when he pieced most of it together he said he was shocked to find the results.
"They made accusations. They said I was incompetent when records that were available proved that I was not in competent."
He referred to an independent psychiatric examination con ducted by an Army flight surgeon and reservist in Kansas City.
"Senior officers, I can name at least four, lied in the investigation," Capt. Essex said pointedly.
As a result, Capt. Essex was removed from his duties, lost his security clearance, and was assigned to the Security Police Group. He also claimed his records have been falsified.
"Anybody who can read or write English, or can understand English, can read one statement by a colonel and read another statement where he denies what he said." From there, "I was locked up. I was put in the mental institute for 21 days. I was placed under house arrest illegally and escorted off base illegally. I've had two efficiency reports written on me which are just totally wrong ... provably so."
The mental hospital, located at Wilford-Hall Medical Center at Lackland Air Force Base, Tex., was the captain's next step into a seemingly unending nightmare.







Whiteman H19B used to Shuttle Parts and Personnel Between Minuteman Missile Pads








Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO












29. Launch Control Center, view looking in, alert crew mannequin at end of Launch Control Center. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO




















Minuteman Missile Silo  Whiteman Air Force Base
  • Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on images made by the U.S. Government; images copied from other sources may be restricted.(http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/res/114_habs.html)
  • Call Number: HAER MO-87
  • Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print
  • Notes:
    • Significance: During the Cold War years, the Nation's nuclear arsenal included 1,000 Minuteman missiles. The Oscar-01 Missile Alert Facility (MAF) at Whiteman Air Force Base (AFB) was an integral part of that system. Oscar-01 was in the 510th Strategic Missile Squadron (SMS) of the 351st Strategic Missile Wing (SMW), which encompassed 150 Minuteman missile silos. Oscar-01 was the only MAF in the Nation that was built within the confines of an air force base; other MAFs were constructed in rural areas surrounding bases. Oscar-01 was also the first MAF to schedule all-female, mixed-gender, and all-Black crews. In addition, Oscar-01, which was the designated Squadron Command Post (SCP) for the 510th Strategic Missile Squadron, is significant for its association with the Emergency Rocket Communications System (ERCS). As part of ERCS, ten Minuteman missiles of the 510th SMS carried Ultra-High Frequency (UHF) transmitters in their nose cones, in lieu of warheads. In the event of war, the President of the United States would direct missile combat crews to record emergency action messages on the ERCS system. 
      • Once launched, the missiles' ERCS messages would then be transmitted, over and over again, to SAC forces worldwide.
      • Survey number: HAER MO-87
      • Building/structure dates: 1946 Initial Construction
    • Place:
    • Latitude/Longitude: 38.76667, -93.55833
    • Collections:
    • Part of: Historic American Engineering Record (Library of Congress
Robert John Morris, Jr
Captain
716TH BOMB SQDN, 307TH STRAT WING, SAC
United States Air Force
St Charles, Missouri
July 24, 1945 to December 26, 1972
ROBERT J MORRIS Jr is on the Wall at Panel W1, Line 105
See the full profile or name rubbing for Robert Morris
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phambase.gif
Robert J Morris
usafseal.gif sac.gif 307stratwg.gif

Attached are four photos to post on The Virtual Wall:
- - K. Haberstroh, 02-26-2013
Captain Robert John Morris, Jr. wedding photograph from August 5, 1967
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Captain Morris with wife Nancy, daughter Cary and son Robert.
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From dedication of a B-52 Bomber at Whiteman AF Base July 24, 2009. Captain Robert John Morris, Jr. was the only pilot killed in action from Missouri. A B-52 static display was dedicated to Captain Morris and the crew of Ebony-02 who flew during Operation Linebacker II during the Vietnam War. See full news article and slide show of dedication ceremonies on the Whiteman Air Force Baseweb site.
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Dedication Plaque at Whiteman Air Force Base, Sedalia, Missouri
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Captain Robert John Morris, Jr. article from the Sedalia Democrat Newspaper for the July 24, 2009 B-52 dedication of the Ebony-02 at Whiteman AF Base, Sedalia, Missouri.
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Frustrated by problems in negotiating a peace settlement, and pressured by a Congress and public wanting an immediate end to American involvement in Vietnam, President Nixon ordered the most concentrated air offensive of the war - known as Linebacker II - in December 1972.

The bombings were not conducted without exceedingly high loss of aircraft and personnel. During the month of December 1972, 62 crewmembers of B52 aircraft were shot down and captured or went missing. Of these 62, 33 men were released in 1973. The others remained missing at the end of the war. Over half of these had survived to eject safely.

One B52D aircraft flown by Captain Robert J. Morris, Jr. was shot down near Hanoi on December 26, 1972. The crew onboard included Captain Michael H. LaBeau; Captain Nutter J. Wimbrow III; First Lieutenant Robert M. Hudson; First Lieutenant Duane P. Vavroch; and Sergeant James R. Cook. The pilot gave the bail-out order and the crew of the aircraft parachuted to safety.

LaBeau, Vavroch, Hudson and Cook were captured by the North Vietnamese almost immediately. Cook had been badly injured. These four spent the next six weeks as "guests" in the Hanoi prison system. Ultimately, they were released in Operation Homecoming on February 12, 1973.

At the time of the incident, General Robert T. Herres, (then Colonel), was the flying unit commander of the 449th Bomb Wing out of Kincheloe AFB, stationed in the Upper Peninsula, Michigan, when he learned that one of his crews, E-21, had been shot down. The North Vietnamese had shot 68 surface-to-air missiles (SAM) that night, resulting in two downed B-52s. Surprisingly, there were not more losses considering there were 120 bombers and 113 support aircraft in a very small piece of the sky that night. Immediately after finding out about the incident, Colonel Herres and his wife Shirley went to visit each of the crewmember's spouses and shared information and prayers with them.

For almost 5 years, the families of Captains Morris and Wimbrow awaited news of the fate of their loved one. Hanoi denied any knowledge of the pilot or his crew member until, in late September 1977, the Vietnamese "discovered" the remains of Morris and Wimbrow and returned them to U.S. control. Disturbing testimony was given to Congress in 1980 that the Vietnamese held the remains of Americans to return at politically advantageous times. Perhaps this was the case for Morris and Wimbrow.
Captain Robert John Morris, Jr. was buried in Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery in St. Louis Missouri. In addition, he has an "In Memory of" marker in the memorial section of Arlington National Cemetery in Washington, D.C.
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Contact Us© Copyright 1997-2013 www.VirtualWall.org, Ltd ®(TM)Last update 09/12/2013

Date:11-JUN-1976
Time:
Type:Silhouette image of generic HAR model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Hawker Siddeley EAV-8A Harrier
Owner/operator:8a Escuadrilla, Spanish Navy
Registration:VA.1-1/008-2
C/n / msn:712185/99
Fatalities:Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 1
Other fatalities:0
Airplane damage:Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Location:Whiteman AFB, Missouri -    United States of America
Phase:Take off
Nature:Military
Departure airport:Whiteman AFB, Missouri (SZL/KSZL)
Destination airport:
Narrative:
Crashed at Whiteman AFB, Missouri, USA at approx 38°43′49″N, 093°32′53″W. 

Pilot was part of the first group of Harrier pilots who, following their US Navy course were passed into the hands of McDonnell Douglas for conversion training.

Pilot Lt. Trujillo, 8a Escuadrilla, ejected safely following loss of control during take-off



U S AIR FORCE
A-10 THUNDERBOLT (WARTHOG)

Two A-10 Thunderbolt IIs from the 442nd Fighter Wing, fly formation off the wing of a KC-135 Stratotanker during the wing's Employer Appreciation Day, Nov. 3. Civilian employers of wing reservists were treated to a ride in two of the aerial tankers during the event. The 442nd FW is an Air Force Reserve unit at Whiteman AFB, Mo.

(U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Tom Talbert)

2009


Whiteman Air Force Base, Missouri  B-2's on the Tarmac


ll

Neil Heimsoth "The Fifteenth" Royal Oaks Golf Course-Whiteman AFB, Missouri

Whiteman Air Force Base 1954-64
Thanks Joe Tybor





























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